Encounters with Nature: Essays by Paul Shepard

Encounters with Nature: Essays by Paul Shepard

by Florence R. Shepard, Paul Shepard
     
 
<p>While most scholars work within the safe, sturdy confines of conventional academics, Paul Shepard moved beyond convention, out under the open sky where he was free to turn and peer in every direction. Blending, sifting, and culling massive mounds of scientific, historical, and deductive data-drawn from biology, ecology, ethology, anthropology, archaeology,

Overview

<p>While most scholars work within the safe, sturdy confines of conventional academics, Paul Shepard moved beyond convention, out under the open sky where he was free to turn and peer in every direction. Blending, sifting, and culling massive mounds of scientific, historical, and deductive data-drawn from biology, ecology, ethology, anthropology, archaeology, psychology, sociology, philosophy, and even art-he searched for shards of truth, then fit those pieces together to give logical and meaningful shape to our world. His interdisciplinary approach brought together diverse fields of research, embodying in a sense Edward O. Wilson's recently proposed idea of "consilience"-the unity of knowledge needed in the fragmented world of academic specialization.<p>Throughout the vast body of Shepard's literary legacy, certain themes appear repeatedly: the aesthetics and perception of landscape and nature; animals and their pervasive influence on our humanity; ontogeny, the development of the individual in complicity with nature and with culture; and "place" as the grounding of our being. Encounters with Nature brings together twenty-one essays written over a span of four decades that explore those themes and chronicle an interlocking progression of knowledge and insight that certifies Paul Shepard as one of the most brilliant thinkers of our time.<p>The essays were selected and edited by Florence Shepard, who also provides a preface and substantial notes that introduce each section; her contributions offer illuminating biographical information that places the essays within the context of Shepard's life. In addition, the book features an introductory essay by writer David Petersen that discusses the meaning and importance of Shepard's guiding ideas.<p>Encounters with Nature gives the reader a deeper understanding of Paul Shepard's thought, bringing his intellectual development into closer focus and providing a valuable overview of his life and vision. The book will bring a greater appreciation of the prescience and timelessness of Shepard's writings to his many followers and friends, and can also serve to introduce new readers to the remarkable breadth and depth of his work and insight.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Ecologist Shepard (Traces of an Omnivore, etc.), who died in 1996, maintains in this erudite collection of essays that hunting was instrumental in transforming our arboreal, cringing, tropical forest-dwelling prehuman ancestors into full-fledged humans. Pursuing a line of thought developed by Loren Eiseley, Ortega y Gasset and others, Shepard argues that the challenges faced by thousands of generations as hunters--when we lived by killing horses, deer, cattle, bears, mammoths and other large mammals--decisively shaped our human capacity for aggression, sharing, love and ritual. Along with this one-sided theory comes a defense of modern hunting for sport on the grounds that "early death" plays an essential adaptive role in most animal populations. Readers who disagree with Shepard on this point will still find the remainder of these philosophical essays stimulating, despite his tendency to veer into turgid or fustian prose. By examining the role of animals in dreams, folktales, children's play and myths, he shows how animals serve as talismans of human consciousness and identity. At its best, the book is quirky and iconoclastic. "Five Green Thoughts," for instance, traces the layout of suburbia back to Virgil's concept of the pastoral and critiques the "enclave mentality" that leads us to preserve nature by partitioning it into gardens, parks and wilderness areas. Elsewhere, Shepard knocks Albert Schweitzer's "reverence for life" ethic for its simplistic separation of "good" versus "bad" animals. Other pieces deal with sociobiology's roots in ecology, the sacred bear in Paleolithic cosmology, the "boobism" of tourists prey to busywork and synthetic landscapes, and the importance of place in our lives. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781559635295
Publisher:
Island Press
Publication date:
09/28/1999
Edition description:
1
Pages:
252
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

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