End of History and the Last Man

End of History and the Last Man

4.0 2
by Francis Fukuyama
     
 

ISBN-10: 0380720027

ISBN-13: 9780380720026

Pub. Date: 02/01/1993

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

Fukuyama's profound inquiry leads the reader to the question of whether humanity will eventually reach a stable state in which it is at last completely satisfied, or whether there is something about the condition of humans that will always lead them to smash this ultimate equilibrium and plunge the world back into chaos.  See more details below

Overview

Fukuyama's profound inquiry leads the reader to the question of whether humanity will eventually reach a stable state in which it is at last completely satisfied, or whether there is something about the condition of humans that will always lead them to smash this ultimate equilibrium and plunge the world back into chaos.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780380720026
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/01/1993
Series:
Harper Perennial
Pages:
418
Product dimensions:
5.24(w) x 8.14(h) x 1.08(d)

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End of History and the Last Man 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If it were possible to reconcile Hegel with Nietzsche, Fukuyama has found a way - this is the primier book by Fukuyama and will give the reader a full look at his ideas. Detractors may call the book and even the thesis grandiose, unnecessary, or an indulgence with no clear grounded common sense. This latter is true, in that only those willing to learn about history can see how fukuyama posits to deal with it, in this regard in the course of his arguments, Fukuyama supplies the reader with more than adequate information, though it should not be new to the reader. The sidenote reason FOR historians has always been 'to understand our natures, to understand where our natures would lead us, not to repeat the mistakes of the past' - indeed in this most uncertain of times, when could it be more necessary to examine the past, to question democracy? Some of the most clear examples of how such a process is justified are given here, such as the Islamic Revolution in this century. Let no one believe Fukuyama is anything short of the foremost leader in this new field of thought, and it will assuredly open up an entirely new school of historical science.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Fukuyama presents an interesting and thought provoking thesis with his interpretations of Hegel and Kojeve. He fails, however, to consider the realities of the political and social situations that are faced by the countries he investigates. Is the world really headed to a universal liberal democracy, a welfare state with a market economy? Fukuyama's arguments are a convincing extension of Hegelianism but do not address fundamental questions of the real regime.