Empires of Trust: How Rome Built--and America Is Building--a New World

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Overview

An acclaimed historian offers an optimistic view of the future of the United States in the light of Roman history

Maybe the end of the American ascendancy is not upon us. Maybe the U.S. will continue to dominate the world for centuries. Now award-winning historian Thomas Madden delivers an optimistic view of our nation's future.

Madden shows that the power of the ancient Roman republic and the U.S. was built on trust between allies, not the conquest of enemies. The far-reaching implications of this fact are essential reading for anyone who cares about the challenges we face now and in the years ahead.

Packed with stories from Roman history that offer amazingly obvious and explicitly stated parallels to our recent history, Empires of Trust is a narrative pleasure and a hopeful inspiration.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An entertaining comparison by an astute historian. . .Gems for history buffs as well as those who have never considered that something that happened before 1900 might matter."
-San Francisco Chronicle

"A breakout book."
-Richard Ellis, author of Founding Fathers

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780452295452
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/30/2009
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 801,292
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Thomas F. Madden is a professor of history and chair of the department of history at Saint Louis University. His previous books include The New Concise History of the Crusades, currently the bestselling book on its subject in the world, and Enrico Dandolo and the Rise of Venice, recipient of the Otto Gr√ľndler Prize. He has been featured in the media, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, A&E television, The History Channel, PBS, and National Public Radio.

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Table of Contents

Empires of TrustPreface

1. Empires of Trust . . . and the Other Ones
2. Distrusting Kings
3. Family Values
4. Building an Empire While Trying Not To
5. Becoming a Superpower
6. The Empire and Its Aging Cultural Parents
7. How an Empire of Trust Grows . . . and Grows
8. Pax
9. Fights Around the Dinner Table of Empire
10. The Threat of Terrorism
11. Crying Over the Fall

A Note on Sources
Notes
Bibliography
Acknowledgments
Index

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 3 of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Fails to make his case

    Madden pulls, stretches, massages and ultimatly bends history to fit his premise that the US and Rome can be compared as having built their empires on trust. Rome, he claims, never invaded a nation without just cause, in his view, and then only to keep the peace, not because Romans were imperialists. The tribes of modern day France and England beg to differ. The book has some laugh out loud moments, albeit unintended by the author, as when he claims America 'abandoned' an ally in Vietnam. There is so much ignorance at work in that simple statement that it beggars argument. A loud guffaw is all the response needed.
    The book is interesting in presenting various historical vignettes of Roman history, but since the author is all too clearly bending the facts to suit his argument one wonders just how much credence one can give to the author. Lie to me once ...
    Lastly the book becomes merely tiresome. The basic premise is flogged again and again until one begins flipping through the book hoping for something like a balanced argument, heck even a cogent argument.
    Too silly for my blood. Save your money.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 3 of 2 Customer Reviews

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