Enchanter's Glass

Enchanter's Glass

5.0 2
by Susan Whitcher
     
 
Things have gotten so bad that Phoebe skips school to escape her problems. Wandering around, Pheobe is drawn to the bridge. When a frightening force sends her over the railing, she emerges from the icy water gripping a chunk of clear glass. Why do things look so strange through this shard? Could it be magic?

Overview

Things have gotten so bad that Phoebe skips school to escape her problems. Wandering around, Pheobe is drawn to the bridge. When a frightening force sends her over the railing, she emerges from the icy water gripping a chunk of clear glass. Why do things look so strange through this shard? Could it be magic?

Editorial Reviews

The ALAN Review - Teri S. Lesesne
Phoebe has much troubling her. Her father seems to have withdrawn from the world following a stroke; her mother is consumed with her music. School is not even a safe haven now that her best friend seems more concerned with make-up than with make-believe. Wishing for some means of escape, Phoebe finds it in a glass shard and the almost-mirror-image world she sees reflected in it. Phoebe's young age notwithstanding, this book is real gem for teachers in middle and high school. Phoebe's adventures in her mirror world are similar to those experienced by the characters in one of her father's favorite works: The Fairie Queen by Spenser. Each chapter opens with a passage from Spenser's work, and the events of that chapter relate in some way to the quotation. This conceit of an allegory within an allegory is perfectly perpetuated throughout this adventure fantasy. Phoebe learns to look through the poetic images to the true reality in her life.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 5-7This well-intentioned effort to meld epic adventure with everyday issues is more likely to annoy than enchant. Whitcher plunges directly into her story without effectively establishing the setting or introducing her characters, making it difficult for readers to follow the plot or care about its outcome. The fault is not a lack of inventiveness, but rather an attempt to accomplish too much. The end result is an odd and unsuccessful amalgam of fantasy quest and realistic fiction. Phoebe is unpopular at school, anxious about her father's health, and concerned about her musical abilities. Her desire for a magical solution to her problems is ostensibly fulfilled when she finds a fragment of glass that changes her perspective and catapults her into a series of fractured fairy-tale adventures. Accompanied by a much-maligned neighbor, Tamas, Phoebe battles her own preconceptions and faces up to an evil enchanter. Success comes only after confrontations with mysterious knights, faithless former friends, and freakish fauns, among others. Although Phoebe and Tamas triumph, the book's ending is oddly ambivalent for both wonder how much of their adventure truly happened. Tamas's bold assertion that their experiences have made them "poets"people who create reality by imaginingseems ironic given the unconvincing narrative that precedes it. Pass on this kaleidoscopic story, but keep an eye open for Whitcher's next work in hopes that it will be a clearer look from her unusual viewpoint.Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Kirkus Reviews
In her first novel, Whitcher (Something For Everyone, 1995, etc.) pens a gripping and unusual story about the intersection of fantasy and reality.

While skipping school because the pressures of ordinary life have become too onerous, middle-schooler Phoebe falls off a bridge. She doesn't drown, but washes up in the shallows clutching a mysterious piece of glass, part of a perfect orb. The world looks different through the glass; Phoebe's fussy neighbor, Mr. Barnes, looks like a wizard. Strange things start happening, too. The class outcast, Tamás, turns up in Phoebe's yard in a vastly transformed state. Phoebe and Tamás enter a magical world from their own imaginings, a world that reflects their dreams, assumptions, and misconceptions back to them. As they learn to look beyond appearances and appreciate each other's real selves, they free themselves from the terrifying spell of their imaginary world. Although some of the transitions between the fantasy and reality are a little confusing, most are handled well. Readers who have longed for a little sorcery in their lives will want to think again after finishing this provocative book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152012458
Publisher:
Harcourt Children's Books
Publication date:
04/15/1996
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.85(w) x 8.53(h) x 0.85(d)
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

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Enchanter's Glass 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been searching all day for this book. I read it in ninth grade I believe. I really, really, really loved it. You should definitely give it a try. It's not a tough read, but the storyline left me smiling.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book caught my eye from the shelf and I grabbed it and started reading it. I couldn't put it down! I read thirty pages before we had to leave the store. I finished it later and I LOVED IT!! If you like fantasy, then you'll absoulutely love this book.