The End of Work: Theological Critiques of Capitilism / Edition 1

The End of Work: Theological Critiques of Capitilism / Edition 1

by John Hughes
     
 

The End of Work explores the "problem of labor" from a theological perspective. Addressing both theologians concerned with how Christianity might engage in social criticism, as well as secular philosophers and political theorists, this book explores the connection between Marxist and Radical Christian Romantic traditions.

Surveying twentieth-century

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Overview

The End of Work explores the "problem of labor" from a theological perspective. Addressing both theologians concerned with how Christianity might engage in social criticism, as well as secular philosophers and political theorists, this book explores the connection between Marxist and Radical Christian Romantic traditions.

Surveying twentieth-century theologies of work and contrasting various approaches to the topic, this book looks at the relationship between divine and human work, explores debates about labour under capitalism, and, through a thorough reading of Weber's Protestant Work Ethic, argues that the triumph of the "spirit of utility" is crucial to understanding modern notions of work. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century Romantic and Catholic writers are then drawn upon to resist this with an alternative theo-aesthetic vision of the redemption of work as ultimately liturgical.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405158923
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
10/16/2007
Series:
Illuminations: Theory & Religion Series
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.76(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface.

Introduction: Work in the Christian Tradition.

1. Twentieth-century Theologies of Work: Karl Barth, Marie-Dominique Chenu, John Paul II and Miroslav Volf.

2. Utility as the Spirit of Capitalism: Max Weber’s Diagnosis of Modern Work.

3. Labour, Excess and Utility in Karl Marx: The Problem of Materialism and the Aesthetic.

4. John Ruskin and William Morris: An Alternative Tradition: Labor and the Theo-aesthetic in English Romantic Critiques of Capitalism.

5. The Frankfurt School: The Critique of Instrumental Reason and Hints of Return to the Theo-aesthetic within Marxism.

6. The end of Work: Rest, Beauty and Liturgy: The Catholic Metaphysical Critique of the Culture of Work and its Incorporation into the English Romantic Tradition: Josef Pieper, Jacques Maritain, Eric Gill and David Jones.

7. Concluding Remarks: Labor, Utility and Theology.

Bibliography.

Index

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