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Encyclopedia of the Antebellum South
     

Encyclopedia of the Antebellum South

by James M. Volo, Dorothy Denneen Volo, Dorothy Denneen Volo
 

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This comprehensive ready-reference encyclopedia of the history, people, events, places, movements, and issues of the Antebellum South is ideal for student use. Nearly 300 entries, selected for curriculum relevance with the assistance of historians and secondary school library media specialists, are organized alphabetically and thoroughly cross-referenced. The

Overview

This comprehensive ready-reference encyclopedia of the history, people, events, places, movements, and issues of the Antebellum South is ideal for student use. Nearly 300 entries, selected for curriculum relevance with the assistance of historians and secondary school library media specialists, are organized alphabetically and thoroughly cross-referenced. The entries cover all aspects of political, economic, military, social, and cultural history of what was an exceedingly complex period fraught with contradictions. Slave life and conditions, plantation society, political and reform movements, revolts, industrialization, profiles with statistics of each Southern state, and biographical profiles of 90 key personalities of the period contribute to the comprehensive coverage of the encyclopedia. Each entry concludes with a bibliography of further reading suitable for students. A chronology of events and more than 45 illustrations from the period complement the text.

The work is dedicated to the history of the South and the southern lifestyle as it was in the half-century before the Civil War and looks at certain events a decade or so outside of this period to provide continuity. The authors have carefully selected entries that reveal the southern perceptions of society, culture, and politics. The South's peculiar institution of slavery and the extension of slavery into the territories are examined not only as uniquely individual elements of antebellum southern society but as themes which permeated the attitudes, beliefs, and actions of the antebellum southerner. The many entries on slave life and conditions provide the reader with a great deal of pertinent information about the institution of slavery and the lives of those enslaved. Easy to use and comprehensive, this is an ideal reference work for schools and public libraries.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
The antebellum South (1810-1860) was a time of contradictions, juxtaposing conditions of chivalry and brutality, hospitality and coldness, and self-sufficiency and dependence. The nearly three hundred alphabetically arranged entries, ranging from one paragraph to several pages, cover a variety of topics—people, places, events, beliefs, customs, politics, arts, and economics. Entries about each of the states are taken from an 1853 gazetteer. Less commonly found topics include banking institutions, hotels, fashion, bacon and pork, and courtship and marriage. As stated in the introduction, the authors stress several concepts throughout the book, among them nullification, romanticism, states' rights, and manifest destiny. They also examine slavery, discussing how it permeated southern society. There are cross-references within the entries, necessitating some flipping back and forth between pages but leading to further understanding of the topic. See and see-also references are provided as well. Each entry ends with suggested reading titles that are likely to be found in large public and college libraries. There are a few problems with facts and writing style. The one map of the antebellum South has taken the Eastern Shore from Maryland. Additionally, the information about John C. Calhoun is confusing, particularly about when he was Andrew Jackson' s vice president. There is a sentence about Jackson's dispute with Calhoun over tariffs in 1833, but Calhoun had resigned at the end of 1832 and was a senator in 1833. Some of the writing might be off-putting; Cassius M. Clay, a well-known southern emancipationist, is described as "thereafter being adjudged a lunatic." The book certainly is useful,however, for homework assignments, and students will gain a better understanding of the period. 2000, Greenwood, 390p, Index, Illus., Photos, Maps, Charts, Further Reading, Chronology, PLB. Ages 12 to 18. Reviewer: Susan H. Levine VOYA, February 2001 (Vol. 23, No.6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313308864
Publisher:
Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Pages:
408
Product dimensions:
6.37(w) x 9.48(h) x 1.32(d)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

JAMES M. VOLO is a teacher, historian, and living history enthusiast. He has been an active historic reenactor for more than two decades, participating in a wide range of living history events, including television and screen performance. With Dorothy Denneen Volo, he is co-author of Daily Life in Civil War America (Greenwood, 1998).

DOROTHY DENNEEN VOLO is a teacher and historian. She has been an active living history reenactor for twenty years and has been involved in numerous community historical education projects. With James M. Volo, she is co-author of Daily Life in Civil War America (Greenwood, 1998).

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