The Enemy Within: A History of Spies, Spymasters and Espionage

The Enemy Within: A History of Spies, Spymasters and Espionage

by Terry Crowdy
     
 

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To gain the upper hand in conflict the ability to know what your enemy is planning is vital. Massive amounts of money have been spent and many lives have been lost in pursuit of this objective. From biblical times to the present day, leaders have employed espionage on and off the battlefield in the quest for victory. Tactics might differ, from dirty tricks and theft

Overview

To gain the upper hand in conflict the ability to know what your enemy is planning is vital. Massive amounts of money have been spent and many lives have been lost in pursuit of this objective. From biblical times to the present day, leaders have employed espionage on and off the battlefield in the quest for victory. Tactics might differ, from dirty tricks and theft to interrogation and torture, but the aim is the same - to outmanoeuvre your enemy and emerge triumphant. Separating myth from reality, the Enemy Within, traces the history of espionage from its development in ancient times through to the end of the Cold War and beyond, shedding light on the clandestine activities that have so often tipped the balance in times of war. This detailed account delves into the murky depths of the realm of the spymasters and their spies, revealing many amazing, and often bizarre stories, along the way. From the Monkey hanged as a spy during the Napoleonic wars to the British Double Cross Committee in World War II and from Ivan the Terrible's forming of the first Russian secret police in the 16th century to the infiltration of the IRA in the 20th century, this journey through the history of espionage shows us that be they thrill seekers or madmen, fanatics or tricksters no two spies are alike and their fascinating stories are fraught with danger and intrigue.


CHAPTER HEADS In ancient times. Through dark ages. Spy, Britannia! Espionage in the Age of Reason. Vive la revolution! Napoleon's 'secret part'. Uncivil war. The godfather of secret service. Spy fever. Double-cross agents and radio games. Axis spies against America. Spies of the Soviet era. With no end in sight.


From the Hardcover edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Crowdy, who has previously written for Osprey on the uniforms and organizations of French revolutionary armed forces, reflects his publisher's expanding horizons in this survey of espionage from ancient times to America's invasion of Iraq. Since Egypt fought the Hittites, he observes, secret agents have been dispatched to spy and perform other deeds that may be against the law but are perceived to be in the country's best interest. Though Crowdy is familiar with standard sources, this is a work of narrative and anecdote rather than analysis, and succeeds within that context. He discusses the role of intelligence collecting in creating and sustaining the Persian, Roman and Mongol empires, offering Judas as an early example of a double agent. The development of professional secret services in early modern Europe segues into the often-overlooked role of intelligence in the Revolutionary/Napoleonic era, making for tales of spy and counterspy that are the most interesting in the book. As Crowdy moves into more recent times, he stresses increasing technological competition, reflecting the increasing difficulty of mounting human intelligence operations in modern national security states. His conclusion is a paradox: secret services must be kept under control, yet be effective enough "to make a difference." (Oct. 31) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Intelligence operations are a hot topic. But since most recent books have a more narrow or current focus, a popular account of the high points in espionage through the ages is welcome. Crowdy recounts important activities, many of them already well known, but without detailing how much they affected history. The text emphasizes actual undercover operations, not the analysis or utilization of gathered intelligence. Crowdy has published works with Osprey on the French military during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic eras, and these sections are among the strongest. Also interesting is the section on Germany's infiltration of France before world war I. That said, the book lacks a good introduction and a conclusion. This title is not a deep examination of the topic; for that, one may want to look at Janusz Piekalkiewicz's World History of Espionage: Agents, Systems, Operations. Use this volume for a general overview, then move on to more specialized monographs. An optional purchase but certainly suitable for personal, public, and undergraduate libraries. (Index not seen.)-Daniel K. Blewett, Coll. of DuPage Lib., Glen Ellyn, IL Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780962245
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
12/20/2011
Series:
General Military
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
1,102,724
File size:
641 KB

Meet the Author

Terry Crowdy has a life long passion for history which was first kindled working on the Fort Amhurst restoration project in the Medway Towns on the coast of England, where he spent his school summer vacations as a fortress tunnel guide. Through this association he developed a passionate interest in the Napoleonic Wars and participated in many of the bicentennial celebrations marking the wars of the French Revolution. His enthusiasm led to significant research in the French military archives at the Château de Vincennes near Paris. Terry became equally passionate about the history of 'Secret War' - in particular military espionage - a subject he feels is too often overlooked. After a long stint as bass guitarist for the rock group "Soma", Terry put pen to paper and is now the author of a number of books and articles on military history. He lives in Kent, England. The author lives in Kent, UK.


From the Hardcover edition.

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