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The End of Apartheid in South Africa
     

The End of Apartheid in South Africa

by Liz Sonneborn
 

In 1948, the parliament of South Africa passed a series of laws designed to systematically strip the nation's black majority of all political, economic, and human rights. The result was apartheid, a legislative program that made the South African government one of the most oppressive regimes of the twentieth century. The End of Apartheid m South Africa describes

Overview

In 1948, the parliament of South Africa passed a series of laws designed to systematically strip the nation's black majority of all political, economic, and human rights. The result was apartheid, a legislative program that made the South African government one of the most oppressive regimes of the twentieth century. The End of Apartheid m South Africa describes the impact apartheid had on South African society and the emergence of the powerful protest movement that sought to combat it. Anti-apartheid leaders such as Stephen Biko and Nelson Mandela inspired a worldwide campaign against the South African government. This internal and external snuggle brought a peaceful end to apartheid in 1994, and in the process, transformed South Africa from an international pariah into a modern democracy.

Milestones in Modern world History introduces students to seminal historical events that helped shape the modern world. Bolstered by biographical sketches, illustrations, photographs, excerpts from primary source documents, and first-person narratives, this curriculum-based series is idea! for students writing reports.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Despite its title, this book focuses predominantly on the history of apartheid from the beginning of the colonization of South Africa in 1652 through Jacob Zuma's presidency in 2009. The narrative is coherent and interesting, as it keeps a number of different threads going and explains in some detail the complex history of conflict in the country. Sonneborn describes how South Africa came to be engulfed in an uprising in the 1980s, that its political leaders were released in 1990, and how a future constitution was negotiated, leading up to the first free elections in 1994. She pinpoints the issues tackled by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, economic development, and AIDS as challenges faced by the post-apartheid government. There are a number of inaccuracies, many of them fairly minor. However, one is more serious, and it could lead to a misunderstanding of the nature of resistance against apartheid. Sonneborn claims that black trade unions were illegal during apartheid: in fact, they were legal, but "not recognized." This meant that employers did not have to negotiate with them. The fact that these organizations were able to operate openly helped to make them an important force in the anti-apartheid struggle. The black-and-white photographs are adequate in number and clear. Text boxes around topics of special interest are helpful, but the time line and chronology are not detailed enough to provide useful information. Buy only where there is demand for this topic.—Sue Giffard, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, New York City

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604134094
Publisher:
Facts on File, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Series:
Milestones in Modern World History Series
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

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