Endgame: The End of the Debt SuperCycle and How It Changes Everything

( 22 )

Overview

Greece isn't the only country drowning in debt. The Debt Supercycle—when the easily managed, decades-long growth of debt results in a massive sovereign debt and credit crisis—is affecting developed countries around the world, including the United States. For these countries, there are only two options, and neither is good—restructure the debt or reduce it through austerity measures. Endgame details the Debt Supercycle and the sovereign debt crisis, and shows that, while there are no good choices, the worst choice...

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Overview

Greece isn't the only country drowning in debt. The Debt Supercycle—when the easily managed, decades-long growth of debt results in a massive sovereign debt and credit crisis—is affecting developed countries around the world, including the United States. For these countries, there are only two options, and neither is good—restructure the debt or reduce it through austerity measures. Endgame details the Debt Supercycle and the sovereign debt crisis, and shows that, while there are no good choices, the worst choice would be to ignore the deleveraging resulting from the credit crisis. The book:

  • Reveals why the world economy is in for an extended period of sluggish growth, high unemployment, and volatile markets punctuated by persistent recessions
  • Reviews global markets, trends in population, government policies, and currencies

Around the world, countries are faced with difficult choices. Endgame provides a framework for making those choices.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
In Endgame: The End of the Debt Supercycle and How It Changes Everything, Mauldin and Tepper pull no punches and get directly the point. ...Endgame is a veritable trip around the world, as Mauldin lays out the uncomfortable choices facing nearly every major country. While Mauldin’s analysis of the American debt problem is sobering, his comments on Europe are downright frightening…Given the noise dominating the newswires, it is refreshing to find clear, coherent thinking. Our compliments to Messrs. Mauldin and Tepper on a job well done.”
Charles Sizemore, HS Dent Research Analyst and Editor of the Sizemore Investment Letter
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118800027
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 10/28/2013
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 499,285
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

JOHN MAULDIN is a renowned financial expert, a multiple New York Times best-selling author, and a pioneering online commentator. His weekly e-newsletter, Thoughts From The Frontline, was one of the first publications to provide investors with free, unbiased information and guidance. Today, it is one of the most widely distributed investment newsletters in the world, translated into Chinese, Spanish and Italian. He is regularly seen on TV and in national print media. President of Millennium Wave Investments, he is the father of seven children (five adopted) and lives in Dallas, Texas.

JONATHAN TEPPER is the founder and Chief Editor of Variant Perception, a macroeconomic research group catering to hedge funds and high-net-worth individuals.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xiii

Introduction: Endgame 1

Part One: The End of the Debt Supercycle 11

Chapter 1: The Beginning of the End 15

Chapter 2: Why Greece Matters 31

Chapter 3: Let’s Look at the Rules 45

Chapter 4: The Burden of Lower Growth and More Frequent Recessions 73

Chapter 5: This Time Is Different 91

Chapter 6: The Future of Public Debt: An Unsustainable Path 109

Chapter 7: The Elements of Deflation 133

Chapter 8: Inflation and Hyperinflation 157

Part Two: A World Tour: Who Will Face Endgame First? 175

Chapter 9: The United States: The Mess We Find Ourselves In 181

Chapter 10: The European Periphery: A Modern-Day Gold Standard 215

Chapter 11: Eastern European Problems 233

Chapter 12: Japan: A Bug in Search of a Windshield 247

Chapter 13: The United Kingdom: How to Quietly Inflate Away Your Debt 261

Chapter 14: Australia: Could It Follow in Ireland's Footsteps? 273

Chapter 15: Unintended Consequences: Loose Monetary Policies and Emerging Markets 283

Conclusion: Investing and Profiting from Endgame 293

Epilogue: Some Final Thoughts 297

Notes 301

About the Authors 309

Index 311

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2011

    This is a sample?

    I sure can't decide anything about this book based on the 1 line "sample." 23 pages. Supposedly. But when that includes a table of contents, an acknowledgement, etc, etc, there is no sampling. Based on this I can't buy the book.

    3 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2011

    One of the most important books about money you'll ever read. Buy this book for everyone you care about.

    John Mauldin is neither a pessimist nor a market/political cheerleader. "Endgame" simply explains the political and sociological processes that have led America and the world to the difficult economic place that we find ourselves in. It is becoming evident to almost everyone that difficult fincancial decisons must be made at every level; from federal, state and local governments to businesses, individuals and families. "Endgame" makes it clear that there are no easy, pain-free choices remaining but that the worst course of action would be to try to continue "business as usual".

    Far from being just another expose of failed policies, "Endgame" provides both educational insight into economics and policy and potential courses of action that politicians and individuals may choose and possible results of these actions.

    If you care about your financial future, you'll want to read "Endgame" more than once!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Amid all the postmortems of the 2008 recession, this might be th

    Amid all the postmortems of the 2008 recession, this might be the bleakest. Financial gurus John Mauldin and Jonathan Tepper argue persuasively that no quick recovery is on the horizon. Instead, the world’s economies face years, perhaps decades, of tepid growth, roller-coaster markets and high unemployment. The authors combine their analysis with research from a variety of economists to reach the conclusion that deficits will continue to grow and politicians will continue to avoid making hard decisions. While their rambling reasoning is sometimes disjointed and their analysis presents nothing startlingly new, Mauldin and Tepper make an informed case that investors, consumers, managers and policy makers need to prepare for a rocky future that’s nothing like the comparatively easy years of the recent past. getAbstract recommends this sobering look at the future as important reading for those who want to follow the full spectrum of analysis.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 29, 2012

    "Takes a very complex subject & makes it reasonably un

    "Takes a very complex subject & makes it reasonably understandable. Bottom line: There is no way the world economy (or the US economy) can possibly get better for any significant amount of time, without first getting worse. The only question is how much worse. Will we make the tough decisions to immediately accept and minimize the pain? Or will we make the politically easier decisions to procrastinate and thereby increase the ultimate pain?"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2012

    WAVRNS HOUSE

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 14, 2012

    not recommended

    The text is fine bur due to the nature of the book (finance) there are
    quite a few charts & graphs that are almost impossible to read. I will
    probably have to buy the hard copy so I can get the information.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 25, 2011

    Must Read For Investors

    J. Mauldin clearly describes how and why the current world-wide economic challenges with debt are different from the business recessions endured over the past 60 years, and what you can do to protect your portfolios.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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