Enchanted Glass
  • Alternative view 1 of Enchanted Glass
  • Alternative view 2 of Enchanted Glass

Enchanted Glass

4.1 25
by Diana Wynne Jones
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Aidan Cain has had the worst week of his life. His gran died, he was sent to a foster home, and now malicious beings are stalking him. There is one person Gran told Aidan to go to if he ever got into trouble—a powerful sorcerer who lives at Melstone House.

But when Aidan arrives on the doorstep, he finds that the sorcerer's grandson, Andrew, has inherited

Overview

Aidan Cain has had the worst week of his life. His gran died, he was sent to a foster home, and now malicious beings are stalking him. There is one person Gran told Aidan to go to if he ever got into trouble—a powerful sorcerer who lives at Melstone House.

But when Aidan arrives on the doorstep, he finds that the sorcerer's grandson, Andrew, has inherited the house. The good news is that Aidan can tell immediately that Andrew's brimming with magic, too—and so is everyone else at Melstone. The bad news is that Andrew doesn't remember anything his grandfather taught him. Chaos is swiftly rising, and he has no idea how to control it. A sinister neighbor is stealing power from the land, magic is leaking between realms . . . and it's only a matter of time before the Stalkers find Aidan.

If Aidan and Andrew can harness their own magics, they may be able to help each other. But can they do it before the entire countryside comes apart at the seams?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
One of the foremost living children's fantasy writers, Jones serves up a quirky comedy of magicians dealing with an incursion of troublesome fairies in contemporary England. Andrew Hope, an absentminded academic with magical abilities he barely recognizes, has inherited the property and responsibilities of his wizard grandfather. Melstone House comes complete with two bossy and irate servants, Mr. Stock and Mrs. Stock (no relation), as well as a number of supernatural beings, including an elusive giant. Andrew wants to write a book, but he's soon distracted by 12-year-old Aidan, who is on the run from supernatural enemies; Stashe, a pretty young woman intent on becoming his secretary; and the wealthy, powerful, and mysterious Mr. Brown. The pacing is leisurely, but Jones writes with the utmost respect for readers' intelligence. One very funny gag has Stashe using horse racing results for divination (“The two-oh-five at Kempton: first, Dark Menace; second, Runaway; third, Sanctuary. That seems to outline the situation pretty well, doesn't it?”), just one of several unusual talents that Melstone residents exhibit. Although the book contains a few tense moments, whimsy is the dominant mood and there's little doubt that virtue and romance will triumph. Ages 10-up. (Apr.)
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Irresistible to adventure, humor, and fantasy buffs.”
Booklist
"Jones hits all the bases with her fluid storytelling, trademark sly humor, and exquisitely drawn characters…With this enthralling book, Jones proves that she is still at the top of her game."
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“Irresistible to adventure, humor, and fantasy buffs.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"Irresistible to adventure, humor, and fantasy buffs."
The Horn Book
“An intelligent, refreshing hoot.”
Booklist (starred review)
“Jones hits all the bases with her fluid storytelling, trademark sly humor, and exquisitely drawn characters…With this enthralling book, Jones proves that she is still at the top of her game.”
Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
An orphaned English boy with large spectacles, a mismatched foster family, and an adult wizard/mentor combine to make it seem as if Jones has joined the Cult of Potter. After the death of his "Gran," Aidan Cain feels supernatural forces aligning against him. With only the name Jocelyn Brand and a location of Melstone House to go on, Aidan runs away from his foster parents to find protection from threatening specters. Unfortunately Jocelyn is dead and his grandson, Andrew Hope, is a reluctant "occultist," unsure of his powers and how to protect the "field of care" that he has inherited. Andrew's inheritance is under attack by a neighboring wizard who wishes to expand his own domain. Confusion reigns, with doppelganger characters, a mostly vegetarian giant, and a were-dog who morphs into a boy (accounting for his powers of speech and thought). There are too many adults in the early pages of the book, crowding Aiden. The appearance of Oberon, the Fairy King; his servant, Puck; and his consort, Titania, on a Midsummer Night acknowledges earlier myth, but these characters seem ill fitted to the Roald Dahl-like writing that is Jones's stock-in-trade. The were-dog and a goofy giant named Groil win the award for best supporting characters, and there is a brawl at a county fair that will compel readers to laugh out loud. Overall, there are so many characters that it is difficult to keep them straight, and the book feels messy and imitative, far less than one might expect from a true master of the fantasy genre like Jones. Reviewer: Lois Rubin Gross
School Library Journal
Gr 7–9—In Diana Wynne Jones's labyrinthine tale (Greenwillow, 2010), Andrew Hope has recently been informed of his grandfather's death and subsequent inheritance of his estate in Melstone. As Andrew comes to take possession of the house and property, he discovers some rather unusual characters both within the grounds and outside in what his grandfather called his "field of care." When a boy named Aidan Cain shows up on his doorstep seeking protection, Andrew finds himself embroiled in a magical mystery involving the great fairy king Oberon, regular village folk of Melstone, and various magical creatures. Andrew must discover everything his grandfather wanted him to remember from his childhood about the "field of care." Steven Crossley's deep, rich voice suits the subtle ironies and complications of the text. While he shows great skill in timing, he is less adept at voicing the many characters in Andrew's world. He gives most of the villagers the same type of accent, except for Andrew's love interest, Stashe, who sounds very different. Andrew believes that Stashe's father, Tarquin, is a leprechaun, and while Crossley sometimes gives him a very slight Irish accent, it is mostly inconsistent. These vocal problems make an already complicated plot even more difficult to follow. With Jones's penchant for assuming her readers will infer many important plot points by careful listening, and Crossley's erratic narration, this is best suited to fans of the author's previous work.—Necia Blundy, Marlborough Public Library, MA
Kirkus Reviews
Wynne Jones's inimitable style showcases a multi-generational cast of heroes and a chaotic finale at the village fete. Andrew Hope leaves his job as a university lecturer when his grandfather bequeaths him both a house and a field-of-care. Andrew isn't exactly sure what the field-of-care is, but he knows he needs to protect it. Perhaps it has something to do with the mystical beasties he'd forgotten inhabit his grandfather's land. Or perhaps it has something to do with 12-year-old Aidan, the runaway who's taken refuge with Andrew after being chased from a foster home by creatures he calls Stalkers. Goodness knows Andrew won't get a moment's peace to write his Great Work unless he takes control of the whole shebang. A rousing finale-complete with zeppelin-sized squash, a bouncy castle and several Darth Vaders-brings it all home for a gleeful, magic-packed conclusion. Too bad much of the humor comes from cheap fat jokes, classism and jibes about the cognitively disabled; the mean-spirited moments mar an otherwise playful frolic. (Fantasy. 10-12)
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Irresistible to adventure, humor, and fantasy buffs.”
Neil Gaiman
“She’s the best children’s writer of the last 40 years. I read her latest book, Enchanted Glass, and marveled once again at how good she is. It’s a tale of magic, double-dealing, subversion, and plot, not to mention giant vegetables and dangerous fairies.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061866845
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/06/2010
Pages:
292
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile:
790L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

What People are saying about this

Neil Gaiman
“She’s the best children’s writer of the last 40 years. I read her latest book, Enchanted Glass, and marveled once again at how good she is. It’s a tale of magic, double-dealing, subversion, and plot, not to mention giant vegetables and dangerous fairies.”

Meet the Author

Diana Wynne Jones has been writing outstanding fantasy novels for more than thirty years and is one of the most distinguished writers in this field. With unlimited imagination, she combines dazzling plots, an effervescent sense of humor, and emotional truths in stories that delight readers of all ages. Her books, published to international acclaim, have earned a wide array of honors, including two Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honors, the British Fantasy Society's Karl Edward Wagner Award for having made a significant impact on fantasy, and the World Fantasy Society Lifetime Achievement Award. Acclaimed director and animator Hayao Miyazaki adapted her international bestseller Howl's Moving Castle into a major motion picture, which was nominated for an Academy Award.

Diana Wynne Jones lives in Bristol, England, with her husband, a professor emeritus of English literature at Bristol University. They have three sons.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Enchanted Glass 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
DeborahJRoss More than 1 year ago
Any new book by Jones is a delicious treat, a reason to put down whatever else I'm doing and curl up with a cup of tea. This one, however, came with special poignancy because I received it just after I learned of her death. So I opened the pages with a kind of sadness, not wanting to admit that in many ways, this was farewell. (If there is another book to be published posthumously, I don't know of it.) And found magic. Within a few paragraphs, her clear prose and unaffectedly direct storytelling had drawn me into a world in which magicians bequeath not only fine old houses but fields-of-care as well. Only in this case, the old magician left it "rather too late," meaning without personal instruction as to exactly what a field-of-care is and how one cares for it. A few pages later, Andrew Hope is struggling not only with his magical inheritance but with the two classically-Jones abrasive and recalcitrant retainers, Mr. Stock (who expresses his disapproval in the form of boxes of gigantic and inedible vegetables) and Mrs. Stock (no relation to Mr. Stock, who expresses hers by waging war as to the positioning of the piano in the living room). By the time young Aidan (the boy on the rainbow-hued cover) arrived, I had become part of the household as well. In tone rather than details, Enchanted Glass reminded me very much of the first Jones book I fell in love with, Charmed Life. Even when the characters were at risk, I always felt safe in her hands. Even the most eccentric and unappealing personages were treated with respect and often made invaluable contributions to whatever quest was underway. After all, in worlds where a prince can be enchanted into a turnip-headed broom, where spells are woven into cloaks, centaurs attend fantasy conventions, and fallen stars walk among us as dogs, every moment carries the possibility of wondrous adventure.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Only 7 pages! Do not confuse this with the longer book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Entertaining and You never know what will happen next with one of her stories. As she's been writing stories with wizards before Harry Potter existed, it's ridiculous that one editorial reviewer accused the author of trying to capitalize on the popularity of Rowling's world. Best to say that Rowlings may well have been influenced by this author. Another uneducated editorial reviewer stated that the characters from Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream seemed out of place, but that reviewer is apparently unaware that Shakespeare didn't manufacture Oberon, Titiania, and Puck whole clothe. These characters existed in mythology and writings well before Shakespeare gave them a whirl, and there are hundreds of stories about them in varying environments. I also totally disagree with one reviewer who felt there was mean spirited humor and some poking fun at the cognitively disabled. Instead, we see Shaun with some rare skills that others don't have. I am puzzled as to how any honest reviewer could misinterpret this. This work is a bit different than some of her others in that some of the themes in it seem more for adults, but it is still kid appropriate. All of her works that I've read are enjoyable for kids or adults, and how many authors can you say that about? If you haven't read any ofher works yet and you like fantasy fiction, you are in for a treat, because she's one of the greats. Creativity beyond anything else out there, and it's a great ride. Savor it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love nearly all of DR'S books. This one is just as charming.
AlisonBrooklyn More than 1 year ago
If you like her work, as I do, you will enjoy this one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rocks!! You have to read it!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've yet to read a book that she's written that disappoints me. This is a good book, well worth the read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The best of the books
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Professor Andrew Hope has inherited Melstone House, and it turns out to be more than he bargained for. The housekeeper and gardener don't get along, the paperwork is a mess, and a mysterious orphan boy, Aiden, turns up on his doorstep. Things only get worse when Andrew discovers someone - or something - is trying to take over his property and get to Aiden. Andrew must find a way to keep his land and the boy safe or it could prove disastrous for everyone. I had a difficult time getting into this book. The concept is good, but the constantly shifting points of view made it hard for me to bond with the main characters. Aiden seemed older and far more mature than a young boy should be, and Andrew seemed distant. The minor characters were quirky and funny and helped keep me reading. After I got used to the changing points of view, it made reading easier. The more I read, the more things got exciting, so I'm glad I didn't give up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago