Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England

Overview

Enclosure - the conversion of peasants' commonly held lands to privately owned pasture - has long been considered a critical stage in the transition from feudalism to capitalism. This book is the first, however, to treat in detail the literary and cultural implications of enclosure in early modern England. Bringing together the work of both senior and younger scholars who represent a wide range of critical orientations, Enclosure Acts focuses not only on the historical fact of land enclosure but also on the ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $19.90   
  • New (3) from $115.00   
  • Used (7) from $19.90   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 3
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$115.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(135)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$119.50
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(258)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 3
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Enclosure - the conversion of peasants' commonly held lands to privately owned pasture - has long been considered a critical stage in the transition from feudalism to capitalism. This book is the first, however, to treat in detail the literary and cultural implications of enclosure in early modern England. Bringing together the work of both senior and younger scholars who represent a wide range of critical orientations, Enclosure Acts focuses not only on the historical fact of land enclosure but also on the symbolic containment of sexuality in Elizabethan and Jacobean literary works. The first type of enclosure frequently has been treated by materialists and new historicists; feminists and theorists concerned with issues of gender have tended to concentrate on the second. The fourteen essays collected here explore the relationships between these two ways of perceiving enclosure in the context of cultural studies. Individual chapters examine the creation of territorial and social boundaries as well as the consequences of enclosure acts. Taking into account the complex implications of changes in boundaries - whether of land, religion, sexuality, or subjectivity - the essays investigate aspects of literary culture from the Elizabethan popular theater to the enclosed world of the seventeenth-century country-house poem. Among the topics discussed are the significance of enclosure in plays such as Marlowe's Edward II and Shakespeare's Richard II and Henry VI, and in the poetry of Marvell and Spenser.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801427459
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • Publication date: 5/26/1994
  • Series: 9/28/2005
  • Pages: 352
  • Lexile: 1650L (what's this?)

Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 Landlord Not King: Agrarian Change and Interarticulation 17
2 "The Nursery of Beggary": Enclosure, Vagrancy, and Sedition in the Tudor-Stuart Period 34
3 Jack Cade in the Garden: Class Consciousness and Class Conflict in 2 Henry VI 48
4 Foreign Country: The Place of Women and Sexuality in Shakespeare's Historical World 68
5 Shakespeare and the English Witch-Hunts: Enclosing the Maternal Body 96
6 Observations on English Bodies: Licensing Maternity in Shakespeare's Late Plays 121
7 The Poetry of Conduct: Accommodation and Transgression in The Faerie Queene, Book 6 151
8 Submitting to History: Marlowe's Edward II 170
9 The 1599 Bishops' Ban, Elizabethan Pornography, and the Sexualization of the Jacobean Stage 185
10 This Is Not a Pipe: Water Supply, Incontinent Sources, and the Leaky Body Politic 203
11 The Enclosure of Virginity: The Poetics of Sexual Abstinence in the English Revolution 229
12 The Garden Enclosed / The Woman Enclosed: Marvell and the Cavalier Poets 251
13 The Garden State: Marvell's Poetics of Enclosure 270
14 Dictionary English and the Female Tongue 290
Notes on Contributors 327
Index 331
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)