Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence: Educational Implications / Edition 1

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Overview

In recent years, innovative schools have developed courses in what has been termed emotional literacy, emotional intelligence, or emotional competence. This volume evaluates these developments scientifically, pairing the perspectives of psychologists with those of educators who offer valuable commentary on the latest research. It is an authoritative study that describes the scientific basis for our knowledge about emotion as it relates specifically to children, the classroom environment, and emotional literacy.Key topics include: historical perspectives on emotional intelligence neurological bases for emotional development the development of social skills and childhood socialization of emotion. Experts in psychology and education have long viewed thinking and feeling as polar opposites reason on the one hand, and passion on the other. And emotion, often labeled as chaotic, haphazard, and immature, has not traditionally been seen as assisting reason.All that changed in 1990, when Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer coined the term emotional intelligence as a challenge to the belief that intelligence is not based on processing emotion-laden information. Salovey and Mayer defined emotional intelligence as the ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use motivated scientists, educators, parents, and many others to consider the ways in which emotions themselves comprise an intelligent system.With this groundbreaking volume, invited contributors present cutting-edge research on emotions and emotional development in a manner useful to educators, psychologists, and anyone interested in the unfolding of emotions during childhood. In recent years, innovative schools have developed courses in “emotional literacy” that making; these classes teach children how to understand and manage their feelings and how to get along with one another. Many such programs have achieved national prominence, and preliminary scientific evaluations have shown promising results.Until recently, however, there has been little contact between educators developing these types of programs and psychologists studying the neurological underpinnings and development of human emotions. This unique book links theory and practice by juxtaposing scientific explanations of emotion with short commentaries from educators who elaborate on how these advances can be put to use in the classroom.Accessible and enlightening, Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence provides ample evidence about emotional intelligence as well as sound information on the potential efficacy of educational programs based on this idea.

Emotional competence & self-regulation in childhood, developmental & interpersonal considerations, etc.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465095872
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 6/28/1997
  • Edition description: 1 ED
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,036,452
  • Lexile: 1520L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.48 (w) x 9.56 (h) x 1.16 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Salovey, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology and director of graduate studies in psychology at Yale University. David Sluyter, Ph.D., is the program director at the Fetzer Institute in Kalamazoo, MI.

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Table of Contents

Contributors
A Note from the Editors
Foreword
1 What Is Emotional Intelligence? 3
Educator's Commentary 32
2 Emotional Competence and Self-Regulation in Childhood 35
Educator's Commentary 67
3 Friends, Diplomats, and Leaders in Kindergarten: Interpersonal Intelligence in Play 70
Educator's Commentary 90
4 Brain Development and Emotional Development: The Role of Teaching in Organizing the Frontal Lobe 93
Educator's Commentary 120
5 Emotional Responding: Regulation, Social Correlates, and Socialization 129
Educator's Commentary 164
6 Emotion Regulation During Childhood: Developmental, Interpersonal, and Individual Considerations 168
Educator's Commentary 193
7 Promoting Children's Social-Emotional Adjustment with Peers 196
Educator's Commentary 225
8 The Questions of Development in Emotion 233
Educator's Commentary 254
9 Linking Research and Educational Programming to Promote Social and Emotional Learning 257
Educator's Commentary 275
Index 279
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