Emma: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists

( 10 )

Overview

Imagine a couple young hacktivists, both former members of the internet freedom fighters group Anonymous, and one of them an ex-black ops officer, breaking away and creating a militant group of anarchists committed to social change. But social change precipitated by acts of violence against CEOs of major corporations responsible for crimes against humanity.

Their group, Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists, or EMMA, believes the power elite will never listen to hollow ...

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EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists

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Overview

Imagine a couple young hacktivists, both former members of the internet freedom fighters group Anonymous, and one of them an ex-black ops officer, breaking away and creating a militant group of anarchists committed to social change. But social change precipitated by acts of violence against CEOs of major corporations responsible for crimes against humanity.

Their group, Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists, or EMMA, believes the power elite will never listen to hollow threats or become intimidated by pranksters like Anonymous. They will listen only when they are forced to live in a state of terror.

That's the mere skeleton of the plot, but what follows, the twists and turns, the surprises, the action and suspense, and the masterful way the author delves into the lives of the principal characters, adds the beef.

A black ops officer turned terrorist is not the story of a renegade NCS commando gone bonkers. Rather the novel tells of a young man, Brent Cossack, accepted into Georgetown University, who decides to forgo college and join the military. As a CIA operative in Iraq, he discovers an ugly truth, and resigns. He returns home and falls in love with a beautiful political activist. Everything seems just swell, until a terrible event in his life pushes him over the edge.

FBI agent Rick Clark finds himself in the middle of an investigation that forces him to relive the saddest time in his life. Since his divorce, he has lived alone, avoiding relationships, except those established at work out of necessity, and one established at home, out of choice, with his commiserating dog, Thomas.

Marty Robins, a psychologist involved in the investigation, helps resuscitate life into Rick, but his real savior comes later in the form of an unexpected hero that restores hope and meaning in his fragmented life.

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Editorial Reviews

Maria Beltran
Michael Segedy's novel is an action-packed thriller. Using the Internet as a weapon, a group of political activists start hacking websites to effect social change. Believing that this is not enough, a break away group brings it to the next level, assassinating corporate heads who they believe are guilty of crimes against humanity. What sends a chill through my spine is the possibility of this story becoming a reality.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781482576344
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 3/22/2013
  • Pages: 298
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Most of his adult life, Michael has lived overseas (Peru, Morocco, Israel, and Taiwan) teaching high school literature and technology.

Michael has published numerous academic articles about literature and writing, and In 1985, Gwendolyn Brooks, poet laureate of Illinois, presented him with Virginia English Bulletin's first place writing award.

He has also written four novels, Hampton Road, Evil's Root, Cupiditas, In Deep, Emma: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists

Michael and his family currently live in Lima, Peru, and with his family's support and encouragement he hopes soon to begin his third novel.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

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(8)

4 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 10, 2013

    A wonderful thriller full of adventure, romance, political and s

    A wonderful thriller full of adventure, romance, political and social themes. If you love crime novels, in particular, cybercrime novels, you'll love this one. The plot is suspenseful and engaging and the characters memorable. I put it high on my list.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists by Michael Segedy

    EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists by Michael Segedy is every bit as exciting as you’d expect a novel by this talented author to be. A group of political anarchists –embracing a philosophy that holds the state to be unnecessary at best and harmful at worst - use the Web as a tool to achieve what they see as improvements in society. However, within the ranks are some extremists who will only be happy if corporate figures they see as evil are removed permanently. The key figure in the action is Brent Cossack, a CIA operative who is forced to resign after becoming disillusioned at discovering some grim truths about American foreign policy. Events conspire to keep him on the edge. Another somewhat disillusioned man, FBI agent Rick Clark, while trying to forget tough personal circumstances, becomes intimately involved in the action. He turns to a psychologist for support and help comes from another quarter too.




    The book has everything a modern high-tech thriller needs: computers, terrorists groups, reference to recent actual figures and events, corporate baddies, fanatics driven too far, and troubled but competent, strong, moral investigators. There is breathless tension by the truckload and plenty of high emotion, but it also has pathos and genuinely moving moments. Segedy always creates complex, convincing characters with enough emotional baggage to make them interesting but not crippled. He plunges these individuals into thoroughly researched and imaginative yet disturbingly realistic and plausible scenarios to keep his readers glued to the pages. Even the chapter headings show the thought that this author puts into his work and help keep every word he uses charged with energy and interest. If you haven’t already realized from this review, let me tell you that this book is frankly brilliant and you really should read it.

    Reviewed by Stephanie Dagg

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 14, 2013

    EMMA a tough, sly thriller EMMA is a tough, sly book about home

    EMMA a tough, sly thriller

    EMMA is a tough, sly book about home-grown terrorism. Most thrillers are simplistic fantasies with little grounding in real world experience. They grab you by the lapels, but the characters rarely live up to the plot. There will some kind of game set up by the bad guy, which will end in godawful catastrophe if it succeeds. It fails because a good guy comes along, and events race along through a dream-world in which brave, red-blooded clear-minded conservative men come together to secure the situation in the nick of time while waving the flag.

    This two-dimensional patriotism is rooted in a kind of island psychology created by our geographic isolation. But the really good spy novels are international, which is why the best ones in English have been written by Brits living cheek by jowl with the French, Germans et al. No American espionage writer can go the distance with real heavyweights like Graham Green, John Le Carre or Len Deighton. Michael Segedy isn’t there yet but he’s coming on, and EMMA is as promising as anything I’ve come across in this century. In his way he’s as international as John Burdett, the young expat Brit master. You don’t get the Bangkok chongos or Zen excursions, but the deadly cultural critique is there, along with action that periodically explodes out of nowhere. Segedy has lived much of his adult life abroad, and it’s in his books. He understands the dirty little secret of how big business hooks up with politics and war, and lays it out. It’s the real world, not some quasi-historic quasi-religious mumbo-jumbo.

    At his best, Segedy works your forebrain and the primal section all at once, which he can do because he’s done the thinking we tend to avoid. He comes up with some rather shocking and intelligent stuff that keeps you reading, the funky reality of how things actually happen, and what happens when things go wrong. If you wanted to know what Iraq is like, and what it does to the people we send there, buckle your seat belt, because that’s the heart and guts of EMMA, Segedy’s acronym for Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists. Emma Goldman was the leading anarchist of her time, a notoriously hard-nosed celeb who attempted to assassinate Henry Frick, a malefactor of great wealth. And lest we forget, Emma is a Jane Austen classic – Segedy’s assortment of academic degrees have not killed his sense of humor.

    Brent Cossack is a stand-up American guy who puts off college and goes to Iraq because his folks don’t have the money to put him through school. He’s smart and talented, serves his hitch, returns, and then steps into another world, with a job most people can’t handle. He does it, but when he finds out what’s really going on, he has a problem, because he just isn’t a mercenary type. He’s been used, and it’s eating at him. Between his tech aptitude and an attractive woman, he becomes involved with Anonymous. From there he graduates to EMMA, which does not limit itself to internet attacks.

    While Cossack is living that life, Rick Clark, a guy not unlike himself in many ways, is working for the FBI, trying to figure out some curious assassinations in which the killing has been done by weapons associated with the victims, corporate execs in the military industrial complex and arms trade. It’s a kind of hard-core poetic justice for people who profit from helping kill other people for money. Like Cossack, Clark is smart, and another a loner of sorts, his wife having left him because he’s too much into his job to be in a relationship. Like Cossack, he has an empty life until he becomes involved with and influenced by a woman with a mind of her own. Segedy’s sense of humor comes out again in the tech-expert partner that Clark has been saddled with, a twisted dick.

    The surgical assassination of war-profiteers is hard to get very excited about in this century, given the scale of their crimes. But EMMA turns to politically motivated mass murders, lifting the story to a desperate urgency in which hunter and hunted both seek a vicious, elusive psychopath who has seized the reins at EMMA. His line of work and his depersonalized thinking rub our noses in the nastiness of tech-worship/addiction. Which is interesting, because Segedy is professionally knowledgeable about computer technology.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2013

    great read!

    great read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 23, 2013

    Michael Segedy portrays his intricate characters in a deeply per

    Michael Segedy portrays his intricate characters in a deeply personal way. The life lesson I learned from this book is: everyone has a backstory that has shaped them. Michael helps the reader feel empathy for the "bad" guy in the story. The ending is truly touching.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 12, 2013

    Reviewed by Maria Beltran for Readers' Favorite Mark Bernstein,

    Reviewed by Maria Beltran for Readers' Favorite

    Mark Bernstein, an oil magnate who financed death squads in Nigeria is assassinated. Next on the list is Ken Farrow, the CEO of AAT Corporation, who has supplied rebels in the Congo with genocidal weapons. This is how the novel EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists, an action thriller about a disillusioned black-ops CIA operative, unfolds. When CIA agent Brent Cossack uncovers an anomaly in American foreign policy, he immediately leaves the service. He returns home and falls in love with Sabrina, an attractive political activist. Eventually, they join Anonymous, a clandestine group involved in hacking. 

    Michael Segedy's novel is an action-packed thriller. Using the Internet as a weapon, a group of political activists start hacking websites to effect social change. Believing that this is not enough, EMMA, a break away group, brings it to the next level, assassinating corporate heads who they believe are guilty of crimes against humanity. What sends a chill through my spine is the possibility of this story becoming a reality. The story is told in such a way that the reader is gripped by the urgency of the protagonist's situation. This is because the reader sympathizes with the main characters. A compelling plot and sympathetic characters are two elements of that make this narrative difficult to put down. It is a compelling read, from start to finish. In fact, this is one of those novels that will linger in the subconscious long after the reader has finished reading the story. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 12, 2013

    Reviewed by Eduardo Aduna for Readers' Favorite Michael Segedy┬┐

    Reviewed by Eduardo Aduna for Readers' Favorite

    Michael Segedy’s "EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists" is a gritty look at modern day vigilantism using technology to right wrongs on a global scale. Ex-government bagman Brent Cossack now works for EMMA, an organization that doesn't let their sense of morality stop them from doing what they think is right. Rick Clark, FBI CID operative, is on the other end of the spectrum, a straight-laced cop who finds himself questioning his role in the current status quo. These two players live in a world where online information can lead to real world assassinations. Circumstances have made their professional and personal lives cross, resulting in a fast-paced adventure in the underbelly of the underground techno-anarchist movement.

    Michael Segedy’s "EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists" can be seen by some as an incisive commentary on the foreign policy of today’s superpowers. Characters live so deep in the gray zone that black and white fade, and right and wrong become inevitably obscured. The book presents a relevant what-if scenario: what if hacktivism is not enough? What if the people who use technology to right wrongs themselves fall prey to the lure of absolute dominion over their chosen battleground? Michael Segedy’s talent for creating multi-faceted characters with comprehensive back stories again manifests itself. The way he weaves the stories of his characters into one compelling narrative is simply masterful. I had goose bumps while reading several of the twists and turns that the novel has. The thriller has enough action and suspense to keep readers hooked, though perhaps the main thing that drew me in is the intellectual foundation that serves as the novel’s framework. "EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists" is a thriller that deals with relevant issues which are sure to keep readers wondering long after the last page is turned.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 12, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Stephanie Dagg for Readers' Favorite "EMMA: Em

    Reviewed by Stephanie Dagg for Readers' Favorite

    "EMMA: Emergent Movement of Militant Anarchists" by Michael Segedy is every bit as exciting as you’d expect a novel by this talented author to be. A group of political anarchists - in the true sense of the word as meaning a political philosophy that holds the state to be unnecessary at best and harmful at worst - use the Web as a tool to achieve what they see as improvements in society. However, within the ranks are some extremists who will only be happy if corporate figures they see as evil are removed permanently. The key figure in the action is Brent Cossack, a CIA operative who is forced to resign after becoming disillusioned at discovering some grim truths in his work. Events conspire to keep him on the edge. Another somewhat disillusioned man, FBI agent Rick Clark, is trying to forget tough personal circumstances and becomes involved in the action. He turns to his psychologist for support and help comes from another quarter too.

    The book has everything a modern high-tech thriller needs: computers, terrorists groups, reference to recent actual figures and events, corporate baddies, fanatics driven too far and troubled but competent strong, moral investigators. There is breathless tension by the truckload and plenty of high emotion, but it also has pathos and genuinely moving moments. Segedy always creates complex, convincing characters with enough emotional baggage to make them interesting but not crippled. He plunges these rounded individuals into thoroughly researched and imaginative yet disturbingly realistic and plausible scenarios to keep his readers glued to the pages. Even the chapter headings show the thought that this author puts into his work and help keep every word he uses charged with energy and interest. If you haven’t already realized from this review, let me tell you that this book is frankly brilliant and you really should read it.
     

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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