Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815

Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815

3.6 25
by Gordon S. Wood
     
 

ISBN-10: 0195039149

ISBN-13: 9780195039146

Pub. Date: 10/28/2009

Publisher: Oxford University Press

The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, two New York Times bestsellers, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. Now, in the newest volume in the series, one of America's most esteemed historians, Gordon S. Wood, offers a brilliant account of

…  See more details below

Overview

The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, two New York Times bestsellers, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. Now, in the newest volume in the series, one of America's most esteemed historians, Gordon S. Wood, offers a brilliant account of the early American Republic, ranging from 1789 and the beginning of the national government to the end of the War of 1812.
As Wood reveals, the period was marked by tumultuous change in all aspects of American life—in politics, society, economy, and culture. The men who founded the new government had high hopes for the future, but few of their hopes and dreams worked out quite as they expected. They hated political parties but parties nonetheless emerged. Some wanted the United States to become a great fiscal-military state like those of Britain and France; others wanted the country to remain a rural agricultural state very different from the European states. Instead, by 1815 the United States became something neither group anticipated. Many leaders expected American culture to flourish and surpass that of Europe; instead it became popularized and vulgarized. The leaders also hope to see the end of slavery; instead, despite the release of many slaves and the end of slavery in the North, slavery was stronger in 1815 than it had been in 1789. Many wanted to avoid entanglements with Europe, but instead the country became involved in Europe's wars and ended up waging another war with the former mother country. Still, with a new generation emerging by 1815, most Americans were confident and optimistic about the future of their country.
Named a New York Times Notable Book, Empire of Liberty offers a marvelous account of this pivotal era when America took its first unsteady steps as a new and rapidly expanding nation.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195039146
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
10/28/2009
Series:
Oxford History of the United States Series
Pages:
800
Sales rank:
442,430
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.40(h) x 2.60(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: Rip Van Winkle's America
1. Experiment in Republicanism
2. The Monarchical Republic
3. The Federalist Program
4. The Emergence of the Jeffersonian Republican Party
5. The French Revolution in America
6. John Adams and the Few and the Many
7. The Crisis of 1798-1799
8. The Jeffersonian Revolution of 1800
9. Republican Society
10. The Jeffersonian West
11. Law and an Independent Judiciary
12. Chief Justice John Marshall and the Origins of Judicial Review
13. Republican Reforms
14. Between Slavery and Freedom
15. The Rising Glory of America
16. Republican Religion
17. Republican Diplomacy
18. The War of 1812
19. A World within Themselves
Bibliographic Essay

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Empire of Liberty 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be quite revealing of the early history of America on all levels. The early politics and the growth of government institutions was in depth and complete with all of the whys,wherefores abd significant players duly noted. The sociological elements were well researched and provided great insight as to how we got to where we are today. This book provided more information about this era than any other I've read and I have gone through a few. I highly recommend it if you want more than just a high school history of the late 1700's and the early 1800's. It puts our current political divisions in context with our history since not much seems to have changed from then to now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gordon Wood has made a truly important addition to the Oxford History series with his masterful Empire of Liberty. Meticulously researched, comprehensive in its scope, and well written, this is history as it should be -- educational, thought-provoking, and entertaining. For anyone interested in better understanding America's early national period and the lasting foundations that were laid in the years just after the American Revolution, Empire of Liberty is an absolute must-read.
Sybil625 More than 1 year ago
Really flows. Covers everything - not just politics and war, but also social and religious development. And its interesting - not at all like the dreaded "textbook" quality. I got so caught up that I've now started the next volume in the Oxford History of the US, and I'm looking for more since they are son-in-law endorsed. This is the kind of history I wish our kids could read in school instead of ...... (fill in the blank).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thorough insight into American History from Pre-Revolutionary America through the end of the War of 1812. This book describes American idealism from the start of the revolution. It describes attitudes of the founding fathers, often in their own words, and the growth of a diverse society. It presents the ideas of aristocracy which directed the development of the new government. Where this book excels over others is its presentation of American History within a world setting. The importance and influence of the French Revolution on the developing American landscape is discussed in detail, as are American relationships with Great Britain and differing opinions within the new American states which caused continual conflict and threats of succession. Attitudes and behaviors of post-revolutionary Americans are presented in a fairly unbiased manner. Sources are heavily referenced on each page. It also provides a fair assessment of the events leading up to the War of 1812. It sets forth the conflicts in American politics as they affected America's preparation for the war, or lack thereof. It shows a torn nation with republican ideals, in stark contrast to the war that it would inevitably have to fight. It addresses the influence of continuing conflict between Great Britain and France on the landscape of American politics. This book does not portray the War of 1812 as an American victory, as many well do. It provides objective evidence of the events as they occurred and as they were revealed to Americans at home. The reader is left to access the events as presented and draw conclusions based on the facts presented, which are well documented. Empire concludes as the nation emerges from the war and the enlightenment a more conflicted nation but a stronger nation. All in all, I would recommend this book for those seriously interested in a thorough discussion of early America from a world perspective. Innumerable sources are listed for further research. Be prepared for a very long, but very interesting, read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WaldoRWE More than 1 year ago
Gordon S. Wood is the greatest historian alive today!
Bill-V More than 1 year ago
Very articulate and insightful history of a time and place where people can easily become caricatures rather than real people. Balanced and engaging with a theme and sure touch for those little facts that make history alive.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago