Encyclopedia of New Media: An Essential Reference to Communication and Technology

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $2.77
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 98%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $2.77   
  • New (2) from $123.76   
  • Used (7) from $2.77   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$123.76
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(2390)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0761923829 This item is brand new. Please allow 4 - 14 business days for Standard shipping, within the US. Thank you for supporting our small, family-owned business!

Ships from: ACWORTH, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$151.77
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(196)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Edited by Steve Jones, one of the leading scholars and founders of this emerging field, and with contributions from an international group of scholars as well as science and technology writers and editors, the Encyclopedia of New Media widens the boundaries of today’s information society through interdisciplinary, historical, and international coverage. With such topics as broadband, content filtering, cyberculture, cyberethics, digital divide, freenet, MP3, privacy, telemedicine, viruses, and wireless networks, the Encyclopedia will be an indispensable resource for anyone interested or working in this field.

Unlike many encyclopedias that provide short, fragmented entries, the Encyclopedia of New Media examines each subject in depth in a single, coherent article. Many articles span several pages and are presented in a large, double-column format for easy reading. Each article also includes the following:

  • A bibliography
  • Suggestions for further reading
  • Links to related topics in the Encyclopedia
  • Selected works, where applicable

Entries include:

Pioneers, such as Marc Andreesen, Marshall McLuhan, and Steve Jobs
Terms, from "Access" to "Netiquette" to "Web-cam"
Technologies, including Bluetooth, MP3, and Linux
Businesses, such as Amazon.com
Key labs, research centers, and foundations
Associations
Laws, and much more
The Encyclopedia of New Media includes a comprehensive index as well as a reader’s guide that facilitates browsing and easy access to information.

Recommended Libraries

Public, academic, government, special, and private/corporate

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Lawrence Looks at Books
"From Space Invaders to digital television, the 275 entries explore the developments of computer and Web applications and related media. Most take a historical perspective to innovation, but many explain such concepts as access, firewalls, information design, linking, markup languages and usability. . . . This informed and up-to-date guide to emerging technologies is highly recommended to academic and public libraries. "— John R.M. Lawrence, Reference Librarian
Choice Magazine
"Scholars and students finally have a reference work documenting the foundations of the digital revolution. Authoritative and well organized, edited by communication professor and prominent new media scholar Jones, the encyclopedia's scope follows his wise tenet that any definition of the subject matter 'derives from an understanding of history, technology, and society in combination.' In this spirit, the signed articles by more than three dozen contributors, mostly academics, provide clear, critical overviews of the people, products, events, social implications, trends, texts, and concepts related to contemporary innovations in communication and information technology. Selected bibliographies, suggested readings, and cross-references to related subjects appear throughout, and thorough indexing bridges any perceived omissions among individual entries. Were it not the only reference book to cover this emergent field, Jones's encyclopedia would still likely be the best. "
From the Publisher
“There is something for everyone within the just over 250 entries….All entries conclude with useful bibliographies, which, not surprisingly, feature a large number of Web citations….Recommended for all public and academic libraries.”
Reference & User Services Quarterly
“The articles are interesting, entertaining, well written, and reasonably long. . . . Highly recommended as a worthwhile and valuable addition to both science and technology and social science reference collections.”
Lawrence Looks at Books - John R.M. Lawrence
"From Space Invaders to digital television, the 275 entries explore the developments of computer and Web applications and related media. Most take a historical perspective to innovation, but many explain such concepts as access, firewalls, information design, linking, markup languages and usability. . . . This informed and up-to-date guide to emerging technologies is highly recommended to academic and public libraries."
CHOICE
"Scholars and students finally have a reference work documenting the foundations of the digital revolution. Authoritative and well organized, edited by communication professor and prominent new media scholar Jones, the encyclopedia's scope follows his wise tenet that any definition of the subject matter 'derives from an understanding of history, technology, and society in combination.' In this spirit, the signed articles by more than three dozen contributors, mostly academics, provide clear, critical overviews of the people, products, events, social implications, trends, texts, and concepts related to contemporary innovations in communication and information technology. Selected bibliographies, suggested readings, and cross-references to related subjects appear throughout, and thorough indexing bridges any perceived omissions among individual entries. Were it not the only reference book to cover this emergent field, Jones's encyclopedia would still likely be the best."
VOYA
This hefty single volume begins with an alphabetic list of entries followed by a reader's guide that classifies articles into twelve general thematic categories-art, music, and performance; business and commerce; cyberculture; hacking; legal topics; networks and networking; open-source software; organizations and labs; people; social issues; technology; and writing. A significant purpose of the book is to examine concepts and trends that comprise the context within which new media are invented and used. In addition, the encyclopedia provides a chronicle of the past and present state of new media development by explaining the origins of new ideas and technologies. Entries range in length from one to several pages; most are not illustrated. This valuable niche publication is the only encyclopedia this reviewer has seen that collects a tremendous volume of media information in a single source. Whether exploring the genesis of Amazon.com, Java programming, the advantages and disadvantages of markup languages, or the concept of virtual community, the entries are concise, straightforward, and easily accessible to students from middle through high school age. The "people" category includes not only such widely recognized names as entrepreneur Steven Jobs, industrialist Bill Gates, and media theorist Marshall McLuhan, but also lesser-known figures such as performance artist Laurie Anderson, musician and multimedia artist Brian Eno, and information design pioneer Edward Tufte. The somewhat esoteric nature of the content makes it suitable for purchase by medium- and large-size libraries where demand exists. Index. Photos. Biblio. Further Reading. 2003, Sage Publications, 532p. PLB
— CindyLombardo
Library Journal
This accessible and easy-to-navigate one-volume encyclopedia covers the ever-changing world of "new media," which includes communication technologies from World War II to the present. Editor Jones (chair, communications, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago) has selected a wide range of topics and themes that highlight the dramatic changes in communication and media, especially in the last 30 years, presenting important developments, organizations, and people. The 250-plus signed entries have been classified into 12 general thematic categories (art, music, and performance; business and commerce; cyberculture; hacking; legal topics; networks and networking; open-source software; organizations and labs; people; social issues; technology; and writing) and cover a variety of subjects, ranging from Brian Eno's contributions regarding electronic music, content filtering, and object-oriented programming to emoticons, computer viruses, and the increasingly popular MP3s. Beyond basic descriptions of the terms, the contributors put each subject in its social and historical context, thus providing a broader understanding of the impact it has had on communication and the media. Entries are usually one to two pages long and include a bibliography, suggestions for further reading, and a list of related topics. Biographical entries also include a list of the subject's selected works and occasionally a black-and-white photo. Also useful is a detailed bibliography, a comprehensive index, and a list of all 40 contributors and their affiliations. For academic and larger public libraries.-Michele McGraw, Hennepin Cty. Lib., Edina, MN Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up-From "Cookies" to "Copyleft," "Blogs" to "Wireless Networks," "Brian Eno" to "Steven P. Jobs," this comprehensive map of modern media's technological and sociological terrain makes an essential guide for library users bewildered by the seismic changes that the past few decades have brought. Sandwiched between opening alphabetical and topical tables of contents, and a reasonably thick index, approximately 250 signed articles are arranged in a single alphabet; each one is a serious, specific topical or biographical study, enhanced by closing lists of scholarly sources and a generous number of cross-references. Along with articles about ARPANET, Vannevar Bush's prescient 1945 essay "As We May Think," and other nods to the antediluvian past, hot-button subjects of current interest such as the Communications Decency Act or the MP3 controversy receive detailed treatment, and entries on "Gender and New Media," "Telecommuting," and "Race and Ethnicity and New Media," among others, broaden the focus. Despite its stingy selection of murky black-and-white photographs, this volume merits serious consideration, even for midsize collections, as a major and well-organized source of new or hard-to-find information on a mind-bending array of topics.-John Peters, New York Public Library Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761923824
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Publication date: 12/10/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 544
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Steve Jones is professor and head of the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is author/editor of numerous books, including Doing Internet Research, The Encyclopedia of New Media, CyberSociety, and Virtual Culture. He is co-founder and president of the Association of Internet Researchers and co-editor of New Media & Society, an international journal of research on new media, technology, and culture. He also edits New Media Cultures, a series of books on culture and technology for Sage Publications, and Digital Formations, a series of books on new media for Peter Lang Publishers.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Comprehensive Index
List of Entries
A Reader's Guide
Introduction
Encyclopedia of New Media
Bibliography
Contributors
Name Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)