BN.com Gift Guide

Empirical Ethics in Psychiatry

Overview


Psychiatry presents a unique array of difficult ethical questions. However, a major challenge is to approach psychiatry in a way that does justice to the real ethical issues. Recently there has been a growing body of research in empirical psychiatric ethics, and an increased interest in how empirical and philosophical methods can be combined. Empirical Ethics in Psychiatry demonstrates how ethics can engage more closely with the reality of psychiatric practice and shows how empirical methodologies from the ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $16.51   
  • New (4) from $74.10   
  • Used (5) from $16.51   
Sending request ...

Overview


Psychiatry presents a unique array of difficult ethical questions. However, a major challenge is to approach psychiatry in a way that does justice to the real ethical issues. Recently there has been a growing body of research in empirical psychiatric ethics, and an increased interest in how empirical and philosophical methods can be combined. Empirical Ethics in Psychiatry demonstrates how ethics can engage more closely with the reality of psychiatric practice and shows how empirical methodologies from the social sciences can help foster this link.

The book is divided into two sections. In the first section there are discussions of the possibility of empirical ethics from a theoretical standpoint and an overview of the history of empirical medical ethics in general. The second, larger section is made up of chapters, discussing a specific research project in empirical psychiatric ethics. The contributors reflect on their choice of method: how and why they combine empirical and philosophical work, and how the two approaches relate to each other. The chapters in the second part thus have two purposes. The first is to present examples of empirical ethics in psychiatry; the second is to reflect on the way in which empirical research can support ethical analysis.

Empirical Ethics in Psychiatry is a unique contribution to the field of bioethics and will be fascinating reading for all those working within bioethics, as well as mental health care professionals.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Erica Rangel, BA (Saint Louis University)
Description: The editors present the possibility of a marriage between empirical methods and ethical theory and apply this model to the practice of psychiatry. Beginning with a theoretical analysis of empirical medical ethics, the book reviews a brief history of empirical ethics and presents two different traditions from which an empirical approach can be defended. Moving from this theoretical examination, various authors offer examples of empirical ethics in psychiatry and reflect on the way in which empirical research may contribute to normative medical ethics.
Purpose: The purpose is to defend and illustrate the application of empirical methods to the work of normative ethics, particularly in the field of psychiatry. The editors offer several illustrations of empirical psychiatric ethics, demonstrating how and why empirical and philosophical work can be combined and how one relates to another.
Audience: The book is written for bioethicists and mental health professionals, although it is likely to challenge those unfamiliar with the project of using social scientific methods and data to enrich normative discussion.
Features: The first part of the book offers a theoretical foundation for empirical ethics and the second provides current examples of how psychiatric research might be applied to psychiatric ethics. However, the contributing authors in this second part also draw on theory to buttress and illuminate their particular methodological choices, presenting an assortment of potential approaches to empirical ethics. These chapters address issues ranging from dementia to advance directives to care of Prader-Willi patients. Chapter seven in particular presents a clear and comprehensive argument for applying empirical methods to the practice of dementia care, relying on the theoretical perspective of American philosopher Margaret Walker and the idea of moral responsibility.
Assessment: With its discussion of empirical ethics in the context of psychiatry, this book addresses a gap in the literature on mental health and bioethics. While the theoretical analysis is brief and perhaps not comprehensive enough for a thorough understanding of the relationship between empirical research and normative assertion, it does give a sufficient introduction to the subject. As the interdisciplinary field of bioethics evolves and advances, it is books like this that will encourage professionals to take a thoughtful look at collaborating with seemingly disparate disciplines.
From the Publisher

"As the interdisciplinary field of bioethics evolves and advances, it is books like this that will encourage professionals to take a thoughtful look at collaborating with seemingly disparate disciplines."--Doody's

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Guy Widdershoven is Professor of Ethics of Health Care and Scientific Director of the School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), Universiteit Maastricht, The Netherlands. His research subject is hermeneutic ethics, especially in the area of chronic care (elderly care, psychiatry and care for people with an intellectual disability). He is one of the editors with Richard Ashcroft, Anneke Lucassen, Michael Parker, and Marian Verkerk of Case Analysis in Clinical Ethics, Cambridge University Press 2005
Tony Hope is Professor of Medical Ethics at the Ethox Centre in the University of Oxford, and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist. He has carried out research in basic neuroscience and Alzheimer's Disease. Since 1990 he has focused on clinical ethics. His books include: the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine (editions 1-4); Manage Your Mind; Medical Ethics and Law: the Core Curriculum; and Medical Ethics: A Very Short Introduction.
John McMillan is Senior Lecturer in Medical Ethics at the Hull York Medical School and the Philosophy Department, University of Hull. He is a deputy director of the Institute of Applied Ethics, University of Hull. His publications include articles and book chapters on the philosophy of psychiatry and Bioethics. He is co-editor of: The Principles of Healthcare Ethics (with Richard Ashcroft, Angus Dawson and Heather Draper) (2007). He is co-author of Consciousness and Intentionality (with Grant Gillett 2001).
Lieke van der Scheer studied philosophy and wrote her Ph.D. dissertation on Unregulated Morality: Dewey's Concept of Experience as a Basis for Health Ethics (in Dutch). Her publications concern the methodology and the theory of empirical ethical research as well as the ethical aspect of care practice. Besides teaching ethics at the Faculty Health, Medicine & Life Sciences of the University of Maastricht (The Netherlands), she also teaches and trains professionals in the care sector. She is a member of various Institutional Review Boards in charge of ethically testing medical research with human subjects.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Introduction Guy Widdershoven Widdershoven, Guy John McMillan McMillan, John Tony Hope Hope, Tony Lieke van der Scheer van der Scheer, Lieke 1

2 The possibility of empirical psychiatric ethics John McMillan McMillan, John Tony Hope Hope, Tony 9

3 Theory and methodology of empirical ethics: a pragmatic hermeneutic perspective Guy Widdershoven Widdershoven, Guy Lieke van der Scheer van der Scheer, Lieke 23

4 The origin and emergence of empirical ethics Pascal Borry Borry, Pascal Paul Schotsmans Schotsmans, Paul Kris Dierickx Dierickx, Kris 37

5 Which empirical research, whose ethics? Articulating ideals in long term mental health care Jeannette Pols Pols, Jeannette 51

6 Models of mental disorder: how philosophy and the social sciences can illuminate psychiatric ethics Anthony Colombo Colombo, Anthony 69

7 Empirical ethics in action in practices of dementia care Minke Goldsteen Goldsteen, Minke 95

8 Family carers, ethics and dementia: an empirical study Clive Baldwin Baldwin, Clive 107

9 The advance directive conjuring trick and the person with dementia Julian C. Hughes Hughes, Julian C. Steven R. Sabat Sabat, Steven R. 123

10 Interference in psychiatric care: a sociological and ethical case history analysis Marian Verkerk Verkerk, Marian Louis Polstra Polstra, Louis Marlieke de Jonge de Jonge, Marlieke 141

11 Providing good care in the context of restrictive measures: the case of prevention of obesity in youngsters with Prader-Willi syndrome R. H. van Hooren van Hooren, R. H. H. W. van den Borne van den Borne, H. W. L. M. G. Curfs Curfs, L. M. G. G. A. M. Widdershoven Widdershoven, G. A. M. 153

12 Ulysses arrangements in psychiatry: fromnormative ethics to empirical research, and back Ine Gremmen Gremmen, Ine 171

13 Treatment refusal in anorexia nervosa: a challenge to current concepts of capacity Jacinta Tan Tan, Jacinta Tony Hope Hope, Tony 187

14 Studying moral reasoning in forensic psychiatric patients Gwen Adshead Adshead, Gwen Christine Brown Brown, Christine Eva Skoe Skoe, Eva Jonathan Glover Glover, Jonathan Sarah Nicholson Nicholson, Sarah 211

15 Patient incompetence in the practice of old age psychiatry: the significance of empirical research for the law Sander Welie Welie, Sander 231

Index 249

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)