Emma (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) by Jane Austen, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Emma

Emma

4.2 450
by Jane Austen
     
 

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Esta novela cómica narra una deliciosa historia de confusiones amorosas y delicados sentimientos, donde la señorita Woodhouse, en su empeño por hacer de celestina y de procurar la felicidad amorosa de todas sus amigas, acaba descuidando su propio corazón. Escrita con un estilo esteticista de minucioso detalle y cierto tono intimista, Jane

Overview

Esta novela cómica narra una deliciosa historia de confusiones amorosas y delicados sentimientos, donde la señorita Woodhouse, en su empeño por hacer de celestina y de procurar la felicidad amorosa de todas sus amigas, acaba descuidando su propio corazón. Escrita con un estilo esteticista de minucioso detalle y cierto tono intimista, Jane Austen retrata magistralmente la vida social de la época, con sus costumbres y rígida moral.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"No one creates silly English characters better than Austen, and Wanda McCaddon is up to the challenge." —AudioFile
VOYA - Donna L. Phillips
For those who missed not only Austen's book but also the 1996 film and the 2010 PBS Masterpiece Classic, Emma is the story of a young woman who believes she is a consummate matchmaker, following one success for which she questionably claims full responsibility. She quickly finds a fresh focus for her matchmaking genius when she is introduced to Harriet Smith, a young woman of pleasing demeanor and fresh looks but unknown parentage. Despite this absence of pedigree, Emma is convinced that Miss Smith deserves a genteel mate. When a young farmer proposes to Harriet, Emma urges her to demur, then attempts with disastrous results to match her to three socially suitable gentlemen. Nearly too late, Emma realizes that the last of these, Mr. Knightley, is the man she really prefers for herself. Emma is one of nine classical romances reprised by HarperTeen. As other reviewers have noticed, each has a flowery red-and-white-on-black cover reminiscent of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series. All but the ablest readers among Stephenie Meyer's fans will find Austen's seventeenth-century syntax a daunting read, with little resemblance to Meyer beyond its cover. Those who love Jane Austen, however, will appreciate any ploy that brings back a beloved and wonderfully insightful writer. Extras appended to Austen's original text include "10 Things You Didn't Know about Jane Austen" and a quiz, "Have you found your match? See if Emma would approve your choice!" These are not 5Q but will appeal to some teens. Reviewer: Donna L. Phillips
Children's Literature - Paula McMillen
Emma Woodhouse is not, at first, an easy character to like. She meddles in people's lives—especially their love lives—often with painful results. As the younger daughter of a landed family, she sits at the top of the village foodchain; for in Regency-era England social class controls everything. Emma is both victim and perpetuator of the system. When she begins to mentor a young woman in the village, she initially convinces Harriet that marrying a well-to-do farmer is "beneath" her. Emma's older sister, living in London and married to John Knightley, is effectively out of the picture and Emma is solely responsible for companionship and care of her hypochondriacal father. John Knightley's brother still runs the family estate nearby and has been a stalwart friend of the Woodhouse family for years. The local Mr. Knightley (George, as we learn late in the book), has taken a long-time interest in curbing some of Emma's less desirable interferences and snobbish behavior. After a fair amount of convoluted plotting and interpersonal drama, Emma acknowledges the folly of her ways and realizes that Mr. George Knightley is the person she truly loves. Emma, and Austen's work in general, have been valued for providing satirical insights on the social class structure of the time. This edition of Austen's classic is supplemented with minimal information about the author, "10 Things You Didn't Know About Jane Austen," and a "quiz" that allows you to rate your boyfriend. Although ostensibly designed to engage teen readers, these add-ons will not facilitate traversing a lengthy tome written in the language of the time which presents some challenges (e.g., "stoppt" for stopped, or "is not it") as well as some smiles (e.g., referring to inappropriate young men as coxcombs or puppies). The availability of relatively recent movie versions of Austen's works may entice some female readers to persist, however. Reviewer: Paula McMillen, Ph.D.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781407090580
Publisher:
Random House Adult Trade Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/31/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
512
File size:
539 KB

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Emma

What People are saying about this

Harold. Bloom
"To me, as an American critic, Emma seems the most Englilsh of English novels....It is Austin's masterpiece, the largest triumph of her vigorous art."
From the Publisher
"No one creates silly English characters better than Austen, and Wanda McCaddon is up to the challenge." —-AudioFile

Meet the Author

A. Walton Litz is professor emeritus of English at Princeton University.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 16, 1775
Date of Death:
July 18, 1817
Place of Birth:
Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
Place of Death:
Winchester, Hampshire, England
Education:
Taught at home by her father

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Emma 4.2 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 450 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While I love Pride and Prejudice the best, Emma is definitely my second favorite of Ausent's works. I prefer the story of the former novel, but other than that I can say that I love, love, absolutely love Emma. As much as I adore Mr. Darcy (Along with every other female in the world) it must be confessed that I am madly in love with Mr. Knightly, and I read the entire book just for the scenes he is in. Although Pride and Prejudice can be called perfect, I find the Declaration-of-Love scene in Emma to be much more endearing and wonderful. I find that love of Pride and Prejudice generally has to be shared, since it is such a well known story, even to the most illiterate of people. As Emma is not as ubiquitously loved, I feel like the book has a more exclusive place in my heart, and that makes me love it all the more.
SillyWillyShakespeare More than 1 year ago
Emma is a hilarious novel which I thoroughly enjoyed. As I escaped into the twists and turns of the social circle in Emma's small town, I found myself laughing, crying, berating characters, and gushing about how much I loved this book. Emma's blindness to what is going on around her in the way of love endears her even more. Emma is beautiful, charming, and what every young lady in those days ought to be. She's a dutiful daughter, and usually very proper, though she has a love of matchmaking, something she really isn't very good at. She encounters very memorable characters and finds herself in the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jane Austen is one of the most talented novelists I know of. The first book I read by Austen is Pride and Prejudice, and when I had the opportunity to read another for pleasure as well as academics, I couldn’t pass it up. The novel, Emma, consists of advanced vocabulary and complex word phrasing, but with a dictionary by my side, nothing was in my way. Once I picked it up, it was hard to put it back down. In the novel Emma, Emma Woodhouse is the only lady in the house of many men. She therefore makes all the important decisions and has a degree of power and independence. Throughout the life of Emma, there are many situations in which any typical teenage girl can relate to. Emma doesn’t believe in finding her so called soul mate, so she meddles with others’ to help them find theirs. Regardless, she is admired and respected by all. One of the most powerful messages I acquired from this novel is learning that you cannot prevent the inevitable. Whatever road you are on is the one you are meant to take. To get to the man of her dreams, Mr. Knightley, it wasn't quite the simplest road ever. She goes through five weddings, a half-dozen major misunderstandings, and 400 pages pass before she learns of it, but Emma's ending is as happy and triumphant as the close of Pride and Prejudice. In the beginning of the book up until about the 250 page mark, the story is somewhat slow, but as Emma discovers that her love matchmaking isn’t quite working out for her, Mr. Knightley’s charm speeds up the book. Although the language is somewhat difficult to interpret, it's worth the read. The story is witty, charming and full of loveable characters. I guarantee that you will have the hardest time putting the book down. Although Emma is one of the longer books Jane Austen has written, it is inspirational in every way from beginning to end. It is a comedy of Emma as she learns to find her happily ever after. Emma is, without a doubt, one of the best books I have read in a very long time. I rarely ever have the time to pick up a well written book and read it from front to back, but I can honestly say that this book fulfilled that need; definitely a good book to pick up on a rainy weekend.
Zipperhips More than 1 year ago
I loved Emma. Then again, I also loved Clueless, and guess which one was easier to get through?
Vovo More than 1 year ago
Emma Woodhouse is a character who is wealthy, prejudiced, witty yet ignorant, innocent yet blameable, and altogether lovely. She is admired by her friends and held in doting compassion by all of her readers. When Emma seeks to aid her poor, orphaned friend Harriet Smith in finding a rich husband, she sets herself up for learning a few very difficult life lessons. She learns what it is to be humbled, to be wrong, to be accused, and, ultimately, to be forgiven. Jane Austen had a knack for writing good, clean romances with somewhat surprising endings. In Pride and Prejudice, there is an elopement. In Sense and Sensibility, there is a canceled engagement. In Emma, there is a secret engagement between two characters which is not revealed until the end. It is very common knowledge that Austen did not believe her readers would like her Emma. Despite what the authoress may have originally thought, Emma is still in print after two hundred years of being enjoyed by generation upon generation of readers. The story is beautiful, imaginative, and realistic- a story that people of every age can fully appreciate. Emma Woodhouse seems to be perfect. She is attractive, wealthy, and graceful. She visits the poor, attends church, and nourishes her friendships. But, like all mankind, she has little flaws hiding beneath her bonnet. She harbors a high opinion of herself and of her intellect. She feels that she is capable of speaking things into existence. She learns, as we all do, that her whims and fancies must be bridled. She learns that her opinions are not superior and that she does not possess power over love. I greatly enjoyed reading Emma. She was someone I could relate to, understand, laugh at, cry with, and applaud in the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is inscrutable.
Anonymous 20 hours ago
Flew in carrying desserts and drinks "lets have a party"
Anonymous 1 days ago
Walks in
Anonymous 2 days ago
She is a teen but now mom with color changing eyes.......she wears a hood most of the time
Anonymous 6 days ago
He sighed, resting in a tree.
Anonymous 10 days ago
I'll be yours.
Anonymous 10 days ago
ello....he says in a british accent
Anonymous 10 days ago
((Sorry guys, I'm not gonna be able to be in this rp anymore. It's just some real-world problems, bye ;~; I'll miss you guys... especially you, Rezon, you were the first person to talk to me here X3 bye...))
Anonymous 10 days ago
A nymph glides in. "Hello," she said. Her elvish features seemed to shift with different tree or leaf patterns.
Anonymous 10 days ago
I walk in, utterly confused. "Hello??" (Hello, Im new here. Call me Jessie if you're simply talking to me. Oh, and if I may ask, where are bios??)
Anonymous 11 days ago
Walks in.
Anonymous 11 days ago
Kenta)) A cute, nervous centaur girl trots in. Her long, blonde hair spills down her back and shoulders. Her horse ears flick at the top of her head. Her lower body is a chesnut brown stallion. She has a long, thick, tail, the color of the sky. Her dress has no straps, just reaches up to below her shoulders. It drapes over the lower half of her body, reaching halfway up the back, the fabric spilling over the front. On her hooves, hardly hanging on, are crushed, tiny slippers. They suggest a failled attempt to get shoes onto a centauress.
Anonymous 12 days ago
She wandered around, a small puff of air escaping her lips from her amazment at the woods' natural beauty.
Anonymous 12 days ago
*GASP!!!!!*
Anonymous 12 days ago
So what happened to the old woods?
Anonymous 4 months ago
What an excellent version of this classic tale of romance. The end always makes me do a little happy dance.
Anonymous 4 months ago
Anonymous 8 months ago
Hello. My name is Thunderbolt (but just call me Thunder) my fur is soft gray with black and white ticking. My eyes are electric blue and my fur is midlength. I am four, frightened and all alone in the world. I may sound pitiful but l highly reccomend not fighting me for your sake only! I know nothing about my past other than l was born a domestic cat and then thrown in a dumpster because l was the runt. Please title your reply as welcome Thunder or to Thunder. Purrs; Thunderbolt
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an easier Jane Austen book to read and I loved it.