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Emma
     

Emma

2.5 6
by Jane Austen
 

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Esta novela cómica narra una deliciosa historia de confusiones amorosas y delicados sentimientos, donde la señorita Woodhouse, en su empeño por hacer de celestina y de procurar la felicidad amorosa de todas sus amigas, acaba descuidando su propio corazón. Escrita con un estilo esteticista de minucioso detalle y cierto tono intimista, Jane Austen retrata

Overview

Esta novela cómica narra una deliciosa historia de confusiones amorosas y delicados sentimientos, donde la señorita Woodhouse, en su empeño por hacer de celestina y de procurar la felicidad amorosa de todas sus amigas, acaba descuidando su propio corazón. Escrita con un estilo esteticista de minucioso detalle y cierto tono intimista, Jane Austen retrata magistralmente la vida social de la época, con sus costumbres y rígida moral.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Jane Austen deserves, and here gets, the reward of other people's skillful work on her little bit of ivory, two inches wide.... The Cambridge Edition justifies its claim to the 'the first ever scholarly edition of the works of Jane Austen', and is a fine tribute to her for the twenty-first century."
-Jane Austen Society Newsletter

"scrupulous text and copious annotations"
JASNA News

VOYA - Donna L. Phillips
For those who missed not only Austen's book but also the 1996 film and the 2010 PBS Masterpiece Classic, Emma is the story of a young woman who believes she is a consummate matchmaker, following one success for which she questionably claims full responsibility. She quickly finds a fresh focus for her matchmaking genius when she is introduced to Harriet Smith, a young woman of pleasing demeanor and fresh looks but unknown parentage. Despite this absence of pedigree, Emma is convinced that Miss Smith deserves a genteel mate. When a young farmer proposes to Harriet, Emma urges her to demur, then attempts with disastrous results to match her to three socially suitable gentlemen. Nearly too late, Emma realizes that the last of these, Mr. Knightley, is the man she really prefers for herself. Emma is one of nine classical romances reprised by HarperTeen. As other reviewers have noticed, each has a flowery red-and-white-on-black cover reminiscent of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series. All but the ablest readers among Stephenie Meyer's fans will find Austen's seventeenth-century syntax a daunting read, with little resemblance to Meyer beyond its cover. Those who love Jane Austen, however, will appreciate any ploy that brings back a beloved and wonderfully insightful writer. Extras appended to Austen's original text include "10 Things You Didn't Know about Jane Austen" and a quiz, "Have you found your match? See if Emma would approve your choice!" These are not 5Q but will appeal to some teens. Reviewer: Donna L. Phillips
Children's Literature - Paula McMillen
Emma Woodhouse is not, at first, an easy character to like. She meddles in people's lives—especially their love lives—often with painful results. As the younger daughter of a landed family, she sits at the top of the village foodchain; for in Regency-era England social class controls everything. Emma is both victim and perpetuator of the system. When she begins to mentor a young woman in the village, she initially convinces Harriet that marrying a well-to-do farmer is "beneath" her. Emma's older sister, living in London and married to John Knightley, is effectively out of the picture and Emma is solely responsible for companionship and care of her hypochondriacal father. John Knightley's brother still runs the family estate nearby and has been a stalwart friend of the Woodhouse family for years. The local Mr. Knightley (George, as we learn late in the book), has taken a long-time interest in curbing some of Emma's less desirable interferences and snobbish behavior. After a fair amount of convoluted plotting and interpersonal drama, Emma acknowledges the folly of her ways and realizes that Mr. George Knightley is the person she truly loves. Emma, and Austen's work in general, have been valued for providing satirical insights on the social class structure of the time. This edition of Austen's classic is supplemented with minimal information about the author, "10 Things You Didn't Know About Jane Austen," and a "quiz" that allows you to rate your boyfriend. Although ostensibly designed to engage teen readers, these add-ons will not facilitate traversing a lengthy tome written in the language of the time which presents some challenges (e.g., "stoppt" for stopped, or "is not it") as well as some smiles (e.g., referring to inappropriate young men as coxcombs or puppies). The availability of relatively recent movie versions of Austen's works may entice some female readers to persist, however. Reviewer: Paula McMillen, Ph.D.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788466312073
Publisher:
Santillana USA Publishing Company
Publication date:
03/15/2011
Edition description:
Spanish-language Edition
Pages:
620
Product dimensions:
4.90(w) x 7.30(h) x 1.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

Volume One

Chapter One

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.

She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father; and had, in consequence of her sister's marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period. Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.

Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse's family, less as a governess than a friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.

The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.

Sorrow came—a gentlesorrow—but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness.—Miss Taylor married. It was Miss Taylor's loss which first brought grief. It was on the wedding-day of this beloved friend that Emma first sat in mournful thought of any continuance. The wedding over, and the bride-people gone, her father and herself were left to dine together, with no prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what she had lost.

The event had every promise of happiness for her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her. The want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of every day. She recalled her past kindness—the kindness, the affection of sixteen years—how she had taught and how she had played with her from five years old—how she had devoted all her powers to attach and amuse her in health—and how nursed her through the various illnesses of childhood. A large debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect unreserve which had soon followed Isabella's marriage, on their being left to each other, was yet a dearer, tenderer recollection. She had been a friend and companion such as few possessed: intelligent, well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of the family, interested in all its concerns, and peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure, every scheme of hers—one to whom she could speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an affection for her as could never find fault.

How was she to bear the change?—It was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude. She dearly loved her father, but he was no companion for her. He could not meet her in conversation, rational or playful.

The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all hi's life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.

Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.

Highbury, the large and populous village, almost amounting to a town, to which Hartfield, in spite of its separate lawn, and shrubberies, and name, did really belong, afforded her no equals. The Woodhouses were first in consequence there. All looked up to them. She had many acquaintance in the place, for her father was universally civil, but not one among them who could be accepted in lieu of Miss Taylor for even half a day. It was a melancholy change; and Emma could not but sigh over it, and wish for impossible things, till her father awoke, and made it necessary to be cheerful. His spirits required support. He was a nervous man, easily depressed; fond of every body that he was used to, and hating to part with them; hating change of every kind. Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter's marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion. . .

What People are Saying About This

Harold. Bloom
"To me, as an American critic, Emma seems the most Englilsh of English novels....It is Austin's masterpiece, the largest triumph of her vigorous art."
From the Publisher
"No one creates silly English characters better than Austen, and Wanda McCaddon is up to the challenge." —-AudioFile

Meet the Author

A. Walton Litz is professor emeritus of English at Princeton University.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 16, 1775
Date of Death:
July 18, 1817
Place of Birth:
Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
Place of Death:
Winchester, Hampshire, England
Education:
Taught at home by her father

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Emma 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The translation to the Spanish language is bad.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has been transated into Spanish either by an electronic translator or by someone who doesn't know Spanish. It is absolutely impossible to read. I have gotten my money back
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I though it was going to be easier to read than the english version but what a surprise i got it is even harder because the translation is bad! It shouldnt be allowed to sell it this way, it is a waste of money and fraud! Dont buy it! Better the english version that cost 2 dollars less!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excelente version digital. Me encanto este libro.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I started to read Emma, I found it really boring because I had no idea what it was about. So I rented the movie and loved it. It's the Clueless of that time. I would recomend it to everyone