Emma

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Overview

A lively young heiress takes up matchmaking, and her schemes result in comic confusion for a social-climbing parson, a chatterbox spinster, an enigmatic Romeo, and other inhabiatants of a 19th-century English village. Sparkling satire in one of Austen's finest novels

Sparkling comedy of provincial manners concerns a well-intentioned young heiress and her matchmaking schemes that result in comic confusion for the inhabitants of a 19th-century ...
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Emma

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Overview

A lively young heiress takes up matchmaking, and her schemes result in comic confusion for a social-climbing parson, a chatterbox spinster, an enigmatic Romeo, and other inhabiatants of a 19th-century English village. Sparkling satire in one of Austen's finest novels

Sparkling comedy of provincial manners concerns a well-intentioned young heiress and her matchmaking schemes that result in comic confusion for the inhabitants of a 19th-century English village. Droll characterizations of the well-intentioned heroine-one of Austen's immortal creations-and her hypochondriacal father-plus many other finely drawn personalities. This sparkling satire of provincial life is one of Jane Austen's finest novels.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"No one creates silly English characters better than Austen, and Wanda McCaddon is up to the challenge." —-AudioFile
Children's Literature - Paula McMillen
Emma Woodhouse is not, at first, an easy character to like. She meddles in people's lives—especially their love lives—often with painful results. As the younger daughter of a landed family, she sits at the top of the village foodchain; for in Regency-era England social class controls everything. Emma is both victim and perpetuator of the system. When she begins to mentor a young woman in the village, she initially convinces Harriet that marrying a well-to-do farmer is "beneath" her. Emma's older sister, living in London and married to John Knightley, is effectively out of the picture and Emma is solely responsible for companionship and care of her hypochondriacal father. John Knightley's brother still runs the family estate nearby and has been a stalwart friend of the Woodhouse family for years. The local Mr. Knightley (George, as we learn late in the book), has taken a long-time interest in curbing some of Emma's less desirable interferences and snobbish behavior. After a fair amount of convoluted plotting and interpersonal drama, Emma acknowledges the folly of her ways and realizes that Mr. George Knightley is the person she truly loves. Emma, and Austen's work in general, have been valued for providing satirical insights on the social class structure of the time. This edition of Austen's classic is supplemented with minimal information about the author, "10 Things You Didn't Know About Jane Austen," and a "quiz" that allows you to rate your boyfriend. Although ostensibly designed to engage teen readers, these add-ons will not facilitate traversing a lengthy tome written in the language of the time which presents some challenges (e.g., "stoppt" for stopped, or "is not it") as well as some smiles (e.g., referring to inappropriate young men as coxcombs or puppies). The availability of relatively recent movie versions of Austen's works may entice some female readers to persist, however. Reviewer: Paula McMillen, Ph.D.
VOYA - Donna L. Phillips
For those who missed not only Austen's book but also the 1996 film and the 2010 PBS Masterpiece Classic, Emma is the story of a young woman who believes she is a consummate matchmaker, following one success for which she questionably claims full responsibility. She quickly finds a fresh focus for her matchmaking genius when she is introduced to Harriet Smith, a young woman of pleasing demeanor and fresh looks but unknown parentage. Despite this absence of pedigree, Emma is convinced that Miss Smith deserves a genteel mate. When a young farmer proposes to Harriet, Emma urges her to demur, then attempts with disastrous results to match her to three socially suitable gentlemen. Nearly too late, Emma realizes that the last of these, Mr. Knightley, is the man she really prefers for herself. Emma is one of nine classical romances reprised by HarperTeen. As other reviewers have noticed, each has a flowery red-and-white-on-black cover reminiscent of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series. All but the ablest readers among Stephenie Meyer's fans will find Austen's seventeenth-century syntax a daunting read, with little resemblance to Meyer beyond its cover. Those who love Jane Austen, however, will appreciate any ploy that brings back a beloved and wonderfully insightful writer. Extras appended to Austen's original text include "10 Things You Didn't Know about Jane Austen" and a quiz, "Have you found your match? See if Emma would approve your choice!" These are not 5Q but will appeal to some teens. Reviewer: Donna L. Phillips
From Barnes & Noble
Charming, willful Emma Woodehouse amuses herself by planning other people's lives. When her interfering backfires, she learns a bitter lesson: well-intentioned busybodies are as resented as those motivated by ill will, and everyone should learn to respect the individuality of others.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783849552688
  • Publisher: TREDITION CLASSICS
  • Publication date: 8/13/2013
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.93 (d)

Meet the Author

JANE AUSTEN was born in 1775, the seventh of eight children. She enjoyed a happy and close-family life in Steventon, where her father was a rector. Her first novel, Sense and Sensibility, was published in 1811, followed by Pride and Prejudice in 1813. Emma was Jane's fourth novel, published in 1815. Jane died at the age of 41 in 1817 having completed six much-loved novels, as well as writing poems, short stories and three unfinished novels. All six published novels have been turned into a number of TV and big screen adaptations, a testament to her enduring popularity nearly 200 years after her death.

Biography

In 1801, George Austen retired from the clergy, and Jane, Cassandra, and their parents took up residence in Bath, a fashionable town Jane liked far less than her native village. Jane seems to have written little during this period. When Mr. Austen died in 1805, the three women, Mrs. Austen and her daughters, moved first to Southampton and then, partly subsidized by Jane's brothers, occupied a house in Chawton, a village not unlike Jane's first home. There she began to work on writing and pursued publishing once more, leading to the anonymous publication of Sense and Sensibility in 1811 and Pride and Prejudice in 1813, to modestly good reviews.

Known for her cheerful, modest, and witty character, Jane Austen had a busy family and social life, but as far as we know very little direct romantic experience. There were early flirtations, a quickly retracted agreement to marry the wealthy brother of a friend, and a rumored short-lived attachment -- while she was traveling -- that has not been verified. Her last years were quiet and devoted to family, friends, and writing her final novels. In 1817 she had to interrupt work on her last and unfinished novel, Sanditon, because she fell ill. She died on July 18, 1817, in Winchester, where she had been taken for medical treatment. After her death, her novels Northanger Abbey and Persuasion were published, together with a biographical notice, due to the efforts of her brother Henry. Austen is buried in Winchester Cathedral.

Author biography courtesy of Barnes & Noble Books.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      December 16, 1775
    2. Place of Birth:
      Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
    1. Date of Death:
      July 18, 1817
    2. Place of Death:
      Winchester, Hampshire, England
    1. Education:
      Taught at home by her father

Read an Excerpt

Emma


By Jane Austen

Vintage

Copyright © 2007 Jane Austen
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780307386847

Chapter One


EMMA WOODHOUSE, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.

She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father; and had, in consequence of her sister's marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period. Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection.

Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse's family, less as a governess than a friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.

The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself: these were thedisadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.

Sorrow came-a gentle sorrow-but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness. Miss Taylor married. It was Miss Taylor's loss which first brought grief. It was on the wedding day of this beloved friend that Emma first sat in mournful thought of any continuance. The wedding over, and the bride people gone, her father and herself were left to dine together, with no prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what she had lost.

The event had every promise of happiness for her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her. The want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of every day. She recalled her past kindness-the kindness, the affection of sixteen years-how she had taught and how she had played with her from five years old-how she had devoted all her powers to attach and amuse her in health-and how nursed her through the various illnesses of childhood. A large debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect unreserve which had soon followed Isabella's marriage, on their being left to each other, was yet a dearer, tenderer recollection. She had been a friend and companion such as few possessed; intelligent, well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of the family, interested in all its concerns, and peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure, every scheme of hers; one to whom she could speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an affection for her as could never find fault.

How was she to bear the change? It was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston, only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude. She dearly loved her father, but he was no companion for her. He could not meet her in conversation, rational or playful.

The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.

Her sister, though comparatively but little removed by matrimony, being settled in London, only sixteen miles off, was much beyond her daily reach; and many a long October and November evening must be struggled through at Hartfield, before Christmas brought the next visit from Isabella and her husband, and their little children, to fill the house, and give her pleasant society again.

Highbury, the large and populous village almost amounting to a town, to which Hartfield, in spite of its separate lawn, and shrubberies, and name, did really belong, afforded her no equals. The Woodhouses were first in consequence there. All looked up to them. She had many acquaintances in the place, for her father was universally civil, but not one among them who could be accepted in lieu of Miss Taylor for even half a day. It was a melancholy change; and Emma could not but sigh over it, and wish for impossible things, till her father awoke, and made it necessary to be cheerful. His spirits required support. He was a nervous man, easily depressed; fond of everybody that he was used to, and hating to part with them; hating change of every kind. Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter's marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion, though it had been entirely a match of affection, when he was now obliged to part with Miss Taylor too; and from his habits of gentle selfishness, and of being never able to suppose that other people could feel differently from himself, he was very much disposed to think Miss Taylor had done as sad a thing for herself as for them, and would have been a great deal happier if she had spent all the rest of her life at Hartfield. Emma smiled and chatted as cheerfully as she could, to keep him from such thoughts; but when tea came, it was impossible for him not to say exactly as he had said at dinner:

"Poor Miss Taylor! I wish she were here again. What a pity it is that Mr. Weston ever thought of her!"

"I cannot agree with you, papa; you know I cannot. Mr. Weston is such a good-humoured, pleasant, excellent man, that he thoroughly deserves a good wife; and you would not have had Miss Taylor live with us for ever, and bear all my odd humours,1 when she might have a house of her own?"

"A house of her own! but where is the advantage of a house of her own? This is three times as large; and you have never any odd humours, my dear."

"How often we shall be going to see them, and they coming to see us! We shall be always meeting! We must begin; we must go and pay our wedding-visit very soon."

"My dear, how am I to get so far? Randalls is such a distance. I could not walk half so far."

"No, papa; nobody thought of your walking. We must go in the carriage, to be sure."

"The carriage! But James will not like to put the horses to for such a little way; and where are the poor horses to be while we are paying our visit?"

"They are to be put into Mr. Weston's stable, papa. You know we have settled all that already. We talked it all over with Mr. Weston last night. And as for James, you may be very sure he will always like going to Randalls, because of his daughter's being housemaid there. I only doubt whether he will ever take us anywhere else. That was your doing, papa. You got Hannah that good place. Nobody thought of Hannah till you mentioned her-James is so obliged to you!"

"I am very glad I did think of her. It was very lucky, for I would not have had poor James think himself slighted upon any account; and I am sure she will make a very good servant; she is a civil, pretty-spoken girl; I have a great opinion of her. Whenever I see her, she always curtseys and asks me how I do, in a very pretty manner; and when you have had her here to do needlework, I observe she always turns the lock of the door the right way and never bangs it. I am sure she will be an excellent servant; and it will be a great comfort to poor Miss Taylor to have somebody about her that she is used to see. Whenever James goes over to his daughter, you know, she will be hearing of us. He will be able to tell her how we all are."

Emma spared no exertions to maintain this happier flow of ideas, and hoped, by the help of backgammon, to get her father tolerably through the evening, and be attacked by no regrets but her own. The backgammon-table was placed; but a visitor immediately afterwards walked in and made it unnecessary.

Mr. Knightley, a sensible man about seven or eight-and-thirty, was not only a very old and intimate friend of the family, but particularly connected with it, as the elder brother of Isabella's husband. He lived about a mile from Highbury, was a frequent visitor, and always welcome, and at this time more welcome than usual, as coming directly from their mutual connections in London. He had returned to a late dinner after some days' absence, and now walked up to Hartfield to say that all were well in Brunswick Square. It was a happy circumstance, and animated Mr. Woodhouse for some time. Mr. Knightley had a cheerful manner, which always did him good; and his many inquiries after "poor Isabella" and her children were answered most satisfactorily. When this was over, Mr. Woodhouse gratefully observed:

"It is very kind of you, Mr. Knightley, to come out at this late hour to call upon us. I am afraid you must have had a shocking walk."

"Not at all, sir. It is a beautiful moonlight night; and so mild that I must draw back from your great fire."

"But you must have found it very damp and dirty. I wish you may not catch cold."

"Dirty, sir! Look at my shoes. Not a speck on them."

"Well: that is quite surprising, for we have had a vast deal of rain here. It rained dreadfully hard for half an hour while we were at breakfast. I wanted them to put off the wedding."

"By the bye, I have not wished you joy. Being pretty well aware of what sort of joy you must both be feeling, I have been in no hurry with my congratulations; but I hope it all went off tolerably well. How did you all behave? Who cried most?"

"Ah! poor Miss Taylor! 'tis a sad business."

"Poor Mr. and Miss Woodhouse, if you please; but I cannot possibly say 'poor Miss Taylor.' I have a great regard for you and Emma; but when it comes to the question of dependence or independence! at any rate, it must be better to have only one to please than two."

"Especially when one of those two is such a fanciful, troublesome creature!" said Emma playfully. "That is what you have in your head, I know-and what you would certainly say if my father were not by."

"I believe it is very true, my dear, indeed," said Mr. Woodhouse, with a sigh. "I am afraid I am sometimes very fanciful and troublesome."

"My dearest papa! You do not think I could mean you, or suppose Mr. Knightley to mean you. What a horrible idea! Oh, no! I meant only myself. Mr. Knightley loves to find fault with me, you know-in a joke-it is all a joke. We always say what we like to one another."

Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse, and the only one who ever told her of them; and though this was not particularly agreeable to Emma herself, she knew it would be so much less so to her father, that she would not have him really suspect such a circumstance as her not being thought perfect by everybody.

"Emma knows I never flatter her," said Mr. Knightley, "but I meant no reflection on anybody. Miss Taylor has been used to have two persons to please; she will now have but one. The chances are that she must be a gainer."

"Well," said Emma, willing to let it pass, "you want to hear about the wedding; and I shall be happy to tell you, for we all behaved charmingly. Everybody was punctual, everybody in their best looks: not a tear, and hardly a long face to be seen. Oh, no; we all felt that we were going to be only half a mile apart, and were sure of meeting every day."

"Dear Emma bears everything so well," said her father. "But, Mr. Knightley, she is really very sorry to lose poor Miss Taylor, and I am sure she will miss her more than she thinks for."

Emma turned away her head, divided between tears and smiles.

"It is impossible that Emma should not miss such a companion," said Mr. Knightley. "We should not like her so well as we do, sir, if we could suppose it: but she knows how much the marriage is to Miss Taylor's advantage; she knows how very acceptable it must be, at Miss Taylor's time of life, to be settled in a home of her own, and how important to her to be secure of a comfortable provision, and therefore cannot allow herself to feel so much pain as pleasure. Every friend of Miss Taylor must be glad to have her so happily married."

"And you have forgotten one matter of joy to me," said Emma, "and a very considerable one-that I made the match myself. I made the match, you know, four years ago; and to have it take place, and be proved in the right, when so many people said Mr. Weston would never marry again, may comfort me for anything."

Mr. Knightley shook his head at her. Her father fondly replied, "Ah! my dear, I wish you would not make matches and foretell things, for whatever you say always comes to pass. Pray do not make any more matches."


From the Paperback edition.

Continues...

Excerpted from Emma by Jane Austen Copyright © 2007 by Jane Austen. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
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Table of Contents

About the Series v
About This Volume vii
About the Text xi
Part 1 Emma: The Complete Text in Cultural Context
Introduction: Biographical and Historical Contexts 3
The Complete Text 21
Contextual Documents and Illustrations 382
A Riddle 385
Robin Adair 386
from Unfortunate Situation of Females, Fashionably Educated, and Left without a Fortune. (1787) 387
from Letter to His Son (1750) 389
from Essays on the Picturesque (1810) 390
from Our Domestic Policy. No I. (1829) 391
Opinions of Emma (Ca. 1816) 392
Crossed Letter from Jane Austen to Cassandra (June 20, 1808) 398
The Frolics of the Sphynx (1820) 399
Square Pianoforte (1805) 400
A Barouche Landau (1805) 401
A View of Box Hill, Surrey (1733) 401
The Lincolnshire Ox (1790) 402
Part 2 Emma: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism
A Critical History of Emma 405
Gender Criticism and Emma 425
What Is Gender Criticism? 425
Gender Criticism: A Selected Bibliography 437
A Gender Studies Perspective: Claudia L. Johnson, "Not at all what a man should be!": Remaking English Manhood in Emma 441
Marxist Criticism and Emma 456
What Is Marxist Criticism? 456
Marxist Criticism: A Selected Bibliography 470
A Marxist Perspective: Beth Fowkes Tobin, Aiding Impoverished Gentlewomen: Power and Class in Emma 473
Cultural Criticism and Emma 488
What Is Cultural Criticism? 488
Cultural Criticism: A Selected Bibliography 503
A Cultural Perspective: Paul Delany, "A Sort of Notch in the Donwell Estate": Intersections of Status and Class in Emma 508
The New Historicism and Emma 524
What Is the New Historicism? 524
The New Historicism: A Selected Bibliography 538
A New Historicist Perspective: Casey Finch and Peter Bowen, "The Tittle-Tattle of Highbury": Gossip and the Free Indirect Style in Emma 543
Feminist Criticism and Emma 559
What Is Feminist Criticism? 559
Feminist Criticism: A Selected Bibliography 569
A Feminist Perspective: Devoney Looser, "The Duty of Woman by Woman": Reforming Feminism in Emma 577
Combining Perspectives on Emma 594
Combining Perspectives: Marilyn Butler, Introduction to Emma 597
Glossary of Critical and Theoretical Terms 615
About the Contributors 635
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Reading Group Guide

1. Describe the class and rank of various characters in the village of Highbury. Compare the positions of Mr. Weston, Mr. Elton, Miss Taylor, Harriet, and Emma with others in Highbury. How do matters of class affect the interaction of these characters, and would you describe class as being rigid or flexible as it is depicted by Jane Austen? To what extent can class be said to be of central importance to the development of the novel, since it is one of the most important considerations in marriage? Does class seem to be treated differently by those in Highbury than it does by outsiders, for example Frank Churchill and Mrs. Elton? Do you think it is significant that no woman in Highbury is of Emma's age and rank?

2. How does the relationship between Mr. Knightley and Emma change throughout the course of the novel? Although Austen does not directly tell us what their relationship was like during Emma's childhood, their long and intimate friendship is established at the novel's opening. In light of their occasional quarrels and Knightley's criticisms of Emma, for example, the criticism he made on Box Hill, how does Mr. Knightley feel about Emma? Do Mr. Knightley's feelings change as the novel progresses? If they do, what incidents account for the changes in his feelings?

3. Does Emma act as a good friend to Harriet Smith? Are Emma's concerns for Harriet's education and refinement born of an honest desire to help, or is it something less altruistic? Are Mr. Knightley's criticisms of Emma's interference with Mr. Martin's marriage proposal justified? Does Harriet ultimately benefit from Emma's friendship or her attempts to help her?

4. While matchmaking isthe central device in Emma, both for the plot and as a backdrop to develop characters, not all of the matches made in the novel are good. Compare the matches made between Mr. Weston and Miss Taylor, Emma and Mr. Knightley, Harriet and Mr. Martin, Jane Fairfax and Frank Churchill, and Mr. Elton and Mrs. Elton. Which are good matches and which are bad? What character traits in the couples make them suited or unsuited for each other? Why are the mismatches so important to the story?

5. In the final analysis, is Emma a sympathetic character? Does she seem to have good intentions only marred by a slight desire to interfere with other people's lives, or is she thoughtless and unconcerned with the effects she has on others? In your estimation, is Emma ultimately moral or immoral? What specific incidents in the novel lead you to that conclusion?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 395 )
Rating Distribution

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(208)

4 Star

(97)

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(51)

2 Star

(22)

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(17)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 448 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2010

    Here be a Knightly lover

    While I love Pride and Prejudice the best, Emma is definitely my second favorite of Ausent's works. I prefer the story of the former novel, but other than that I can say that I love, love, absolutely love Emma. As much as I adore Mr. Darcy (Along with every other female in the world) it must be confessed that I am madly in love with Mr. Knightly, and I read the entire book just for the scenes he is in. Although Pride and Prejudice can be called perfect, I find the Declaration-of-Love scene in Emma to be much more endearing and wonderful. I find that love of Pride and Prejudice generally has to be shared, since it is such a well known story, even to the most illiterate of people. As Emma is not as ubiquitously loved, I feel like the book has a more exclusive place in my heart, and that makes me love it all the more.

    19 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 11, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Emma

    Emma is a hilarious novel which I thoroughly enjoyed. As I escaped into the twists and turns of the social circle in Emma's small town, I found myself laughing, crying, berating characters, and gushing about how much I loved this book. Emma's blindness to what is going on around her in the way of love endears her even more. Emma is beautiful, charming, and what every young lady in those days ought to be. She's a dutiful daughter, and usually very proper, though she has a love of matchmaking, something she really isn't very good at. She encounters very memorable characters and finds herself in the end.

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2008

    Great Read

    This book is inscrutable.

    7 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    Need A Book You Can't Put Down?

    Jane Austen is one of the most talented novelists I know of. The first book I read by Austen is Pride and Prejudice, and when I had the opportunity to read another for pleasure as well as academics, I couldn’t pass it up. The novel, Emma, consists of advanced vocabulary and complex word phrasing, but with a dictionary by my side, nothing was in my way.

    Once I picked it up, it was hard to put it back down. In the novel Emma, Emma Woodhouse is the only lady in the house of many men. She therefore makes all the important decisions and has a degree of power and independence. Throughout the life of Emma, there are many situations in which any typical teenage girl can relate to. Emma doesn’t believe in finding her so called soul mate, so she meddles with others’ to help them find theirs. Regardless, she is admired and respected by all. One of the most powerful messages I acquired from this novel is learning that you cannot prevent the inevitable. Whatever road you are on is the one you are meant to take. To get to the man of her dreams, Mr. Knightley, it wasn't quite the simplest road ever. She goes through five weddings, a half-dozen major misunderstandings, and 400 pages pass before she learns of it, but Emma's ending is as happy and triumphant as the close of Pride and Prejudice.

    In the beginning of the book up until about the 250 page mark, the story is somewhat slow, but as Emma discovers that her love matchmaking isn’t quite working out for her, Mr. Knightley’s charm speeds up the book. Although the language is somewhat difficult to interpret, it's worth the read. The story is witty, charming and full of loveable characters. I guarantee that you will have the hardest time putting the book down.

    Although Emma is one of the longer books Jane Austen has written, it is inspirational in every way from beginning to end. It is a comedy of Emma as she learns to find her happily ever after. Emma is, without a doubt, one of the best books I have read in a very long time. I rarely ever have the time to pick up a well written book and read it from front to back, but I can honestly say that this book fulfilled that need; definitely a good book to pick up on a rainy weekend.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    review

    Only first half of book with lots of misprints

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Love this book!!!

    Emma loves matchmaking, but is not very good at it. She is entertaining to read about and this is very romantic. She steers her friend the wrong way, and is all jumbled up at first, but in the end it is fantastic and you will be glad you took the time to read it!! I highly recommend, no faults, and have fun reading this :)

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 29, 2010

    Emma... nothing vexing about her.

    This novel is my favorite by Miss Jane Austen. It is witty and entertaining. Despite what Miss Austen believed about her heroine in this novel, Miss Emma Woodhouse is endearing and well loved by readers.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2013

    Stop

    Please stop chatting if you want to chat go txt on your phones

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2012

    Badly formatted

    Odd characters interspursed with text. Words are mashed up.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Witty, Charming, Exciting

    Jane Austen truly expresses her greatest knack for writing in her novel, Emma. Miss Woodhouse's character as well as the characters of Miss Smith, Mr. Knightley, and others show great contrast, yet great coordination and interaction between each other. Emma is definitely a must-read for everyone, from those who hardly ever have time to read to the most dedicated bibliophiles.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Pretty good stuff

    I loved Emma. Then again, I also loved Clueless, and guess which one was easier to get through?

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2006

    Emma

    READER BEWARE! This is one of the best of only 6 amazing completed masterpieces by Jane Austen. Despite being written so long ago Jane Austen¿s work can be as engaging (and even addicting) as any modern novel. Read this treasured title with care as the author will be unable to write another.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2005

    MY ALL-TIME FAVORITE!

    I LOVE EMMA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It is an exquisite book. I had a very hard time putting it down.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2014

    Safety of The Children Inc.

    Kids like 10+ use these so when they open up classics to buy them and look at the reviews to see if there good and all they see is YOUR nasty,racist,innapropiate comments and reviews. Reviews are to tell how much you liked the book not to be weird or gross. I think this book is gping to be GREAT. THAT is a review people!!!!! THAT IS A REVIEW!! Now spread the word is you agree with me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2014

    Revengeclaw

    Name: look,also called rc or Silver
    Gender &male
    Age:More than 10 moons still young.
    Looks:black coat with white paws
    Personality:sarcastic
    Weakness: doesnt kill anyone. Is it a curse?
    History:one day joined by keeping prisoners and has had fun adventures,includong saving Outpaw(cast) from being forcemated by pretending to be one.
    Family-never mated,unknown father and mother, one sister.
    Theme:Darth Vader's theme :)

    -Rc &#987654321

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2014

    Wrathclaws bio

    I am a black tom of 16 moons. My eyes are a rare mutation of an almost black color. I have been an assasin for the past eight moons. I was trained by strikikg and thistlefang of bloodclan and am very well at what i do. I am extreemly loyal to those of my clan and to those i consider friends. I can be laid back or very stuffy depending om who im talking to. I am a valeuable asset and a terrifying enemy. I went by the names of si and midnight when i was in the clan at first, but i have changed. So i changed my name to.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2014

    &beta &upsilon &real &alefsym &iota &alefsym G &sub &iota &alefsym D &xi &real

    Name..Burning Cinder <p> Gender.. &female <p> Appearence..jetblack with red and orange flame patterens on her legs and ears <p> Mate/Crush/Kits..nope <p> Family..all murdered by guess who? <p> History..why do you care but if you ask i might tell you a little <p> Age..about 20 moons maybe less <p> Eyes..scarlet <p> Theme song..Good life <p> Signiture.. &#9820 &#9758 &beta &upsilon &real &alefsym &iota &alefsym G &sub &iota &alefsym D &xi &real &#9746 &#9820

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2014

    &starf Jace's Bio &starf

    Name- Jace Morningstar<br>Age- ?<br>Gender- &male <br>Appearance- A Black Tom With Tawny Eyes <br>Other- Ask<br>Signature- &starf &image&alpha<_>c&omega &#8499<_>0&Gamma&#8745<_>l&#8745<_>GST&#8704&Gamma

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2014

    Polar's Bio

    Name ~|• Mudda Trucker............do you even look up?
    <p>
    Age ~|• Yawn............okay like only 6 moons old
    <p>
    Gender ~|• Female
    <p>
    Looks ~|• since you want to admire from afar..cough stalker cough......her pelt is pure white, in the sun light it has tinges of blue. Her fur is not to short nor to long, her tail is long. Claws are sharp, her eyes are Violet with greenish flecks. her nose and paw pads are pink..
    <p>
    Crush ~|• nuuuuu
    <p>
    Mate ~|• nuuuuuuu
    <p>
    Kits ~|• heck nah
    <p>
    History ~|• stop stalking
    <p>
    Kin ~|•........i have no idea......
    <p>
    Other askkkkkkkk
    <p>
    Anthem ----------- Grizabella the glamour cat from the broadway production of cats............GrowlTigers last stand from the production cats

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2014

    Death's bio

    Name: Death <p> Age: 23 Moons <p> Gender: F &female male <p> Kin: <p> Mother: FishTail <p> Father: Thats a good question... <p> Siblings: BadgerFang <p> Nieces: AmberStar + DancingRiver <p> Kits: Dewkit, FlamingKit <p> Personality: If you're still reading this, im considering you a stalker. Well anywho, Death is sarcastic, a little insane, and funny. She's also very talkative. <p> Looks: A pure black cat that is tall and lean and she has amber eyes. <p> Mate: No...You're definitely a stalker... <p> Crush:No....Im dialing 911... <p> Kits: You're starting to scare me.... <p> History:You don't need to know. <p> Death

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