Emotion as Meaning: The Literary Case for How We Imagine

Overview

"Emotion as Meaning offers a new model of the mind based upon a new understanding of emotion. It resolves the debate between the imagists and propositionalists by tracing the translation of language into vicarious experience, showing that the mind represents its imagined world by means of not only image and idea but emotion." "Until twenty years ago, most believed that we imagine within the medium of language. Then psychologists like Allan Paivio and Stephen Kosslyn showed that we think also by means of images, triggering a debate between the
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Overview

"Emotion as Meaning offers a new model of the mind based upon a new understanding of emotion. It resolves the debate between the imagists and propositionalists by tracing the translation of language into vicarious experience, showing that the mind represents its imagined world by means of not only image and idea but emotion." "Until twenty years ago, most believed that we imagine within the medium of language. Then psychologists like Allan Paivio and Stephen Kosslyn showed that we think also by means of images, triggering a debate between the propositionalists, who define thought in terms of idea (or word), and the imagists, who insist we think in picture-like ways." Opdahl shows that emotion represents elements that elude those two codes: relationships, intangible mental states, large entities like cities or eras, and - always - context or background. Emotion provides the primary mode of the identifying reader, as he or she shares the emotions of the protagonist.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780838755211
  • Publisher: Bucknell University Press
  • Publication date: 12/1/2002
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface 9
Acknowledgments 13
Pt. I The Mental Construction of Meaning
1 Imagining the Text 19
2 The Mental Display of Meaning 24
3 The Debate: Theories of Mental Construction 33
4 Double Your Pleasure: Paivio or Kosslyn? 46
Pt. II The Affective Code
5 Feeling Our Way: Emotional Construction 59
6 The Intellectual Landscape I 74
7 The Intellectual Landscape II 86
8 The Affective Code: A Model and a Method 97
Pt. III The Affective Imagination: Five Premises
9 Language as Emotion in "Big Two-Hearted River" 111
10 Shared Emotion in Pride and Prejudice 124
11 Precise Emotion in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 141
12 Objective Emotion in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 152
13 Relation in The Portrait of a Lady 165
Pt. IV Toward a Practical Criticism
14 An Affective Criticism 183
15 A Critic's Notebook: Beloved and the Functions of Emotion 201
16 Imagining The Centaur: Fusion and Meaning 217
17 Conclusion 230
Notes 235
Bibliography 271
Index 288
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