The Enchiridion [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Enchiridion or Manual of Epictetus is a short manual of Stoic ethical advice compiled by Arrian, a 2nd-century disciple of the Greek philosopher Epictetus.

Although the content is similar to the Discourses of Epictetus, it is not a summary of the Discourses but rather a compilation of practical precepts. Eschewing metaphysics, Arrian focused his attention on Epictetus's ...
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The Enchiridion

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Overview

The Enchiridion or Manual of Epictetus is a short manual of Stoic ethical advice compiled by Arrian, a 2nd-century disciple of the Greek philosopher Epictetus.

Although the content is similar to the Discourses of Epictetus, it is not a summary of the Discourses but rather a compilation of practical precepts. Eschewing metaphysics, Arrian focused his attention on Epictetus's work applying philosophy in daily life. The primary theme is that one should accept what happens:

What upsets people is not things themselves but their judgments about the things. For example, "death is nothing dreadful (or else it would have appeared dreadful to Socrates)..."
— Chapter Five

However, "some things are up to us and some are not up to us" and we must act accordingly, taking responsibility for planning and enacting what we can with virtue without becoming upset or disheartened by obstacles and reverses beyond our control.

For many centuries, the Enchiridion maintained its authority both with Christians and Pagans. Two Christian writers – Nilus and an anonymous contemporary – wrote paraphrases of it in the early 5th century and Simplicius of Cilicia wrote a commentary upon it in the 6th. The work was first published in Latin translation by Poliziano in Rome in 1493; Beroaldus published another edition in Bologna in 1496. The original Greek was first published in Venice with the Simplicius's commentary in 1528 and an English translation appeared as early as 1567. The book was a common school text in Scotland during the Scottish Enlightenment. Adam Smith had a 1670 edition in his library, acquired as a schoolboy.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940149392469
  • Publisher: Bronson Tweed Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/11/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 177 KB

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2003

    Escape from mysticism

    Epictetus's teachings helped prepare the western world to achieve the secular foundations necessary for the rule of reason as law. Religious rule would wane significantly, allowing the rise of liberty of thought and wide participation in political life. While retaining the mystery of the 'logos' of the universe, particularly given the relatively recent rise of uncertainty in quantum mechanics, the simple Stoic elements promote the acceptance of reality within political systems and an imperfect nature with a minumum of violent conflict. Epictetus's mitigated skepticism laid groundwork for later thinkers like Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and David Hume, the true fathers of modern constitutional systems based primarily on reason and the rule of law. Enchiridion is a brilliant work to most readers, as all humans are at least in part Stoic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2010

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