BN.com Gift Guide

Engines Of Logic

( 1 )

Overview

Computers are everywhere today—at work, in the bank, in artist's studios, in our pockets—yet they remain to many of us objects of irreducible mystery. How can today's computers perform such a bewildering variety of tasks if computing is just glorified arithmetic? The answer, as Martin Davis lucidly illustrates, lies in the fact that computers are engines of logic. Their hardware and software embody concepts developed over centuries by logicians such as Leibniz, Boole, and Gödel, culminating in the amazing ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $7.26   
  • New (2) from $105.00   
  • Used (7) from $0.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$105.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(194)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$133.71
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(310)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Computers are everywhere today—at work, in the bank, in artist's studios, in our pockets—yet they remain to many of us objects of irreducible mystery. How can today's computers perform such a bewildering variety of tasks if computing is just glorified arithmetic? The answer, as Martin Davis lucidly illustrates, lies in the fact that computers are engines of logic. Their hardware and software embody concepts developed over centuries by logicians such as Leibniz, Boole, and Gödel, culminating in the amazing insights of Alan Turing. Readers will come away from this book with a revelatory understanding of how and why computers work. 8 b/w photographs. Published in hardcover as The Universal Computer.

Author Biography: Martin Davis's other books include Computability and Unsolvability. A professor emeritus at New York University, he is currently a visiting scholar at the University of California-Berkeley.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Andrew Hodges
Erudite, gripping and humane, Martin Davis shows the extraordinary individuals through whom the groundwork of the computer came into being.
Dennis Shasha
Martin Davis speaks about logic with the love and touch of a sculptor speaking about stone.
John McCarthy
Anyone who works with computers today, who seeks to look into the electronic future, can profit greatly from reading [this].
Raymond Smullyan
Delightfully entertaining and most instructive!
Wired
[A]n elegant history of the search for the boundaries of logic and the machines that live within them.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393322293
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/1/2001
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 270
  • Product dimensions: 0.61 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 8.50 (d)

Table of Contents

PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
Chapter One: Leibniz's Dream
Chapter Two: Boole Turns Logic into Algebra
Chapter Three: Frege: From Breakthrough to Despair
Chapter Four: Cantor: Detour through Infinity
Chapter Five: Hilbert to the Rescue
Chapter Six: Gödel Upsets the Applecart
Chapter Seven: Turing Conceives of the All-Purpose Computer
Chapter Eight: Making the First Universal Computers
Chapter Nine: Beyond Leibniz's Dream
EPILOGUE
NOTES
REFERENCES
INDEX
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 19, 2012

    Highly recommended - answers "why do I need to know math for computers"?

    Sometimes it takes a long time to understand the motivation for a subject you're engaged in studying. Sometimes you can just read a book. This is such a book.

    During my studies of computer science I frequently baulked at the amount of mathematics I was being presented with and didn't understand how to connect that world to the world of programming I lived and breathed. Had I read this work in my first year that confusion would have been lessened.

    This is an easy to read exploration of the people and ideas behind modern computers as opposed to a computer book. Davis' exposition is clear and easy to read, with enough details to be engaging but few enough to be readily digestible.

    A must read for anyone interested in how math and logic play a role in computers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)