Emma / Edition 2

Emma / Edition 2

4.2 5
by Jane Austen
     
 

ISBN-10: 0192824325

ISBN-13: 9780192824325

Pub. Date: 09/28/1995

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

A lively young heiress takes up matchmaking, and her schemes result in comic confusion for a social-climbing parson, a chatterbox spinster, an enigmatic Romeo, and other inhabiatants of a 19th-century English village. Sparkling satire in one of Austen's finest novels

Sparkling comedy of provincial manners concerns a well-intentioned young heiress and her…  See more details below

Overview

A lively young heiress takes up matchmaking, and her schemes result in comic confusion for a social-climbing parson, a chatterbox spinster, an enigmatic Romeo, and other inhabiatants of a 19th-century English village. Sparkling satire in one of Austen's finest novels

Sparkling comedy of provincial manners concerns a well-intentioned young heiress and her matchmaking schemes that result in comic confusion for the inhabitants of a 19th-century English village. Droll characterizations of the well-intentioned heroine-one of Austen's immortal creations-and her hypochondriacal father-plus many other finely drawn personalities. This sparkling satire of provincial life is one of Jane Austen's finest novels.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780192824325
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
09/28/1995
Series:
World's Classics Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
488
Product dimensions:
4.56(w) x 7.31(h) x 0.82(d)

Table of Contents

About the Seriesv
About This Volumevii
About the Textxi
Part 1Emma: The Complete Text in Cultural Context
Introduction: Biographical and Historical Contexts3
The Complete Text21
Contextual Documents and Illustrations382
A Riddle385
Robin Adair386
from Unfortunate Situation of Females, Fashionably Educated, and Left without a Fortune. (1787)387
from Letter to His Son (1750)389
from Essays on the Picturesque (1810)390
from Our Domestic Policy. No I. (1829)391
Opinions of Emma (Ca. 1816)392
Crossed Letter from Jane Austen to Cassandra (June 20, 1808)398
The Frolics of the Sphynx (1820)399
Square Pianoforte (1805)400
A Barouche Landau (1805)401
A View of Box Hill, Surrey (1733)401
The Lincolnshire Ox (1790)402
Part 2Emma: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism
A Critical History of Emma405
Gender Criticism and Emma425
What Is Gender Criticism?425
Gender Criticism: A Selected Bibliography437
A Gender Studies Perspective: Claudia L. Johnson, "Not at all what a man should be!": Remaking English Manhood in Emma441
Marxist Criticism and Emma456
What Is Marxist Criticism?456
Marxist Criticism: A Selected Bibliography470
A Marxist Perspective: Beth Fowkes Tobin, Aiding Impoverished Gentlewomen: Power and Class in Emma473
Cultural Criticism and Emma488
What Is Cultural Criticism?488
Cultural Criticism: A Selected Bibliography503
A Cultural Perspective: Paul Delany, "A Sort of Notch in the Donwell Estate": Intersections of Status and Class in Emma508
The New Historicism and Emma524
What Is the New Historicism?524
The New Historicism: A Selected Bibliography538
A New Historicist Perspective: Casey Finch and Peter Bowen, "The Tittle-Tattle of Highbury": Gossip and the Free Indirect Style in Emma543
Feminist Criticism and Emma559
What Is Feminist Criticism?559
Feminist Criticism: A Selected Bibliography569
A Feminist Perspective: Devoney Looser, "The Duty of Woman by Woman": Reforming Feminism in Emma577
Combining Perspectives on Emma594
Combining Perspectives: Marilyn Butler, Introduction to Emma597
Glossary of Critical and Theoretical Terms615
About the Contributors635

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Emma (Oxford World's Classics Series) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
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For me, reading Jane Austen¿s novel Emma is a delight. However, not all readers have been in agreement with me over the years including Jane Austen herself who warned her family before publication ¿I am going to take a heroine whom no-one but myself will much like.¿ She was of course making fun of herself in her own satirical way - her critics on the other hand, were quite serious. When the book was published in 1815, Austen sent a copy to her contemporary author Maria Edgeworth who gave up reading the novel after the first volume, passing it on to friend and complaining, ¿There is no story in it.¿ Others had mixed feelings offering both praise and blame for its focus on the ordinary details of a few families in a country village. One important advocate of Emma was Sir Walter Scott, whose essay published in the Quarterly Review of 1815 represents the most important criticism on Austen¿s writing during her lifetime. Even though the review was published anonymously, she must have been quite giddy when the reviewer heralded her Emma as a `new style of novel¿ designed to `suit modern times¿. Heady stuff to be sure. When it was later learned that Scott had contributed the review, it would placed Jane Austen in a whole other league of writers. Emma can be enjoyed on different levels, and for pure humour and witty dialogue it may reign as Austen¿s supreme triumph. Just Google quotes from Emma and you might agree that it has the best bon mots of any of her novels. Modern critics claim it as her masterpiece, and I do not doubt it. Pride and Prejudice may be the most beloved and well know of her works, but Emma represents Austen at the height of her writing skill and power as a story teller. Like some of Austen¿s contemporaries, the modern reader might find challenges in its minutiae and supposed lack of story. Not to worry. There are many sources available to assist in understanding Jane Austen¿s subtle and often witty dialogue, her unique characterizations, and help place the novel in historical context. One source to consider is the new 2008 edition of Emma, by Oxford World¿s Classics. Recently revised in 2003, this re-issue contains the same supplemental and textual material with a newly designed cover. For a reader seeking a medium level of support to help them along in their understanding you will be happy to find a thoughtful 23 page introduction by associate Professor of English and Women¿s Studies Adela Pinch of the University of Michigan. The essay contains a brief introduction, and segments on Shopping and Suburbia, Narrative Voices: Gossip and the Individual, The Politics of Knowledge, and Emma: Much Ado About Nothing?. Her emphasis is on understanding Austen¿s choice of writing about the ordinary and extraordinary aspects of the lives of its heroine Emma Woodhouse and her circle of family and friends in Highbury, a small English village in which she sets about to match make for all of its singletons blundering hilariously along the way. I particularly appreciated Prof. Pinch¿s positive comments throughout the essay. ¿Austen makes voices stick in the mind through her use of free indirect discourse, which makes character¿s voice seem indelible, capable of soaking into other beings. But she also uses the same technique for representing thought. Her cultivation of this mode of representing her heroines¿ minds has made her novels crucial to the history of the English novel, markers of a movement when the novel as a literary genre perfects its inward turn, and begins to claim human psychology as its territory. Above all it creates the feeling of intimacy with her heroines that many readers prize.¿ Page xvii-xviii If I may be so bold and interject as the everyman Austen reader for a moment, parts of this essay are scholarly and touch on areas beyond my immediate understanding, especially when she delves into the philosophical and psychological pedantry. For the most part, Prof. Pinch¿s essay is written in accessib