Encore [Collectors Edition] [Explicit Lyrics]

( 5 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
With Encore, Eminem continues his reign as rap music's most controversial figure. On his fourth album, the Shady One continues to display the Jekyll and Hyde tendencies we've come to expect, detailing his love for his daughter Hailie ("Mockingbird") and disdain for his estranged wife Kim ("Puke") with equal aplomb. At times, his sonic experiments, such as the elastic cadences and nursery rhyme harmonies, make the album sound more alt-rock than rap, and post-pubescent listeners might be offended by the bodily function sound effects that pepper several songs, including the aforementioned "Puke." Fortunately, however, even when Em veers off track, the good Dr. Dre, who steers half the beats, keeps the music rooted in ...
See more details below
CD (Special Edition / Bonus CD / Special Packaging)
$25.58
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$29.99 List Price
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (1) from $97.64   
  • New (1) from $97.64   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
With Encore, Eminem continues his reign as rap music's most controversial figure. On his fourth album, the Shady One continues to display the Jekyll and Hyde tendencies we've come to expect, detailing his love for his daughter Hailie ("Mockingbird") and disdain for his estranged wife Kim ("Puke") with equal aplomb. At times, his sonic experiments, such as the elastic cadences and nursery rhyme harmonies, make the album sound more alt-rock than rap, and post-pubescent listeners might be offended by the bodily function sound effects that pepper several songs, including the aforementioned "Puke." Fortunately, however, even when Em veers off track, the good Dr. Dre, who steers half the beats, keeps the music rooted in hardcore hip-hop, as on the plodding and melancholy chords of the politically volatile "Mosh." In the tradition of the Dido-sampled "Stan," "Like Toy Soldiers" samples Martika's "Toy Soldiers," adding snappy, military styled drums to the original's vocals as Eminem mulls the folly of his well publicized beefs with The Source Magazine and 50 Cent nemesis Ja Rule. These songs show that Marshall Mathers continues to tackle timely topics with reflective maturity, and that sort of soul-baring will make Encore a long running performance. Alvin Aqua Blanco
Barnes & Noble
With Encore, Eminem continues his reign as rap music's most controversial figure. On his fourth album, the Shady One continues to display the Jekyll and Hyde tendencies we've come to expect, detailing his love for his daughter Hailie ("Mockingbird") and disdain for his estranged wife Kim ("Puke") with equal aplomb. At times, his sonic experiments, such as the elastic cadences and nursery rhyme harmonies, make the album sound more alt-rock than rap, and post-pubescent listeners might be offended by the bodily function sound effects that pepper several songs, including the aforementioned "Puke." Fortunately, however, even when Em veers off track, the good Dr. Dre, who steers half the beats, keeps the music rooted in hardcore hip-hop, as on the plodding and melancholy chords of the politically volatile "Mosh." In the tradition of the Dido-sampled "Stan," "Like Toy Soldiers" samples Martika's "Toy Soldiers," adding snappy, military styled drums to the original's vocals as Eminem mulls the folly of his well publicized beefs with The Source Magazine and 50 Cent nemesis Ja Rule. These songs show that Marshall Mathers continues to tackle timely topics with reflective maturity, and that sort of soul-baring will make Encore a long running performance. Alvin Aqua Blanco
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Eminem took a hiatus after the release of his first motion picture, 8 Mile, in late 2002, but it never seemed like he went away. Part of that is the nature of celebrity culture, where every star cycles through gossip columns regardless of whether they have a project in the stores or theaters, and part of it is that Marshall Mathers kept busy, producing records by his protégés D12, Obie Trice, and 50 Cent -- all hit albums -- with the latter turning into the biggest new hip-hop star of 2003. All this activity tended to obscure the fact that Eminem hadn't released a full-length album of new material since The Eminem Show in early summer 2002, and that two and a half years separated that album and its highly anticipated sequel, Encore. As the title suggests, Encore is a companion piece to The Eminem Show the way that The Marshall Mathers LP mirrored The Slim Shady LP, offering a different spin on familiar subjects. Where his first two records dealt primarily with personas and characters, his second two records deal with what those personas have wrought, which tends to be intrinsically less interesting than the characters themselves, since it's dissecting the aftermath instead of causing the drama. On The Eminem Show that kind of self-analysis was perfectly acceptable, since Eminem was on the top of his game as both a lyricist and rapper; his insights were vibrant and his music was urgent. Musically, Show didn't innovate, but it didn't need to: Eminem and his mentor, Dr. Dre, had achieved cruising altitude, and even if they weren't offering much that was new, the music sounded fresh and alive. Here, the music is spartan, built on simple unadorned beats and keyboard loops. Some songs use this sound to its advantage and a few others break free -- "Yellow Brick Road" is a tense, cinematic production, yet it fits the subject matter. Eminem has decided to chronicle what's happened to him over the past two years and refute every charge that's made it into the papers. This is quite a bit different than his earlier albums, when he embellished and exaggerated his life, when his relationship with his estranged wife Kim turned into an outlaw ballad, when his frenetic insults, cheap shots, and celeb baiting had a surreal, hilarious impact. Here, Eminem is plain-spoken and literal, intent on refuting every critic from Benzino at The Source to Triumph the Insult Comic Dog, who gets an entire song "Ass Like That" devoted to him. While the album is a little long, it's worth a listen to hear the moments that work really well, whether it's full songs or flights of phrase.

Eminem took a hiatus after the release of his first motion picture, 8 Mile, in late 2002, but it never seemed like he went away. Part of that is the nature of celebrity culture, where every star cycles through gossip columns regardless of whether they have a project in the stores or theaters, and part of it is that Marshall Mathers kept busy, producing records by his protégés D12, Obie Trice, and 50 Cent -- all hit albums -- with the latter turning into the biggest new hip-hop star of 2003. All this activity tended to obscure the fact that Eminem hadn't released a full-length album of new material since The Eminem Show in early summer 2002, and that two and a half years separated that album and its highly anticipated sequel, Encore. As the title suggests, Encore is a companion piece to The Eminem Show the way that The Marshall Mathers LP mirrored The Slim Shady LP, offering a different spin on familiar subjects. Where his first two records dealt primarily with personas and characters, his second two records deal with what those personas have wrought, which tends to be intrinsically less interesting than the characters themselves, since it's dissecting the aftermath instead of causing the drama. On The Eminem Show that kind of self-analysis was perfectly acceptable, since Eminem was on the top of his game as both a lyricist and rapper; his insights were vibrant and his music was urgent. Musically, Show didn't innovate, but it didn't need to: Eminem and his mentor, Dr. Dre, had achieved cruising altitude, and even if they weren't offering much that was new, the music sounded fresh and alive. Here, the music is spartan, built on simple unadorned beats and keyboard loops. Some songs use this sound to its advantage and a few others break free -- "Yellow Brick Road" is a tense, cinematic production, yet it fits the subject matter. Eminem has decided to chronicle what's happened to him over the past two years and refute every charge that's made it into the papers. This is quite a bit different than his earlier albums, when he embellished and exaggerated his life, when his relationship with his estranged wife Kim turned into an outlaw ballad, when his frenetic insults, cheap shots, and celeb baiting had a surreal, hilarious impact. Here, Eminem is plain-spoken and literal, intent on refuting every critic from Benzino at The Source to Triumph the Insult Comic Dog, who gets an entire song "Ass Like That" devoted to him. While the album is a little long, it's worth a listen to hear the moments that work really well, whether it's full songs or flights of phrase.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/12/2004
  • Label: Aftermath
  • UPC: 602498646700
  • Catalog Number: 000376102
  • Sales rank: 50,815

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Curtains Up (0:46)
  2. 2 Evil Deeds (4:19)
  3. 3 Never Enough - 50 Cent (2:39)
  4. 4 Yellow Brick Road (5:46)
  5. 5 Like Toy Soldiers (4:56)
  6. 6 Mosh (5:17)
  7. 7 Puke (4:07)
  8. 8 My 1st Single (5:02)
  9. 9 Paul (0:32)
  10. 10 Rain Man (5:13)
  11. 11 Big Weenie (4:26)
  12. 12 Em Calls Paul (1:11)
  13. 13 Just Lose It (4:08)
  14. 14 Ass Like That (4:25)
  15. 15 Spend Some Time - Stat Quo (5:10)
  16. 16 Mockingbird (4:10)
  17. 17 Crazy in Love (4:02)
  18. 18 One Shot 2 Shot - D12 (4:26)
  19. 19 Final Thought (0:30)
  20. 20 Encore - 50 Cent (5:48)
Disc 2
  1. 1 We as Americans (4:39)
  2. 2 Love You More (4:47)
  3. 3 Ricky Ticky Toc (2:49)
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Eminem Primary Artist, Rap
Dr. Dre Rap
Steven King Bass, Guitar, Mandolin, Keyboards
Luis Resto Keyboards
Mark Batson Bass, Keyboards
Nate Dogg Rap
Mike Elizondo Guitar, Keyboards, Sitar
50 Cent Rap
D12 Rap
Obie Trice Rap
Lindsay Collins screams
Stat Quo Rap, Track Performer
Technical Credits
Dr. Dre Producer, Executive Producer, Audio Production
Steven King Composer, Producer, Engineer
Luis Resto Composer, Producer, Audio Production
Mark Batson Composer, Producer, Audio Production
Melvin Bradford Composer
Steve Baughman Engineer
Mike Elizondo Composer, Producer, Audio Production
Deborah Mannis-Gardner Sample Clearance
Andre Young Composer
A. Wilson Composer
A. Young Composer
Eminem Producer, Audio Production
Che Pope Composer
N. Hale Composer
Marshall Mathers Composer
Tony Campana Engineer
Curtis Jackson Composer
Obie Trice Composer
Mauricio "Veto" Irragorri Engineer
R. Arthur Johnson Composer
Sarah Catlett Studio Coordinator
Mike Chav Engineer
Che Vicious Programming
Brian "Big Bass" Gardner Mastering
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Finally an appropriate CD

    Eminem has managed to pull it off, a CD as good as his others with remotely appropriate lyrics!! This CD was awesome.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Em's Best CD

    this is Eminem's best CD so far, with songs that are remniscant of his alter ego Slim Shady(Rain Man and Just Lost It) to thought provoking songs that show his maturity over the years in the rap game(Like Toy Soldiers, Mosh, Yellow Brick Road) and even songs on his personal life(Puke, Mockingbird) this is truly a near flawless CD. Best Tracks: Rain Man, Like Toy Soldiers, Mockingbird, Mosh and Encore

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Good - But NOT Best Ever

    For all you neo-hip hoppers who think EMINEM is the greatest thing since sliced bread, I suggest you check out the new Talib Kweli, as well as ANYTHING by Rakim. Emenem wishes he had skills like these. That said, when Eminem finds a happy medium between taking himself too seriously, and being a clown, he displays formidable skill. Dre is still the best producer in the rap game, and proves it here, even on the embarassingly stupid "*ss Like That".

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    best thing ever

    this is yet another great hit by eminem. I liked this cd because it has a lot of good songs.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews