Ender's Game (Movie Tie-In) (Ender Quintet #1)

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Overview

Once again, the Earth is under attack. Alien "buggers" are poised for a final assault. The survival of the human species depends on a military genius who can defeat the buggers. But who? Ender Wiggin. Brilliant. Ruthless. Cunning. A tactical and strategic master. And a child. Recruited for military training by the world government, Ender's childhood ends the moment he enters his new home: Battleschool. Among the elite recruits Ender proves himself to be a genius among geniuses. In simulated war games he excels. ...
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Overview

Once again, the Earth is under attack. Alien "buggers" are poised for a final assault. The survival of the human species depends on a military genius who can defeat the buggers. But who? Ender Wiggin. Brilliant. Ruthless. Cunning. A tactical and strategic master. And a child. Recruited for military training by the world government, Ender's childhood ends the moment he enters his new home: Battleschool. Among the elite recruits Ender proves himself to be a genius among geniuses. In simulated war games he excels. But is the pressure and loneliness taking its toll on Ender? Simulations are one thing. How will Ender perform in real combat conditions? After all, Battleschool is just a game. Right?

Winner of the 2008 Margaret A. Edwards Award

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Orson Scott Card's 1985 novel Ender's Game was a miracle oak that grew from the tiny acorn of 1977 short story. This science fiction classic about a young man's experiences at Battle School won both the Hugo and the Nebula awards and then became the takeoff vehicle for a quintet that continues to gain readers. Speaking of takeoffs, a much-discussed, widely anticipated adaptation will premiere in the United States on November 1st. It stars Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, and Ben Kingsley. Now in a mass-market movie tie-in edition and a NOOK Book.

Children's Literature
This twenty-five-year-old science fiction classic has been repackaged for younger readers. Unlike many hard-core science fiction titles, this book is particularly appropriate for a younger audience, for its protagonist, Ender Wiggin, is just six years old at the novel's beginning and still a pre-teen at its end. Ender's parents have received a special dispensation to have a third child in spite of strict population control laws. His brilliant older siblings, Peter and Valentine, have each showed great promise, but each falls just short of having "the right stuff." The International Fleet (I.F.) believes that Ender may be the commander they need to lead great armies against invasion by alien "buggers." When Ender does exhibit the desired combination of compassion and cruelty, the I.F. takes him to the distant Battle School, where brilliant children are trained in military strategy and tactics. The centerpiece of their education is a simulated battle game at which Ender quickly excels, eventually becoming the youngest commander in history. Life at Battle School, especially these battle games, is richly described. Ender is portrayed as just a pawn in the larger game being played by the I.F., and readers will alternately sympathize with his exploitation and cheer when he is able to make friends in spite of the tremendous forces working to isolate and dehumanize him. The political and philosophical material at the novel's end may get too heavy for some readers, but for the most part, this novel will deservedly reach a new generation through this new edition.
—Norah Piehl
From the Publisher
“Read Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game before the big-screen adaptation, starring Harrison Ford and Hugo’s Asa Butterfield, hits theaters Nov. 1.” —Entertainment Weekly, 13 Ways to Get Ready for '13

“Superb! This is Card at the height of his very considerable powers—a major SF novel by any reasonable standard.”—Booklist

“An affecting novel full of surprises. Card never makes the mistake of patronizing or sentimentalizing his hero.”—The New York Times Book Review

“A pleasure to listen to. Refreshing, highly entertaining and fast-paced. Orson Scott Card is a phenomenal writer.” – USA TODAY

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765337320
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 10/1/2013
  • Series: Ender Quintet Series , #1
  • Edition description: Media Tie-In
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 296,865
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Orson Scott Card

ORSON SCOTT CARD is the author of the international bestsellers Shadow of the Giant, Shadow Puppets, Shadow of the Hegemon, and Ender's Shadow, and of the beloved classic of science fiction, Ender's Game, as well as the acclaimed fantasy series The Tales of Alvin Maker. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Biography

Any discussion of Orson Scott Card's work must necessarily begin with religion. A devout Mormon, Card believes in imparting moral lessons through his fiction, a stance that sometimes creates controversy on both sides of the fence. Some Mormons have objected to the violence in his books as being antithetical to the Mormon message, while his conservative political activism has gotten him into hot water with liberal readers.

Whether you agree with his personal views or not, Card's fiction can be enjoyed on many different levels. And with the amount of work he's produced, there is something to fit the tastes of readers of all ages and stripes. Averaging two novels a year since 1979, Card has also managed to find the time to write hundreds of audio plays and short stories, several stage plays, a television series concept, and a screenplay of his classic novel Ender's Game. In addition to his science fiction and fantasy novels, he has also written contemporary fiction, religious, and nonfiction works.

Card's novel that has arguably had the biggest impact is 1985's Hugo and Nebula award-winner Ender's Game. Ender's Game introduced readers to Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, a young genius faced with the task of saving the Earth. Ender's Game is that rare work of fiction that strikes a chord with adults and young adult readers alike. The sequel, Speaker for the Dead, also won the Hugo and Nebula awards, making Card the only author in history to win both prestigious science-fiction awards two years in a row.

In 2000, Card returned to Ender's world with a "parallel" novel called Ender's Shadow. Ender's Shadow retells the events of Ender's Game from the perspective of Julian "Bean" Delphinki, Ender's second-in-command. As Sam to Ender's Frodo, Bean is doomed to be remembered as an also-ran next to the legendary protagonist of the earlier novel. In many ways, Bean is a more complex and intriguing character than the preternaturally brilliant Ender, and his alternate take on the events of Ender's Game provide an intriguing counterpoint to fans of the original series.

In addition to moral issues, a strong sense of family pervades Card's work. Card is a devoted family man and father to five (!) children. In the age of dysfunctional family literature, Card bristles at the suggestion that a positive home life is uninteresting. "How do you keep ‘good parents' from being boring?" he once said. "Well, in truth, the real problem is, how do you keep bad parents from being boring? I've seen the same bad parents in so many books and movies that I'm tired of them."

Critical appreciation for Card's work often points to the intriguing plotlines and deft characterizations that are on display in Card's most accomplished novels. Card developed the ability to write believable characters and page-turning plots as a college theater student. To this day, when he writes, Card always thinks of the audience first. "It's the best training in the world for a writer, to have a live audience," he says. "I'm constantly shaping the story so the audience will know why they should care about what's going on."

Card brought Bean back in 2005 for the fourth and final novel in the Shadow series: Shadow of the Giant. The novel presented some difficulty for the writer. Characters who were relatively unimportant when the series began had moved to the forefront, and as a result, Card knew that the ending he had originally envisioned would not be enough to satisfy the series' fans.

Although the Ender and Shadow series deal with politics, Card likes to keep his personal political opinions out of his fiction. He tries to present the governments of futuristic Earth as realistically as possible without drawing direct analogies to our current political climate. This distance that Card maintains between the real world and his fictional worlds helps give his novels a lasting and universal appeal.

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    1. Hometown:
      Greensboro, North Carolina
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 24, 1951
    2. Place of Birth:
      Richland, Washington
    1. Education:
      B.A. in theater, Brigham Young University, 1975; M.A. in English, University of Utah, 1981
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

ENDERS GAME (Chapter 1)

THIRD

"I've watched through his eyes, I've listened through his ears, and I tell you he's the one. Or at least as close as we're going to get."

"That's what you said about the brother."

"The brother tested out impossible. For other reasons. Nothing to do with his ability."

"Same with the sister. And there are doubts about him. He's too malleable. Too willing to submerge himself in someone else's will."

"Not if the other person is his enemy."

"So what do we do? Surround him with enemies all the time?"

"If we have to."

"I thought you said you liked this kid."

"If the buggers get him, they'll make me look like his favorite uncle."

"All right. We're saving the world, after all. Take him."

The monitor lady smiled very nicely and tousled his hair and said, "Andrew, I suppose by now you're just absolutely sick of having that horrid monitor. Well, I have good news for you. That monitor is going to come out today. We're going to take it right out, and it won't hurt a bit."

Ender nodded. It was a lie, of course, that it wouldn't hurt a bit. But since adults always said it when it was going to hurt, he could count on that statement as an accurate prediction of the future. Sometimes lies were more dependable than the truth.

"So if you'll just come over here, Andrew, just sit right up here on the examining table. The doctor will be in to see you in a moment."

The monitor gone. Ender tried to imagine the little device missing from the back of his neck. I'll roll over on my back in bed and it won't be pressing there. I won't feel it tingling and taking up the heat when I shower.

And Peter won't hate me anymore. I'll come home and show him that the monitor's gone, and he'll see that I didn't make it, either. That I'll just be a normal kid now, like him. That won't be so bad then. He'll forgive me that I had my monitor a whole year longer than he had his. We'll be—

Not friends, probably. No, Peter was too dangerous. Peter got so angry. Brothers, though. Not enemies, not friends, but brothers—able to live in the same house. He won't hate me, he'll just leave me alone. And when he wants to play buggers and astronauts, maybe I won't have to play, maybe I can just go read a book.

But Ender knew, even as he thought it, that Peter wouldn't leave him alone. There was something in Peter's eyes, when he was in his mad mood, and whenever Ender saw that look, that glint, he knew that the one thing Peter would not do was leave him alone. I'm practicing piano, Ender. Come turn the pages for me. Oh, is the monitor boy too busy to help his brother? Is he too smart? Got to go kill some buggers, astronaut? No, no, I don't want your help. I can do it on my own, you little bastard, you little Third.

"This won't take long, Andrew," said the doctor.

Ender nodded.

"It's designed to be removed. Without infection, without damage. But there'll be some tickling, and some people say they have a feeling of something missing. You'll keep looking around for something, something you were looking for, but you can't find it, and you can't remember what it was. So I'll tell you. It's the monitor you're looking for, and it isn't there. In a few days that feeling will pass."

The doctor was twisting something at the back of Ender's head. Suddenly a pain stabbed through him like a needle from his neck to his groin. Ender felt his back spasm, and his body arched violently backward; his head struck the bed. He could feel his legs thrashing, and his hands were clenching each other, wringing each other so tightly that they arched.

"Deedee!" shouted the doctor. "I need you!" The nurse ran in, gasped. "Got to relax these muscles. Get it to me, now! What are you waiting for!"

Something changed hands; Ender could not see. He lurched to one side and fell off the examining table. "Catch him!" cried the nurse.

"Just hold him steady—"

"You hold him, doctor, he's too strong for me—"

"Not the whole thing! You'll stop his heart—"

Ender felt a needle enter his back just above the neck of his shirt. It burned, but wherever in him the fire spread, his muscles gradually unclenched. Now he could cry for the fear and pain of it.

"Are you all right, Andrew?" the nurse asked.

Andrew could not remember how to speak. They lifted him onto the table. They checked his pulse, did other things; he did not understand it all.

The doctor was trembling; his voice shook as he spoke. "They leave these things in the kids for three years, what do they expect? We could have switched him off, do you realize that? We could have unplugged his brain for all time."

"When does the drug wear off?" asked the nurse.

"Keep him here for at least an hour. Watch him. If he doesn't start talking in fifteen minutes, call me. Could have unplugged him forever. I don't have the brains of a bugger."

He got back to Miss Pumphrey's class only fifteen minutes before the closing bell. He was still a little unsteady on his feet.

"Are you all right, Andrew?" asked Miss Pumphrey.

He nodded.

"Were you ill?"

He shook his head.

"You don't look well."

"I'm OK."

"You'd better sit down, Andrew."

He started toward his seat, but stopped. Now what was I looking for? I can't think what I was looking for.

"Your seat is over there," said Miss Pumphrey.

He sat down, but it was something else he needed, something he had lost. I'll find it later.

"Your monitor," whispered the girl behind him.

Andrew shrugged.

"His monitor," she whispered to the others.

Andrew reached up and felt his neck. There was a bandaid. It was gone. He was just like everybody else now.

"Washed out, Andy?" asked a boy who sat across the aisle and behind him. Couldn't think of his name. Peter. No, that was someone else.

"Quiet, Mr. Stilson," said Miss Pumphrey. Stilson smirked.

Miss Pumphrey talked about multiplication. Ender doodled on his desk, drawing contour maps of mountainous islands and then telling his desk to display them in three dimensions from every angle. The teacher would know, of course, that he wasn't paying attention, but she wouldn't bother him. He always knew the answer, even when she thought he wasn't paying attention.

In the corner of his desk a word appeared and began marching around the perimeter of the desk. It was upside down and backward at first, but Ender knew what it said long before it reached the bottom of the desk and turned right side up.

THIRD

Ender smiled. He was the one who had figured out how to send messages and make them march—even as his secret enemy called him names, the method of delivery praised him. It was not his fault he was a Third. It was the government's idea, they were the ones who authorized it—how else could a Third like Ender have got into school? And now the monitor was gone. The experiment entitled Andrew Wiggin hadn't worked out after all. If they could, he was sure they would like to rescind the waivers that had allowed him to be born at all. Didn't work, so erase the experiment.

The bell rang. Everyone signed off their desks or hurriedly typed in reminders to themselves. Some were dumping lessons or data into their computers at home. A few gathered at the printers while something they wanted to show was printed out. Ender spread his hands over the child-size keyboard near the edge of the desk and wondered what it would feel like to have hands as large as a grown-up's. They must feel so big and awkward, thick stubby fingers and beefy palms. Of course, they had bigger keyboards—but how could their thick fingers draw a fine line, the way Ender could, a thin line so precise that he could make it spiral seventy-nine times from the center to the edge of the desk without the lines ever touching or overlapping. It gave him something to do while the teacher droned on about arithmetic. Arithmetic! Valentine had taught him arithmetic when he was three.

"Are you all right, Andrew?"

"Yes, ma'am."

"You'll miss the bus."

Ender nodded and got up. The other kids were gone. They would be waiting, though, the bad ones. His monitor wasn't perched on his neck, hearing what he heard and seeing what he saw. They could say what they liked. They might even hit him now—no one could see them anymore, and so no one would come to Ender's rescue. There were advantages to the monitor, and he would miss them.

It was Stilson, of course. He wasn't bigger than most other kids, but he was bigger than Ender. And he had some others with him. He always did.

"Hey Third."

Don't answer. Nothing to say.

"Hey, Third, we're talkin to you, Third, hey bugger-lover, we're talkin to you."

Can't think of anything to answer. Anything I say will make it worse. So will saying nothing.

"Hey, Third, hey, turd, you flunked out, huh? Thought you were better than us, but you lost your little birdie, Thirdie, got a bandaid on your neck."

"Are you going to let me through?" Ender asked.

"Are we going to let him through? Should we let him through?" They all laughed. "Sure we'll let you through. First we'll let your arm through, then your butt through, then maybe a piece of your knee."

The others chimed in now. "Lost your birdie, Thirdie. Lost your birdie, Thirdie."

Stilson began pushing him with one hand; someone behind him then pushed him toward Stilson.

"See-saw, marjorie daw," somebody said.

"Tennis!"

"Ping-pong!"

This would not have a happy ending. So Ender decided that he'd rather not be the unhappiest at the end. The next time Stilson's arm came out to push him, Ender grabbed at it. He missed.

"Oh, gonna fight me, huh? Gonna fight me, Thirdie?"

The people behind Ender grabbed at him, to hold him.

Ender did not feel like laughing, but he laughed. "You mean it takes this many of you to fight one Third?"

"We're people, not Thirds, turd face. You're about as strong as a fart!"

But they let go of him. And as soon as they did, Ender kicked out high and hard, catching Stilson square in the breastbone. He dropped. It took Ender by surprise—he hadn't thought to put Stilson on the ground with one kick. It didn't occur to him that Stilson didn't take a fight like this seriously, that he wasn't prepared for a truly desperate blow.

For a moment, the others backed away and Stilson lay motionless. They were all wondering if he was dead. Ender, however, was trying to figure out a way to forestall vengeance. To keep them from taking him in a pack tomorrow. I have to win this now, and for all time, or I'll fight it every day and it will get worse and worse.

Ender knew the unspoken rules of manly warfare, even though he was only six. It was forbidden to strike the opponent who lay helpless on the ground; only an animal would do that.

So Ender walked to Stilson's supine body and kicked him again, viciously, in the ribs. Stilson groaned and rolled away from him. Ender walked around him and kicked him again, in the crotch. Stilson could not make a sound; he only doubled up and tears streamed out of his eyes.

Then Ender looked at the others coldly. "You might be having some idea of ganging up on me. You could probably beat me up pretty bad. But just remember what I do to people who try to hurt me. From then on you'd be wondering when I'd get you, and how bad it would be." He kicked Stilson in the face. Blood from his nose spattered the ground nearby. "It wouldn't be this bad," Ender said. "It would be worse."

He turned and walked away. Nobody followed him. He turned a corner into the corridor leading to the bus stop. He could hear the boys behind him saying, "Geez. Look at him. He's wasted." Ender leaned his head against the wall of the corridor and cried until the bus came. I am just like Peter. Take my monitor away, and I am just like Peter.

ENDERS GAME. Copyright 1977, 1985, 1991 by Orson Scott Card.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2558 )
Rating Distribution

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4 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2014

    Awesome! One of my favorite books. I was hooked from beginning t

    Awesome! One of my favorite books. I was hooked from beginning to end! I watched the movie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

    Best book i ever read. The edition i read had a letter frofrom s

    Best book i ever read. The edition i read had a letter frofrom someone who had read the book. The person who wrote that letter had my smae name and said the Ender thatthought just like them. When i read i thoight or think of things the same way. The only exseption os that well i never killed anyone. 
    And never wil.
    But still best book ever!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2013

    Great book.

    Great book.

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  • Posted December 10, 2013

    Every time I had heard about the book Ender¿s Game everyone had

    Every time I had heard about the book Ender’s Game everyone had said that it was an awesome book, and I totally agree! I’ll be honest though, the only reason I actually got around to reading this book was because we had an independent reading assignment in my English class. Although it was mandatory that I read a book I didn’t have to choose Ender’s Game and I am very glad I did because I liked the science fiction story line and the hero cycle adventure that occurs throughout the novel.
    Ender’s Game is a novel by Orson Scott Card set in the future during a war between the people Earth and a highly intelligent alien race called Bugger’s. After losing many commanders in the previous war against the Bugger’s, Earths military leaders set up a school in space where they train kids from a very young age to be commanders. The main character of the book, Ender Wiggin, is a six year-old boy who is taken away from his home and his family to go train to become a commander. Throughout the novel Ender is faced with many issues such as anger, self-doubt, deception, and way too much pressure; these issues all play a role in how Ender’s character develops throughout the book and the person who he ultimately ends up being at the end of the book.
    I enjoyed Ender’s Game’s storyline and the ending over all but there were something’s about the book that I did not like and sometimes did not understand. At the beginning of every chapter there would be a conversation between two people about Ender that would be very vague and sometimes confusing especially since most of the time you never knew what the people were talking about and you never found out later in the chapter. In my opinion Ender’s Game was a good book but I thought that the author Orson Scott Card seemed to skirt around a lot of major things in the story and never give you a deeper understanding of the event or how it would impact Ender in the future.
    Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card is a very good book and even though the writing style could use some changes or clarification of major events I would recommend this book to anyone, teens or adults, who are looking for a book filled with fun, futuristic science fiction ideas and a story about a boy figuring out what his role in life is going to need to be to help Earth and the people he loves win the war against the Bugger’s, no matter what the costs.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2013

    I do not recommend this book to anyone. The minute you open this

    I do not recommend this book to anyone. The minute you open this book its like the pages are singing you a lullaby that can make you fall asleep with in seconds. If you ever read this book and you didn't like it i suggest you should take it and use it as toilet paper. good night y'all

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I did buy the book to read before I went to see the movie. The m

    I did buy the book to read before I went to see the movie. The movie had great cinematography and incredible special effects but it would of fell short in plot if I didn't know the back ground emotions behind the characters by reading the the book. My advice, read the book first and let the amazing visuals of the movie enhance the story for you.




    Ender's Game is a mind blowing, ground breaking story telling by Orson Scott Card. 




    Ender is taken by the military at the age of six and modeled into the perfect military strategist. Ender is brilliant, he evaluates every situation, reasons others actions and marvelously sees more than those around him.




    You can't help but ponder the consequence of the actions taken by all the characters involved. Provoking and at times disturbing, Ender's Game will keep you invested till the end. 




    I am giving Ender's Game the book 4 Stars. You might ask, why only 4 stars...I felt the story randomly stalled but then would come back with a vengeance. I was blown away by the premise and captivated by Card's imagination...this is a book that will stick with you long after your done reading.




    Now for a little movie to book comparison (without any spoilers)...




    Ender is considerably older than six in the movie. Although he is a young teen and still a child, I found the movie Ender's actions are more believable than the action of a six year old. 




    Ender's siblings interactions are minimized in the movie but play a much more pivotal roll in the book. 




    The movie Ender develops stronger relationships with his fellow students. Where the book Ender is constantly kept from creating any bonds.




    In the end, the book was better than the movie! 




    Written by: Orson Scott Card
    Series: Ender Saga
    Sequence in Series: 1
    Print Length: 352 pages
    Publisher: Tor Books; Revised Edition, Movie Tie-In Edition edition Publicatin Date: April 1, 2010
    Sold by: Macmillan
    Rating: 4 Stars
    Genre: Science Fiction
    Age Recommendation: Young Adult 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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