Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations: Over 4000 Color and Planting Schemes
  • Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations: Over 4000 Color and Planting Schemes
  • Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations: Over 4000 Color and Planting Schemes
  • Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations: Over 4000 Color and Planting Schemes
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Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations: Over 4000 Color and Planting Schemes

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by Tony Lord
     
 

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This is the reference book your library can't do without. -- Garden Design A comprehensive, easy-to-use guide on how to mix and match for successful plant harmony.
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Overview

This is the reference book your library can't do without. -- Garden Design A comprehensive, easy-to-use guide on how to mix and match for successful plant harmony.

Editorial Reviews

The Hartford Courant
[Review of previous edition] To call an encyclopedia an "encyclopedia" is to suggest that it is a stodgy reference book. Not so! Many of the plant pairings are innovative and exciting, food for thought for many winter evenings to come.
National Garden Clubs
[Review of previous edition] For both novice and experienced gardeners... a bounty of gorgeous photographs.
Globe and Mail
[Review of previous edition] A book of rare quality, this tome ought to be in every serious gardener's library.
The writing is rich and descriptive...informative and lively, but the photos are indispensable... Gardening enthusiasts...will adore it.
Christmas 2012 Gift Book List
National Garden Clubs gardenclub.org
[Review of previous edition] Tony Lord offers aesthetic and practical advice on combining plants in a garden scheme in this comprehensive guide for both novice and experienced gardeners... Accompanied by a bounty of gorgeous photographs.... Contains invaluable information... The color illustrations throughout the book are particularly enlightening....
National Garden Clubs www.gardenclub.org
[Review of previous edition] Tony Lord offers aesthetic and practical advice on combining plants in a garden scheme in this comprehensive guide for both novice and experienced gardeners... Accompanied by a bounty of gorgeous photographs.... Contains invaluable information... The color illustrations throughout the book are particularly enlightening....
American Reference Books Annual, Volume 35 - Paul Mogren
[Review of previous edition] A visual delight... informative to read, and offers first-rate suggestions.
Booklist - Carol Haggas
[Review of previous edition] [Few guides rival this]for the practicality of its structure or for the quality of its information.
Canadian Gardening - Christina Selby
[Review of previous edition] Form, whether in flower or foliage, is paramount to creating perfect plant pairings.
Choice - S.C. Awe
[Review of previous edition] Concise text and abundant, gorgeous photos ... essential for libraries and aspiring gardeners everywhere.
Columbus Dispatch - Cindy Decker
[Review of previous edition] Gardeners need to know which plants look good together, which is where [Encyclopedia of] Planting Combinations comes in.
E-Streams Vol. 6, No. 4 - William Johnson
[Review of previous edition] Unique among gardening books available today with its practical recognition of what makes gardenscapes beautifully tranquil.
Escarpment Views - Gloria Hildebrandt
Definitely a dream book, its stunning photographs from gardens in the U.S. and Europe are intended to inspire.
Garden Compass - John Bagnasco
Fully revised and expanded .... Show it off at your next garden club meeting.
Garden Design - Megan Padilla
Top 10 New Garden Books. This is the reference book your library can't do without.
Gardens Illustrated - Paul Williams
[Review of previous edition] Very good reference book whether or not you are trying to find successful combinations... exceptional value.
Kitchener-Waterloo Record - David Hobson
[Review of previous edition] Stunning book ... shows how a simple garden can be turned into a work of art.
Muskoka Today (Gravenhurst ON) - Lois Cooper
[Review of previous edition] Spectacular color photos and thousands of planting combinations show gardeners with all levels of gardening expertise the end results for informed choices of plant combinations.
Neil Sperry's Gardens Magazine - Susanna Reid
[Review of previous edition] A brilliant gardening resource. Make no mistake. This is no ordinary encyclopedia.
New Living ( Stony Brook
[Review of previous edition] Your eyes will feast upon some of the most stunning photographs ever compiled in a gardening book.... You can create your own Secret Garden with help from this amazing new book.... An indispensable information source for all levels of gardening expertise.
Seattle Times - Valerie Easton
[Review of previous edition] Unusual... both inspirational and practical, for the photos are beautiful and the writing clear and detailed.
The American Gardener - Mark Miller
[Review of previous edition] Overall the book offers beginning gardeners a wealth of creative ideas for planning their gardens, and it contains enough innovative combinations to be of value to more experienced gardeners and landscape designers.
The Gazette (Montreal) - Steve Whysall
[Review of previous edition] [Andrew Lawson's] exceptional images alone make this plant encyclopedia a pleasure to own.
The Globe and Mail (Metro Ed) - Carolyn Ireland
[Review of previous edition] The writing is rich and descriptive.. informative and lively, but the photos are indispensable for illustrating such pairings as blue carpet juniper intertwined with the fiery autumn foliage of Virginia creeper... Gardening enthusiasts will adore it.
The Toronto Star (Metro) - Peggy Mackenzie
[Review of previous edition] A reader would be hard-pressed to stump this catalogue of plantings.... Helpful for all gardeners, regardless of ability.
Vancouver Province - Kerry Moore
[Review of previous edition] What a wonderful resource... truly encyclopedic.
NY) New Living ( Stony Brook
[Review of previous edition] Your eyes will feast upon some of the most stunning photographs ever compiled in a gardening book.... You can create your own Secret Garden with help from this amazing new book.... An indispensable information source for all levels of gardening expertise.
Texas Gardener's Seeds
While the advice is valuable, the pictures alone are worth the price of admission, making this winning book a valuable gardener's companion.
Hartford Courant
To call an encyclopedia an encyclopedia is to suggest that it is a stodgy reference book. Not so!
Landscape Architect and Specifier News
This revised second edition is a full color reference intended for the landscape architect's or gardener's library.
New Living
[Review of previous edition] An indispensable information source.
Toronto Star
[Review of previous edition] This encyclopedia is helpful for all gardeners, regardless of ability.
American Reference Books Annual 2014 - Janet Mongan
A visual delight... What makes this book quite different from numerous plant books with descriptions of plants and their culture is that the author comments on what other plants go well with the plant to achieve pleasing combinations, based on color, texture, and growing conditions.... It is beautiful to look at, informative to read, and offers first-rate suggestions for making one's garden truly a work of art.
David Hobson
Wow! This is a stunning book. Packed with a menu of suggestions, it shows how a simple garden can be turned into a work of art.
Kitchener-Waterloo Record
Valerie Easton
[An] unusual reference that is both inspirational and practical, for the photos are beautiful and the writing clear and detailed.
Seattle Times
S.C. Awe
Concise text and abundant, gorgeous photos ... essential for libraries and aspiring gardeners everywhere.
Choice
Christina Selby
The most important lesson I took from this book is that form, whether in flower or foliage, is paramount to creating perfect plant pairings.
Canadian Gardening
Library Journal
Lord (Designing with Roses) and Lawson (Great English Gardens) have produced a stunning book that is destined to become an essential reference on combining plants. A practical introduction to that art covers analyzing the site; choosing plants with form, texture, and color in mind; planting borders; and providing aftercare. More than 1000 individual species are organized into chapters by type: shrubs and small trees, climbers, roses, perennials, bulbs, and annuals. Each entry includes the plant's botanical name, common name, genus, species, and variety. Symbols are used to indicate light level, soil water content, soil conditions, hardiness zones, pH, flowering season, height and spread, and a list of planting partners. Beautiful color photographs show each plant in subtle harmony-or in bold contrast-with one or more plants. Each entry is cross-referenced to other entries illustrating other combinations with this plant. The hardiness zone maps cover North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. One caveat: although most plant combinations are adaptable to diverse U.S. climates, the range of plants is best suited to conditions similar to those of the United Kingdom. Still, books on combining plants are scarce, so this authoritative text is appropriate for horticultural libraries. The clear advice and vivid photographs render it equally suitable for public libraries in the appropriate regions. [Garden Book Club selection.]-Nancy Myers, Univ. of South Dakota Lib., Vermillion Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
The Globe and Mail (Metro Ed)
The writing is rich and descriptive.. informative and lively, [and] the photos are indispensable... Gardening enthusiasts will adore it.
— Carolyn Ireland
Escarpment Views
Definitely a dream book, its stunning photographs from gardens in the U.S. and Europe are intended to inspire.
— Gloria Hildebrandt
Garden Compass
Fully revised and expanded .... Show it off at your next "garden club" meeting.
— John Bagnasco
Muskoka Today (Gravenhurst ON)
Spectacular color photos and thousands of planting combinations.
— Lois Cooper
Garden Design
Top 10 New Garden Books. This is the reference book your library can't do without.
— Megan Padilla
Columbus Dispatch
Gardeners need to know which plants look good together, which is where [Encyclopedia of] Planting Combinations comes in.
— Cindy Decker
Seattle Times
[Review of previous edition] Unusual... both inspirational and practical, for the photos are beautiful and the writing clear and detailed.
— Valerie Easton
The American Gardener
[Review of previous edition] A wealth of creative ideas... innovative combinations.
— Mark Miller
Neil Sperry's Gardens Magazine
[Review of previous edition] A brilliant gardening resource. Make no mistake. This is no ordinary encyclopedia.
— Susanna Reid
Canadian Gardening
[Review of previous edition] Form, whether in flower or foliage, is paramount to creating perfect plant pairings.
— Christina Selby
Booklist
[Review of previous edition] [Few guides rival this]for the practicality of its structure or for the quality of its information.
— Carol Haggas
Vancouver Sun
Tony Lord's Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations is stunning.
— Steve Whysall
Vancouver Province
[Review of previous edition] What a wonderful resource... truly encyclopedic.
— Kerry Moore
Gardens Illustrated
[Review of previous edition] Very good reference book whether or not you are trying to find successful combinations... exceptional value.
— Paul Williams
Choice
[Review of previous edition] Concise text and abundant, gorgeous photos ... essential for libraries and aspiring gardeners everywhere.
— S.C. Awe
Kitchener-Waterloo Record
[Review of previous edition] Stunning book ... shows how a simple garden can be turned into a work of art.
— David Hobson
The Gazette (Montreal)
A great resource for gardeners seeking to raise the quality of their gardens by concentrating on more creative planting ideas.
— Steve Whysall
The Toronto Star (Metro)
More than 1,000 plants in more than 4,000 combinations. A reader would be hard-pressed to stump this catalogue of plants....
— Peggy Mackenzie
The Vancouver Sun
A great resource for gardeners seeking to raise the quality of their gardens by concentrating on more creative planting ideas.
— Steve Whysall

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781554079971
Publisher:
Firefly Books, Limited
Publication date:
01/26/2012
Pages:
464
Sales rank:
884,225
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 11.00(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Excerpted from the Section "Shrubs and Small Trees" are the introduction and sample entries. Each entry is accompanied by a full color photograph of the plant.

In most garden plantings a proportion of shrubs and a small selection of trees are essential to provide height, bulk, structure and, with the inclusion of some evergreens, year-round interest.

There is a wide choice of shrubs, varying from low ground-covering potentillas to towering abutilons, from fine-textured genistas to giant-leaved rhododendrons, from those shrubs with fleeting flowers such as amelanchiers to those that are non-stop performers such as hydrangeas, their dried flower heads persisting through the winter months. Some shrubs are deciduous, perhaps with colorful autumn foliage, others are evergreen.

The boundary between shrubs and small trees is a blurred one. Pittosporums, lilacs, philadelphus, and many others start their life as shrubs and if pruned to a single stem, can eventually make picturesque small trees. Trees display all the attributes of shrubs, but higher above ground level, often on trunks that have their own merits of elegant outline or attractive bark.

Making a selection

Trees and shrubs contribute to both the structure and the decoration of the garden, and it is important to bear these two aspects in mind when selecting and arranging them. In most situations, it is best to avoid thinking in terms of the "shrub border" and to plan instead to use trees and shrubs to enhance the whole garden. Selecting only those species that will grow well in the particular soil and situation will ensure that they thrive with minimum effort andwill also create a strong sense of unity in the garden.

Small trees and the taller shrubs can be used to create height and as focal points. Birches with their pale trunks, lilacs with their spring blossom, or the very elegant paperbark maple, in groups or as single specimens, will draw the eye, frame views, and create a canopy to capture views of the sky. In large enough groups -- even a well-placed trio in a small garden -- the atmosphere of a wood or wild garden can be created: viewed from the rest of the garden, the trees form attractive masses, while under their canopy is a scene of vertical trunks and cool green shade with a rich woodland ground flora.

Once the high points have been decided on, the major shrubs can be distributed to form bold accents at a lower level: witch hazels for their spidery winter flowers, magnolias and rhododendrons for their blooms in spring and early summer, along with bright green-yellow or gold-leaved specimens such as euphorbias and Philadelphus coronarius 'Aureus'. Hydrangeas are ideal for autumn interest. Mahonias and many of the conifers are good for texture and greenery all year round, playing an especially important role in maintaining structure and interest through the winter. The shrubs at this level should not be crowded together to grow into shapeless masses but, instead, are best placed where they will display themselves most effectively: those with autumn color where the sun will shine through them; those with bright winter stems where the low winter light falls; fragrant plants near enough to the edge of the planting to be smelled and in sheltered situations so the scent will be concentrated.

When the star cast of trees and specimen shrubs has been assembled, attention can be turned to the chorus, the less dramatic but no less important plants that will enclose and shelter the garden, guide people through it, subdivide larger plots into smaller and more comfortable spaces, and conceal any undesirable views. For these purposes there is a great army of well-behaved but less exciting (and usually much less expensive) shrubs.

Finally, having established the structure of the garden with shrubs growing from waist height (where they will obstruct physical movement) to eye level and above (as visual barriers), attention can be turned to the ground plane. Here low plants can be woven together: lavenders, cistus, and rosemaries do well on dry soils, while the heathers, leucothoes, smaller rhododendrons, and many others are ideal for moist, acid situations. Knee-high shrubs will cover the ground to reduce the necessity for weeding; they will also soften the transition between lawns and paving and fences, walls, and trees, and will create their own tapestry of foliage, flowers, and form.

Designing shrub borders

Where a shrub border is what is required, it should not be thought of as a form of herbaceous border -- a series of more-or-less equally sized blocks or drifts with a different plant in each. While occasionally helpful in a herbaceous border, in a shrub border this approach can be disastrous because the basic building unit, the shrub, is much larger and usually less colorful than the individual herbaceous plant. Therefore, each shrub group will be too large to relate effectively to its neighbors. What is needed in shrub planting is much greater variation in grouping, from individual specimen plants to substantial masses of ten, twenty, or more lower ground covers. The outlines of the larger groups should be irregular, like pieces in a jigsaw, so that they are linked together more firmly. The spacing between specimens in a group should also be varied, unless formality is intended. Lessons can be learned from natural groupings of trees, rocks, or even animals in a field, and it is worth spending time playing with circles on paper to achieve the right effect.

Finishing touches and after-care

Woody plants usually start off much too small for their situation but then grow inexorably, often eventually becoming much too large. Thinness in the early stages can be compensated for by interplanting the permanent selection with short-lived and quick-growing shrubs (brooms and lavateras, for example), herbaceous perennials, or annuals. Care must be taken to avoid smothering the long-term plants with their temporary companions, but this type of planting is much better than crowding together the permanent plants for instant effect, and paying the penalties of overcrowding forever after.

In fact, useful though trees and shrubs are in a garden, it is neither necessary nor desirable to grow them to the exclusion of other plants. Spring bulbs provide an intensity of color and freshness of new life unrivaled by any shrub, and they will clothe the ground beneath deciduous shrubs and trees with an early and beautiful carpet. Lilies will push through the lower shrubs to flower in late summer. Herbaceous plants extend the flowering season and break the monotony of an over-reliance on shrubs. Stout clumps of peonies, arching sheaves of daylilies, and tall branching heads of Japanese anemones will all create a greater sense of seasonal change and welcome lightness among the woody permanence of the shrubs. For an even lighter effect, proportions can be shifted from a mainly shrubby border, relieved by occasional marginal groups of other plants, to a thoroughly "mixed" border in which shrubs, herbaceous plants, annuals, bulbs, and climbers are assembled in a balanced community.

Once the permanent shrubs and trees have reached the desired size, it may be necessary to restrict their growth to prevent the garden deteriorating into a tangle of the most aggressive species. If time is available, rule-book pruning can be adopted. This is an art in itself and very satisfying. On a larger scale it is often simpler to prune plants periodically, cutting one in five -- or perhaps one group in five -- to ground level and allowing them to regrow.

 

Abelia x grandiflora 'Francis Mason'

Most often grown as a foliage plant, this vigorous semi-evergreen shrub has bright gold-edged leaves, which overwhelm its pale blush-pink flowers and reddish bronze stems, calyces, and young shoots. It contrasts well with blue flowers and glaucous foliage, but it is most effective with warm and hot colors, gold-variegated foliage, red- or orange-leaved shrubs like photinias, and yellow-green foliage and flowers. Its slightly amorphous form benefits from association with plants of contrasting growth habit, such as bamboos, grasses, Japanese maples, and pyracanthas pruned to produce long, arching shoots. 'Sunrise' is similar, less than 1m (3 1/4ft) high and wide, and makes an excellent ground cover -- as do 'Prostrata' and cream-variegated Confetti ('Conti'), both 50cm (20in) by 1.5m (5ft). A. x grandiflora is more vigorous than the cultivars with unmarked leaves, and is useful for its late flowers.

PLANT COMBINATIONS:
Aralia elata 'Aureovariegata', Berberis temolaica, B. thunbergii'Red Chief', Delphinium Belladonna Group, Fargesia murielae 'Bimbo', Pyracantha 'Golden Dome'

Height: 1.5m (5ft)
Spread: 2m (6 1/2ft)
Flowering Season: Mid- to late summer
Light Level: full, day-long sun
Soil Water Content: Always moist, never waterlogged or dry
Soil: light well drained to medium with adequate drainage
Zone 6
pH 6-8

Abies koreana 'Silberlocke'

A slow-growing fir with glaucous silver-backed needles and deep purplish blue upright cones, 'Silberlocke' produces its best colors in full sun and relatively poor soil. It deserves prominence as a single specimen in a heather garden, island bed, or large rock garden, surrounded by shorter carpeting plants such as heaths and heathers, shorter-growing ericaceous plants including dwarf rhododendrons, prostrate vacciniums and cassiopes, and smaller grasses like rescues. This ground cover may be planted with smaller spring bulbs, especially blue-flowered kinds such as scillas and muscaris, and soft yellow or white narcissi. 'Silberlocke' is not suitable for borders, where neighboring plants can suppress growth on one or both sides of the fir, spoiling its attractive symmetry.

PLANT COMBINATIONS:
Calluna vulgaris 'Gold Haze', Cassiope 'Edinburgh', Narcissus 'April Tears', N. 'Ice Wings', Rhododendron 'Sarled', Scilla siberica, Vaccinium vitis-idaea 'Koralle'

Height: 1.8m (6ft)
Spread: 1.2m (4ft)
Flowering Season: Spring (flowers insignificant or not main feature)
Soil Water Content: Always moist, never waterlogged or dry
Soil: light well drained to medium with adequate drainage
Zone: 5
pH: 5-6.5

Abutilon vitifolium var. album

This large, upright deciduous shrub, quick-growing but short-lived, has grey-white woolly stems, vine-shaped leaves, and large, translucent white flowers with a central golden disk. It benefits from a sunny site, particularly in areas with cool summers, and looks effective against a dark evergreen background, or in a shrub border if isolated to emphasize its vase shape. It mixes well with tall herbaceous plants, such as white foxgloves or delphiniums and silvery Scotch thistles, while its flowering season suits combinations with larger Shrub roses and early-flowering buddlejas. Although blending successfully with almost any color, it is outstanding with pale flowers and silver or glaucous foliage, and may be used to support clematis or honeysuckles flowering in late spring or early summer. 'Tennant's White' is a particularly choice selection.

PLANTING COMBINATIONS:
Buddleja alternifolia 'Argentea', Clematis 'Bees Jubilee', Delphinium Galahad Group, Eremurus robustus, Onopordum nervosum, Rosa 'Fantin-Latour'

Height: 5m (16ft)
Spread: 2.5m (8ft)
Flowering Season: Late spring to mid-summer
Soil Water Content: Always moist, never waterlogged or dry
Soil: light well drained to medium with adequate drainage
Zone: 8
pH: 5.5-7

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