Enemy at the Gates

( 3 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Andrew Velez
With Enemy at the Gates, two-time Academy Award-winning composer James Horner (Titanic) once again demonstrates his eloquent skill at dramatizing the life-and-death, epic events of the films he scores. Horner's score to Jean-Jacques Annaud's passionate story of dueling German and Soviet snipers during World War II's seven-month-long Battle of Stalingrad is his most classically constructed work yet. He wrote Enemy at the Gates for an unusually large orchestra and chorus. At the start, a soft violin- and horn-accented passage, "The River Crossing to Stalingrad," evolves into a startlingly ominous moment, with a haunting string arrangement sustaining the song's tension. ...
See more details below
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (6) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $5.20   
  • Used (1) from $1.99   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Andrew Velez
With Enemy at the Gates, two-time Academy Award-winning composer James Horner (Titanic) once again demonstrates his eloquent skill at dramatizing the life-and-death, epic events of the films he scores. Horner's score to Jean-Jacques Annaud's passionate story of dueling German and Soviet snipers during World War II's seven-month-long Battle of Stalingrad is his most classically constructed work yet. He wrote Enemy at the Gates for an unusually large orchestra and chorus. At the start, a soft violin- and horn-accented passage, "The River Crossing to Stalingrad," evolves into a startlingly ominous moment, with a haunting string arrangement sustaining the song's tension. Later, in "Bitter News," a single flute echoes the film's recurring theme of grief and survival. Meanwhile, in "Factory," oboes and violas play against timpani and brass to help re-create battlefield scenes with what feel like thunderous blocks of sound. Sweeping and filled with light and shadows, Horner's Enemy at the Gates surpasses his previous work and is a Titanic-sized accomplishment.
All Music Guide - Jason Ankeny
Given the longevity of his career, it's somewhat surprising to note that 2001's Enemy at the Gates represents composer James Horner's first foray into the World War II milieu, and while the score cherry-picks a handful of elements from previous Horner efforts spanning from Glory to Willow, it's nevertheless his most accomplished and original work in some time. A bleak, melancholy work nevertheless punctuated by moments of sweeping symphonic beauty, Enemy at the Gates exhibits a musical and emotional economy rare in the Horner canon -- when the drama finally erupts, it means something. Fans of the composer will find much to savor here, and even detractors will discover passages meriting commendation.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/13/2001
  • Label: Sony
  • UPC: 696998952225
  • Catalog Number: 89522
  • Sales rank: 53,284

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 The River Crossing to Stalingrad - Marcia Crayford (15:13)
  2. 2 The Hunter Becomes the Hunted - Marcia Crayford (5:53)
  3. 3 Vassili's Fame Spreads - Marcia Crayford (3:40)
  4. 4 Koulikov - Marcia Crayford (5:13)
  5. 5 The Dream - Marcia Crayford (2:35)
  6. 6 Bitter News - Marcia Crayford (2:38)
  7. 7 The Tractor Factory - Marcia Crayford (6:43)
  8. 8 A Sniper's War - Marcia Crayford (3:25)
  9. 9 Sacha's Risk - Marcia Crayford (5:37)
  10. 10 Betrayal - Marcia Crayford (11:28)
  11. 11 Danilov's Confession - Marcia Crayford (7:13)
  12. 12 Tania (End Credits) - Marcia Crayford (6:53)
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
James Horner Primary Artist, Conductor
Terry Edwards Track Performer
London Voices Choir, Chorus
Marcia Crayford Concert Mistress
Terry Edwards Choir Master
Technical Credits
James Horner Producer, Orchestration
Budd Carr Executive Producer
J.A.C. Redford Executive Producer
Simon Rhodes Producer, Engineer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    James Horner has embodied the emotions of WWII

    The music truly makes you feel connected with the story. The title song is incredibly moving. It touches your heart, as does the movie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Shades of the Braveheart soundtrack

    Of course, Enemy at the Gates doesn't compare to the Braveheart soundtrack but you can hear some of its influences. This album might be described as a mix between Braveheart and a May Day parade in the former Soviet Union; yes, my review is premature, this is a good soundtrack but I DO want to see how Horner's score fits in with the movie when it gets released in a couple of days. That, after all, is what a soundtrack is for and how it should be evaluated.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews