Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

by Anthony Mersino
     
 

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Research indicates that emotional intelligence (EI) accounts for an astonishing 70-80 percent of management success. Technical expertise just isn’t enough anymore: project managers need strong interpersonal skills and the ability to recognize emotional cues in order to lead their teams to success.

Emotional

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Overview

Research indicates that emotional intelligence (EI) accounts for an astonishing 70-80 percent of management success. Technical expertise just isn’t enough anymore: project managers need strong interpersonal skills and the ability to recognize emotional cues in order to lead their teams to success.

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers introduces readers to all facets of EI and shows how emotions can be leveraged to meet project goals. They’ll learn how to:

• Set the tone and direction for the project

• Communicate effectively

• Motivate, inspire, and engage their team

• Encourage flexibility and collaboration

• Deal productively with stress, criticism, and change

• Establish the kind of high morale that attracts top performers

• And more

The second edition includes several expanded sections on self-awareness and self-management, as well as a new chapter on using EI to lead Agile Teams and a close look at Servant Leadership. Without the people skills necessary to lead effectively, even the most care fully orchestrated project can fall apart. This indispensable guide gives project managers the tools they need to create winning teams and get the job done right and on time.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“This book about professional development is personal, insightful, and well-organized. It is a helpful and viable tool book for PM and team leaders” --PM World Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780814432778
Publisher:
AMACOM Books
Publication date:
06/06/2013
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1 My Growth in Emotional Intelligence A Dangerous Situation "Do you have any idea how dangerous it is not to be in touch with your feelings?" This question was posed to me in the summer of 2001 by Rich, a therapist who has since become my career coach and mentor. His words stopped me in my tracks. Dangerous? That was a curious word choice. What could be dangerous about not being in touch with my feelings? I was thirty-nine years old and had been a successful project manager (PM) for over seventeen years. I had a record of slow but steady career progression. I had been certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) since 1995. I owned my own project management consulting business and lived, taught, and even breathed project management. No one had ever asked me about feelings before. No one had ever mentioned that there might be danger involved. What could be dangerous? What was so important about feelings? Rich's question resonated with me, but I wasn't sure why. It didn't feel dangerous to be out of touch with my emotions. However, I had a nagging sense that he saw or knew things that I didn't. On some level I recognized that the way I approached work wasn't always effective. Hard work did not always make the difference in the outcomes of the projects I managed. I wondered how others seemed to succeed with less effort. I also felt insecure about the lack of personal and professional relationships I had built, and I suspected that it was hurting me. As much as I wanted to deny that my career and relationship challenges might be related to my emotions, I began to sus-pect that Rich might be right. The truth was that I wasn't aware of my feelings or emotions. I was about as emotionally aware as a small green soap dish. If I could have taken an emotional intelligence test at that time, I would have been considered the village idiot. With Rich's help, I began to see a connection between my lack of emotional awareness and my limited success in project management. Up to that point, my project management career had been a bumpy road. While not quite a dead end street, my career path hadn't exactly taken a superhighway either. Lately that road didn't seem to be taking me anywhere. I had recently been passed over for a key promotion at Unisys. My career ladder had literally run out of rungs. Perhaps I had been promoted to my level of incompetence and was therefore living proof of the Peter Principle. Eventually I found I could no longer ignore Rich's question about the danger, and I decided to do something about it. I knew I needed to make some changes. I was ready to make more of an investment in my emotions and relationships. Initially, it wasn't for personal reasons. It was all about ROI, my return on investment for improving my emotional intelligence. I believed that my career would benefit from it. And after spending most of the last five years working on my emotional intelligence, I am happy to report that my career has benefited significantly. As I grew, I learned how my work relationships reflected my world view. Until then, my relationships with my project teams and other stakeholders were weak or nonexistent. That was largely the result of my project management style as a taskmaster. I was all business. Unfortunately, I placed a higher value on tasks, productivity, and outcomes than on relationships. I lacked empathy. I had a way of driving the people on my project teams that was hostile and irresponsible. My coworkers may have called me driven, but they would never have characterized me as a warm and fuzzy relationship person. At best people warmed up to me over time. My big shift came when I began to recognize the value of emotions and relationships in the workplace. I became aware of feelings and learned to trust them as a source of information. I learned to recognize and acknowledge when I felt angry, scared, or happy. I also began to pay attention to what those around me were feeling and to consider that inf

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Meet the Author

ANTHONY MERSINO, PMP, PMI-ACP has more than 26 years of project management experience. He has trained and consulted on Project Leadership and Agile methods for a wide variety of clients.

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