Emma (Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Series) / Edition 1

Emma (Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Series) / Edition 1

by Jane Austen, Alistair M. Duckworth
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0312207573

ISBN-13: 9780312207571

Pub. Date: 09/24/2001

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

This new edition of Jane's Austen's 19th-century British novel presents the 1816 text along with contemporary critical essays that introduce students to Emma from gender, new historical, Marxist, cultural, and feminist perspectives. An additional essay demonstrates how various critical perspectives can be combined. The text and essays are complemented by contextual

Overview

This new edition of Jane's Austen's 19th-century British novel presents the 1816 text along with contemporary critical essays that introduce students to Emma from gender, new historical, Marxist, cultural, and feminist perspectives. An additional essay demonstrates how various critical perspectives can be combined. The text and essays are complemented by contextual documents, introductions (with bibliographies), and a glossary of critical and theoretical terms.

Author Biography: Alistair M. Duckworth is a professor of English at the University of Florida, Gainesville.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312207571
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date:
09/24/2001
Series:
Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
638
Sales rank:
319,033
Product dimensions:
5.53(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.86(d)

Table of Contents

About the Series
About This Volume
About the Text
 
Part One: Emma: The Complete Text in Cultural Context

Introduction: Biographical and Historical Contexts
The Complete Text
Cultural Documents and Illustrations
     Dave Garrick, A Riddle
     Robin Adair
     Mary Wollestonecraft, from Unfortunate Situation of Females, Fashionably Educated, and Left without a Fortune (1787)
     Philip Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield, from Letter to his Son (1750)
     Uvedale Price, from Essay on the Picturesque (1810)
     Robert Southey, from Our Domestic Policy No. 1 (1829)
     Opinions of Emma (Ca. 1816)
     Crossed Letter from Jane Austen to Cassandra (June 20, 1808)
     The Frolics of the Sphinx (1820)
     Square Pianoforte (1805)
     A Barouche Landau (1805)
     George Lambert, A View of Box Hill, Surrey (1733)
     George Stubbs, The Lincolnshire Ox (1790)
 
Part Two: Emma: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism

A Critical History of Emma
Gender Studies and Emma 
     What Is Gender Studies?
     Gender Studies: A Selected Bibliography
     A Gender Studies Perspective:
          Claudia L. Johnson, “Not at all what a man should be!”:  Remaking English Manhood in Emma
Marxist Criticism and Emma
     What Is Marxist Criticism?
     Marxist Criticism:  A Selected Bibliography
     A Marxist Perspective:
          Beth Fowkes Tobin, Aiding Impoverished Gentlewomen: Power and Class in Emma
Cultural Criticism and Emma
     What Is Cultural Criticism?
     Cultural Criticism:  A Selective Bibliography
     A Cultural Critic's Perspective:
          Paul Delany, “A Sort of Notch in the Donwell Estate”: Intersections of Status and Class in Austen's Emma
The New Historicism and Emma
     What Is New Historicism?
     New Historicism:  A Selected Bibliography
     A New Historical Perspective:
          Peter Finch and Casey Bowen, “The Tittle-Tattle of Highbury”: Gossip and the Free Indirect Style in Emma
Feminist Criticism and Emma
     What Is Feminist Criticism?
     Feminist Criticism: A Selected Bibliography
     A Feminist Perspective:
          Devoney Looser, “The Duty of Woman by Woman”:  Reforming Feminism in Emma
Combining Critical Perspectives on Emma 
     Combining Perspectives:
          Marilyn Butler, An Introduction to Emma
 
Glossary of Critical and Theoretical Terms
About the Contributors

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