Energy Management Systems: Operation and Control of Electric Energy Transmission Systems

Overview

Network control is a young discipline and yet already a considerable number of textbooks have been published on the topic. The aim of this book is to give a comprehensive description of Energy Management Systems (EMS) from the operator's point of view, with regard to their hardware and to their software aspects. The scope of the book is restricted to network control of electrical transmission systems and emphasis is placed on systematic description of the different operational planning aspects. The book provides ...
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Paperback (Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1991)
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Overview

Network control is a young discipline and yet already a considerable number of textbooks have been published on the topic. The aim of this book is to give a comprehensive description of Energy Management Systems (EMS) from the operator's point of view, with regard to their hardware and to their software aspects. The scope of the book is restricted to network control of electrical transmission systems and emphasis is placed on systematic description of the different operational planning aspects. The book provides a framework within which EMS may be realised, considering both the present state of the art and future developments in this multidisciplinary field. A carefully edited glossary contains the most important terms used in the field of energy management systems.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Lecture notes for a graduate course in energy management systems, or as a tutorial for engineers entering the field. Presents a framework for unifying hardware, software, and human operator approaches. Includes a glossary. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783642840432
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Publication date: 12/8/2011
  • Series: Electric Energy Systems and Engineering Series
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1991
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 183
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.42 (d)

Table of Contents

1 Introduction.- 1.1 Electric energy systems.- 1.2 Power system engineering.- 1.3 Evolution of power system control technology.- 1.4 Control centre justification.- 1.4.1 Associated effort.- 1.4.2 Factors justifying a new control centre.- 1.4.3 Conclusions.- 2 System engineering aspects of power system operation.- 2.1 Classification.- 2.2 Time decomposition.- 2.2.1 Pre-dispatch.- 2.2.2 Dispatch.- 2.2.3 Post-dispatch.- 2.3 Network level decomposition.- 2.3.1 Transmission.- 2.3.2 Sub-transmission.- 2.3.3 Distribution.- 2.3.4 General remarks.- 2.4 Mode decomposition.- 2.4.1 Operation.- 2.4.2 Operational planning.- 2.5 Operation state decomposition.- 2.6 Activity decomposition.- 2.6.1 Power management.- 2.6.2 Network management.- 2.7 Control decomposition.- 2.7.1 Centralised control.- 2.7.2 Decentralised control.- 2.7.3 Centralised versus decentralised policy.- 2.8 User oriented decomposition.- 2.9 Analysis decomposition.- 2.9.1 Primary analysis functions.- 2.9.2 Secondary analysis functions.- 2.10 Control flow decomposition.- 3 Typical energy control centre functions.- 3.1 System monitoring and security.- 3.2 System economy.- 3.2.1 Minimum cost of operation.- 3.2.2 Minimum active power transmission losses.- 3.2.3 Minimum deviation from a specific operating point.- 3.2.4 Minimum number of controls scheduled.- 3.3 System control.- 3.4 Restorative control.- 4 Power system control centre: hardware structure.- 4.1 Overview.- 4.2 Remote terminal unit.- 4.3 Communication.- 4.4 The real-time computer system.- 4.4.1 Central processing unit.- 4.4.2 Computer memory system.- 4.4.3 Man-machine interface.- 4.5 Review of hardware structure for network control centres.- 4.5.1 The dual computer configuration.- 4.5.2 The front-end computer configuration.- 4.5.3 Triple configuration.- 4.5.4 The quad computer configuration.- 4.5.5 Distributed system configurations.- 4.6 Hardware design considerations.- 4.7 Hardware obsolescence.- 4.8 Performance of SCADA/EMS.- 5 Power system control centre: software structure.- 5.1 Overview.- 5.2 Data acquisition subsystem.- 5.2.1 Collection of data.- 5.2.2 Error checking and plausibility tests.- 5.2.3 Conversion to engineering units.- 5.2.4 Limit checking.- 5.2.5 Handling of alarms.- 5.3 Supervisory control subsystem.- 5.4 Real-time software environment.- 5.4.1 Operating system.- 5.4.2 Real-time traffic manager subsystem.- 5.5 Data base management system.- 5.5.1 Overview.- 5.5.2 Requirements.- 5.5.3 Software aspects.- 5.5.4 Structure of the data base.- 5.5.5 Storage and effort requirements.- 5.5.6 Access methods.- 5.5.7 Performance requirements.- 5.6 Man-machine interface.- 5.6.1 Importance.- 5.6.2 Human factors.- 5.6.3 Display formats.- 5.6.4 Features, design, requirements.- 5.7 Inter-utility communication subsystem.- 6 Power system control centre: dispatcher’s activities.- 6.1 Introduction.- 6.2 Salient features of the operator activity.- 6.3 A conceptual model of the dispatcher’s activity.- 6.4 Requirements.- 6.5 Trends in power dispatch operator’s activity.- 7 Power system and dispatch training simulator.- 7.1 Introduction.- 7.2 Power system technological requirements.- 7.3 Functions of a training simulator.- 7.3.1 General functions.- 7.3.2 Specific functions.- 7.4 Modelling aspects.- 7.5 Different types of training simulators.- 7.5.1 Stand-alone version.- 7.5.2 Integrated version.- 7.5.3 Implementation.- 7.5.4 Economic considerations.- 7.6 Training scenarios and training sessions.- 7.7 Concluding remarks.- 8 Existing energy management systems.- 8.1 General remarks.- 8.2 Energy management systems in a US utility.- 8.2.1 System characteristics.- 2.2.2 The concept of hierarchical control.- 2.2.3 Enhanced control and security assessment.- 8.2.4 Implementation.- 8.3 Energy management systems in Germany.- 8.3.1 Introduction.- 8.3.2 Load-frequency control.- 8.3.3 Energy management systems.- 8.3.4 Concluding remarks.- 8.4 Energy management systems in developing countries.- 8.4.1 Introduction.- 8.4.2 Electrical characteristics of longitudinal power systems.- 8.4.3 Security assessment in longitudinal power systems.- 8.4.4 Concluding remarks.- 9 Project management of energy management systems.- 9.1 Overview.- 9.2 Stages in the implementation of a new control centre.- 9.2.1 Feasibility study.- 9.2.2 System justification.- 9.2.3 Functional requirements and preliminary specifications.- 9.2.4 Releasing the specification.- 9.2.5 Evaluating proposals.- 9.2.6 Negotiating a contract.- 9.2.7 Design specifications.- 9.2.8 Implementation and organisation.- 9.2.9 Training.- 9.2.10 System operation.- 9.3 A step-by-step plan for implementing a new control centre.- 9.3.1 Preliminary system design (pre-contract).- 9.3.2 Work statement.- 9.3.3 System design (post-contract).- 9.3.4 Detailed design specifications.- 9.3.5 Development.- 9.3.6 System integration and tests.- 9.3.7 System acceptance.- 9.4 Design, development, and maintenance of software.- 9.4.1 Software development phases.- 9.4.2 Concluding remarks.- 10 Expert systems for power system operation.- 10.1 Overview.- 10.2 Security monitoring and control.- 10.3 Definitions.- 10.4 Structure of the expert system.- 10.5 Possibilities and limits of expert systems.- 10.6 Applications.- 10.7 Conclusions.- References.
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