Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars

Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars

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by Paul Ingrassia
     
 

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From Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Ingrassia comes a narrative of America like no other: a cultural history that explores how cars have both propelled and reflected the national experience—from the Model T to the Prius.

From the assembly lines of Henry Ford to the open roads of Route 66, America’s history is a vehicular

Overview

From Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Ingrassia comes a narrative of America like no other: a cultural history that explores how cars have both propelled and reflected the national experience—from the Model T to the Prius.

From the assembly lines of Henry Ford to the open roads of Route 66, America’s history is a vehicular history–an idea brought brilliantly to life in this major work by Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Paul Ingrassia.

Engines of Change is a wondrous epic in fifteen automobiles, including the Corvette, the Beetle, and the Chevy Corvair, as well as the personalities and tales behind them: Robert McNamara’s unlikely role in Lee Iacocca’s Mustang, Henry Ford’s Model T, as well as Honda’s Accord, the BMW 3 Series, and the Jeep, among others. Through these cars and these characters, Ingrassia shows how the car has expressed the particularly American tension between the lure of freedom and the obligations of utility. Narrative history of the highest caliber, Engines of Change is an entirely edifying new way to look at the American story.

Editorial Reviews

Michiko Kakutani
…wonderfully entertaining…In this book [Ingrassia] draws upon his expertise covering the car business to give us a highly informed but breezy narrative history of the vehicles that have shaped and reflected American culture. Along the way he also gives us some sharp snapshots of the engineers, businessmen and ad people who helped design and promote these automobiles…
—The New York Times
From the Publisher
"A thoughtful, propulsive assay of the machine that changed a nation, a world." —The Wall Street Journal
Library Journal
"Historians rightly agree that the Model T Ford is the most influential and important car in American history," writes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ingrassia (deputy editor in chief, Reuters; Crash Course: The American Automobile Industry's Road from Glory to Disaster), who here tells the stories of 15 American cars. "The more elegant and delicate question is which car is the second most influential." Ingrassia considers autos that have changed American society or captured the spirit of the times—not just the fastest or the most famous. Even the casual student of history knows about the Model T's influence on assembly-line manufacturing and affordability for the average working family. But what about the transition of the VW, first known for being Hitler's car and later as the favored transport of hippies? Or the minivan's role in the rise of the now ubiquitous soccer mom? The epic failure of the Corvair, Ingrassia points out, had lasting effects on automobile safety, the career of Ralph Nader, and the 2000 presidential election. VERDICT While readers may debate the author's choices (no AMC Gremlin?), they'll be entertained by this appealing social history, served up with just the right amount of sly humor and nostalgia. (Photos not seen.)—Susan Belsky, Oshkosh P. L., WI
Kirkus Reviews
A Pulitzer Prize–winning automotive reporter's cultural history of 15 cars that helped shape American life. Car nut and Reuters deputy editor in chief Ingrassia (Crash Course: The American Automobile Industry's Road from Glory to Disaster, 2010) makes it clear that he's not writing about the best cars in American history, but the ones that have had the most impact on American culture (which also doesn't always mean American-made cars). Beginning with the most obvious choice, Henry Ford's Model T, Ingrassia proceeds to make his case for the cultural relevancy of Cadillac tail fins, the Honda Accord, BMWs, the Volkswagen Beetle, the Chrysler Minivan and more. Some of his more entertaining and informative stories are about automotive failures--e.g., hipster car-industry kingpin John DeLorean and his once-promising career at Pontiac, a tenure that ended with ugly, impractical cars and a botched cocaine deal. Ingrassia plays up the colossal technical flop that was the dangerous, rear-engine Chevy Corvair as the second-most influential car of all time, considering its unintended role as the car that sparked huge legal reforms in the automobile industry and launched Ralph Nader's career. Perhaps the book's most interesting section examines the improbable metamorphosis in public perception of the Volkswagen Beetle, which went from Hitler's favorite ride to a 1960s hippie-chic countercultural statement on wheels. The same kind of socially conscious symbolic value resurfaced decades later in the form of the hybrid Toyota Prius, the ride of choice for left-leaning, eco-friendly affluence. Ingrassia succeeds in fashioning well-researched, swift-paced narratives around each of these 15 select automobiles. Using colorful detail, he effectively recasts these significant driving machines in their respective cultural contexts and brings to life the eras they influenced. An intelligent and accessible mix of car-worship and cultural studies.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781451640649
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
05/14/2013
Pages:
395
Sales rank:
772,511
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

1

WHEN HENRY MET SALLIE: CAR WARS AND CULTURE CLASHES AT THE DAWN OF AMERICA’S AUTOMOTIVE AGE

Someone should write an erudite essay on the moral, physical, and esthetic effect of the Model T Ford on the American nation. Two generations of Americans knew more about the Ford coil than the clitoris, about the planetary system of gears than the solar system of stars.

—John Steinbeck, Cannery Row1

Just north of downtown Detroit on a small street called Piquette sits an inner-city storefront church called the Abundant Faith Cathedral. By the looks of the surrounding weed-choked lots and empty factories, abundant faith is exactly what’s needed, not to mention plenty of hope. The neighborhood is a postindustrial ghetto, although right across the street from the church is a functioning business called the General Linen & Uniform Service. It occupies the first floor of an old building where, as unlikely as it seems, modern America began.

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From the Publisher
"A thoughtful, propulsive assay of the machine that changed a nation, a world." —-The Wall Street Journal

Meet the Author

Paul Ingrassia, formerly the Detroit bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal and later the president of Dow Jones Newswire, is the deputy editor-in-chief of Reuters. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1993 (with Joseph B. White) for reporting on management crises at General Motors, he is the author of Crash Course: The American Automobile Industry’s Road from Glory to Disaster.

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Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
hhlucky More than 1 year ago
In this book the author actually covers a lot more then just 15 cars. He gives us a brief concise history of American Motoring with an emphasas on cars that caused or underscored social trends, from the Model T to the Prius. His snappy prose keeps the material moving along, and he gives just enough detail to satisfy most readers, except for maybe the more serious gearheads. Some readers might argue as to which 15 cars should make this list. The Chrysler Airflow,'57 Chevy, and Ford Taurus are barely mentioned, and the hot rod and custom trends of the 40's & 50's are virtually ignored. There is a heavy emphasis on the buying habits of yuppies - when was the last time you heard anyone mention the 1927 LaSalle - but the author does make a good case for his picks. Read this book yourself and see if you agree!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago