Enoteca: Simple, Delicious Recipes in the Italian Wine Bar Tradition

Overview

Joyce Goldstein's gorgeous cookbook celebrating the delightful foods served in Italian wine bars is now available in paperback. In Italy, the enoteca tradition captures the heart of what is for Italians la dolce vitasmall plates of simple, delicious fare, complemented by a glass or bottle of wine, and good company. This beautifully designed, exquisitely photographed cookbook tells the history of wine bars in Italy and features authentic, timeless recipes and their fascinating origins. From tasty dishes of omelets...

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Overview

Joyce Goldstein's gorgeous cookbook celebrating the delightful foods served in Italian wine bars is now available in paperback. In Italy, the enoteca tradition captures the heart of what is for Italians la dolce vitasmall plates of simple, delicious fare, complemented by a glass or bottle of wine, and good company. This beautifully designed, exquisitely photographed cookbook tells the history of wine bars in Italy and features authentic, timeless recipes and their fascinating origins. From tasty dishes of omelets made with wild greens and stuffed pastas to fresh fruit tarts and regional cheeseseach accompanied by a wine recommendationEnoteca is anyone's passport to the Italian wine bar experiencewhen in Rome...or right at home.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Dating back to ancient Rome, the enoteca, or wine bar where people gather to relax, chat, taste regional wines and munch on bruschette is popular again. Goldstein (Sephardic Flavors) captures this slow, sociable way of life with over 70 recipes from more than 30 enotecas in Italy, from Fried Zucchini Blossoms from Osteria del Vicolo Nuovo (near Bologna) to Roman Meat Loaf, from Rome's Bottega del Vino di Anacleto Bleve. Each recipe comes with suggested matching wines chosen by the author's son, sommelier Evan Goldstein which are adequate, but not exhaustive. Tantalizing finger foods such as Meat-Stuffed Deep-Fried Olives and Saffron Rice Croquettes are the book's strength, but there are plenty of entr?es, too, such as Sicilian Swordfish Rolls and Baked Clams with Oregano. Crab Salad on Polenta Crostini or Sweet Pepper Ragout serve as lunches, with Mascarpone and Fruit Tart or even Fig Salami with cheese to finish it off. One could make a meal, too, out of Stuffed Pasta Rolls although time-consuming homemade pasta is required. Home cooks will appreciate Goldstein's glossary of Italian cheeses and her impressive bibliography. Overall, this is an elegant, charming and easy-to-use book, with well-chosen recipes for light meals or snacks. The book will be nearly irresistible to wine lovers, but any cook with a passion for Italian food will find it enticing. Luminous color photos. (Sept.) Forecast: With wine bars enjoying increasing popularity in urban areas, in the United States as well as in Italy, this visually pleasing book with accolades from Robert Mondavi and Francis Ford Coppola should be a hit. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780811847377
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC
  • Publication date: 3/3/2005
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 196
  • Product dimensions: 1.00 (w) x 1.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Joyce Goldstein is a nationally known chef, author, teacher, and Mediterranean cooking expert. Her numerous cookbooks include, most recently, Italian Slow and Savory (0-8118-4238-X) and Solo Suppers (0-8118-3620-7). She lives in San Francisco.

Angela Wyant is a Sacramento-based photographer whose work has appeared in a variety of publications, including Food & Wine, and Travel & Leisure magazines.

Evan Goldstein is a Master Sommelier. He makes his home in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Read an Excerpt


Chapter One


EVAN GOLDSTEIN'S
INTRODUCTION TO THE WINE NOTES


It goes by many names: the Italian enoteca, theFrench bar à vin, or the relatively recent innovation,the American wine bar. As has beennoted, the roots of this institution are Italian,and the classic enoteca, with its resoundingfocus on wine, is the paradigm. What makes itso special is its foundation in regionalism.A bistecca alla fiorentina served with a young,juicy Chianti, and a sublime fonduta orrisotto accompanied by a famed Barbera orNebbiolo from Piedmont, are illustrativemodels of regional wine and food pairing.

    Regionalism is revealed in how the land,environment, and soils favor certain grapes;what vegetables and grains thrive there; andwhether the "meat" of the region is grazingcattle or sheep, mountain goats, or flocksof ducks. There is truth to the adage thatwine and food grow up together. But whatare you to do when the local match isn'tavailable to you? It's safe and easy to "gonative," but in reality, it may be impractical.Do sardines in saor truly taste better with aSoave from the Veneto than with any otherwine? Will lasagne alla bolognese only workwith a Sangiovese di Romagna? The answeris, of course, no. We can take comfort inknowing that wines will mimic one anotherglobally, and that the characteristics of awine, while lacking the identical flavor profile,can be found thousands of miles apart.

    What is explored in the subsequent pagesare both worlds. The salient foodand wineissues of each dish will be identified, followedby two wine selections: Italian winesand alternative wines. The first will be thelocal Italian choices, wines that may be fromwithin the same region as the dish, resultingin a traditional Italian pairing of wine andfood. These selections will take into accountthe availability factors encountered in theUnited States. The second category will suggestsimilar alternative wines that will pairwell with the food when the regional Italianchoice is unavailable.

    As with all matters of food and wine,however, you should go with your heartand your taste, not with your intellect. Don'toverthink the matches, and if you have otherwines that you prefer or with which youwould like to experiment, do so. Wine andfood pairing is supposed to be fun, to be anadventure. Your happiness at the table is whatcounts, and whether you find that happinessin a bottle of Italian wine, in an Americanwine, or even a French wine, it is the samehappiness. Buon appetito!


Piccoli piatti fritti

FRITTERS AND FRITTATAS


Arancine di riso allo zafferano SAFFRON RICE CROQUETTES

Crocchette di patate POTATO CROQUETTES

Frittata di primavera con asparagi, aglio verde, ed erbe
SPRINGTIME OMELET WITH ASPARAGUS, GREEN GARLIC,AND HERBS

Frittata con alle erbe di campagna e menta
OMELET WITH WILD GREENS AND MINT

Olive all'ascolana MEAT-STUFFED DEEP-FRIED OLIVES

Fiori di zucchini fritti FRIED ZUCCHINI BLOSSOMS

Ribollita refritto BEAN-AND-BREAD SOUP "PANCAKE


Piccoli piatti fritti
FRITTERS AND FRITTATAS


IN A CONVENTIONAL ITALIAN COOKBOOK, the recipes in thischapter would be among the antipasti, small dishes served at thestart of a meal. In a wine bar, however, you don't adhere to aformal meal structure. The entire repast might be an assortmentof small plates, little tastes to accompany selected glasses of wine:a handful of fried olives, a rice croquette, or a slice of frittata,perhaps paired with a small salad or some bread or grissini.


Frittatas are a classic wine bar offering.Although prepared in a manner similar to thatof the popular Spanish omelet knownas a tortilla, the Italian frittata is a lighter affair.A frittata con alle erbe di campagna e menta,flavored with an assortment of fresh herbs, is apale jade omelet, a celebration of greens andeggs. The frittata di primavera con asparagi, whilea specialty of Friuli and the Veneto, may beserved anywhere in Italy when springtimeasparagus madness strikes. Other omelets aremade with zucchini and zucchini blossoms,or artichokes and mint. They have beencooked ahead of time and hold well at roomtemperature. Order a slice and and it is placedon a plate, sometimes appearing solo andsometimes with a little salad or some vegetablessott'olio, marinated in olive oil and herbs.

    Ribollita refritto demonstrates the incredibleversatility of the Italian kitchen. Ribollitamakes its debut at the table as a vegetable andbean soup, not unlike a minestrone. On thesecond day, bread is added and the dishemerges again, reboiled, as a hearty bread-thickenedsoup. In its final, and probably best,menu appearance, a ladle of the very thickleftover soup is quickly sautéed and served asa bread-soup "pancake," but not before it isanointed with a drizzle of the very best oliveoil. While most soups are too liquid to showoff wine well, ribollita is a perfect hearty dishto accompany a glass of the local Chianti.

    Frying food to order seems like it wouldbe a risky proposition for the enoteca kitchen.But, with a simple deep-fryer on the premises,fritters and croquettes are a breeze. Thesesavory items have been assembled ahead oftime and need only a few minutes in bubblinghot oil, before they are popped onto a smallplate with an accompanying lemon wedge ora sprinkle of coarse salt. Such tidbits as oliveall'ascolana, the famous meat-stuffed deep-friedolives from the Marches; arancine di riso,Sicilian rice croquettes; or crocchette di patate,the potato croquettes that are popular nearlyeverywhere, are instant hits with enoteca customers.So, too, is the seasonal treat of fiori dizucchini fritti, fried zucchini blossoms withdiverse fillings. Savvy drinkers know that asparkling wine pairs naturally with all of thesefried specialties.


* * *


Arancine di riso allo zafferano

SAFFRON RICE CROQUETTES


Italians are loyal to their local dining and drinking establishments. The space now occupied by Milan's Le Cantine Isola, situated in a working-class neighborhood, has housedan enoteca for more than a century. Manager Saria Tagliaferri sent me a few lovely recipes and the story of the enoteca. In 1961, Giacomo Isola and his wife, Milly, took over the winebar and gave it their name. They were madly in love with each other and with wine, Tagliaferri wrote, and they made the shop their life. In 1993, after many years of working alone, they hired Giovanni Sarais to help run the place. Today, Giovanni is the owner and Luca, his son, is the sommelier and works the counter along with his mother, Tina. There are no tables, but Luca pampers his clients at the counter with tidbits such as potato croquettes (page 25),meatballs (page 123), and these rice croquettes. Arancine di riso are also a favorite of sommelier Salvatore Denaro of Enoiteca Il Bacco Felice, in the Umbrian town of Foligno, as he comes from Sicily, the home of arancine.


Makes 12 to 16 croquettes

1 1/2 cups water
1/2 teaspoon chopped saffron threads, steeped in 1/4 cup hot water for 15 minutes
1 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
1 cup Arborio rice
2 eggs
6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
Freshly ground black pepper
12 to 16 small cubes fresh mozzarella or Fontina cheese
i tablespoon chopped fresh marjoram or sage
3/4 cup fine dried bread crumbs
Olive or peanut oil for deep-frying


Combine the water, saffron infusion, and salt in a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the rice all at once, reduce the heat to low, and cover the pan. Simmer until the rice has absorbed all of the water and is cooked through but still sticky, about 20 minutes. Stir in the eggs and Parmesan and season with salt and pepper.
Remove from the heat and spoon the rice out onto a baking sheet, spreading it evenly to cool it quickly. Refrigerate until cold but not hard.
To make the croquettes, first roll the cheese cubes in the marjoram or sage to coat evenly. Spread the bread crumbs on a plate. Scoop up a spoonful of the rice into your hand. With a finger, make an indentation in the rice and tuck a cube of cheese into the center. Smooth the rice over the filling, forming a round ball about 2 inches in diameter. Dip the croquettes in the bread crumbs, covering evenly, and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Repeat until all the rice is used. Refrigerate the croquettes until you are ready to fry them or for up to 24 hours. (It is easier to fry them when they are fully chilled, as they have firmed up.)
To cook the croquettes, pour the oil to a depth of 3 inches into a deep sauté pan or saucepan and heat to 350°F. Add the croquettes, a few at a time, to the hot oil and fry, lifting them out of the oil a few times so that the cheese will have time to melt in the center, until golden brown, 6 to 7 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or tongs, transfer to paper towels to drain. Keep warm in a low oven for no more than 10 to 15 minutes. Repeat until all the croquettes are cooked, then serve piping hot.


MATCHING POINTER: While a sparking wine is an exquisite alternative, a white wine is better. Thesaffron offers an exotic nuance, and a suggestion of "sweetness" is delivered by the deep-frying andthe rice. A slightly off-dry wine is an interesting choice, too. * ITALIAN WINES: CHARDONNAY(ALTO ADIGE), ORVIETO * ALTERNATIVE WINES: SÉMILLON AND SAUVIGNON BLENDS (FRANCE),CHENIN BLANC WITH A SNAP OF SWEETNESS (FRANCE, SOUTH AFRICA, CALIFORNIA)


* * *


Crocchette di patate

POTATO CROQUETTES


Here's another tidbit that Luca Sarais serves at the busy counter atLe Cantine Isola (page 23). You can form these creamy and crunchy potato croquettes up to 8 hours in advance and refrigerate them until it is time to fry them.


Makes about 15 croquettes

2 pounds boiling potatoes, peeled and quartered
2 whole eggs, plus 2 egg yolks
3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup chopped fresh chives
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Freshly grated nutmeg or ground mace
1/2 cup all-purpose flour, or as needed
1 cup fine dried bread crumbs, or as needed
Vegetable or olive oil for deep-frying


Place the potatoes in a saucepan with salted water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and pass the warm potatoes through a ricer placed over a bowl, or mash well with a hand masher. Add the whole eggs, egg yolks, cheese, chives, and parsley to the potatoes and mix well. Season well with salt, pepper, and nutmeg or mace, again mixing well. Cover and chill for about 1 hour to make the mixture easier to shape.
Spread the flour on a plate, then spread some of the bread crumbs on a second plate. To make the croquettes, scoop up some potato mixture and form into a 2-inch-long oval, or into a round if you prefer. Dip the croquette first into the flour, coating evenly, and then into the crumbs, again coating evenly. Place on a rack or on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Repeat until all the potato mixture is used. Refrigerate the croquettes until you are ready to fry them.

(They will hold together better if they are cold.)

To cook, pour the oil to a depth of 3 inches into a deep sauté pan or saucepan and heat to 375°F. When the oil is hot, add the croquettes, a few at a time, to the hot oil and fry until golden, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or tongs, transfer to paper towels to drain. Keep warm in a low oven for no more than 10 to 15 minutes. Repeat until all croquettes are cooked, then serve piping hot.


MATCHING POINTER: Similar to the rice croquettes (page 23) but without the textural elements of the rice and saffron. The rich consistency requires a white wine with more body. Again, bubbles are nice, too. * ITALIAN WINES: CHARDONNAY (FRIULI, TUSCANY), CHARDONNAY- OR CORTESE-BASED OLTREPÒ PAVESE, STILL OR FRIZZANTE * ALTERNATIVE WINES: CHABLIS (BURGUNDY), CHARDONNAY (NEW ZEALAND)


* * *


Frittata di primavera con asparagi, aglio verde, ed erbe

SPRINGTIME OMELET WITH ASPARAGUS,
GREEN GARLIC, AND HERBS


Italian cooks, always in thrall with the rhythms of nature, celebrate springtime by putting wild asparagus and green garlic on the menu every day they are in season. The pencil-thin, slightly bitter asparagus can be simply cooked and served alone orincorporated into an omelet. For his frittata recipe, Salvatore Denaro of the Enoiteca Il BaccoFelice in Foligno, in the region of Umbria, recommends using erbe del bosco, or gathered wild herbs from the forest. We are not lucky enough to be able to forage in the Italian woods, so I suggest you assemble a pleasing mixture of herbs from what is available at your local market or in your garden, such as a combination of mint, flat-leaf parsley, thyme, marjoram, and tarragon. If you cannot find green garlic, use 1/2 cup chopped green onions in its place, sautéing them until soft but not brown, about 5 minutes. Then add 3 or 4 cloves garlic, minced, with the asparagus.


Serves 6

6 or 7 eggs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup chopped green garlic
1 1/2 pounds pencil-thin asparagus spears, tough ends removed, blanched for
3 minutes, drained, and cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup chopped mixed fresh fragrant herbs (see recipe introduction)


Lightly beat the eggs in a bowl until blended. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
Warm the olive oil in a medium-sized sauté pan over medium heat. Add the green garlic and sauté until soft, 3 to 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, add the asparagus and herbs, and stir for 2 minutes. Add the beaten eggs and mix well. Raise the heat to medium and cook, without stirring, until the omelet is set and golden on the bottom but the top is still runny, 8 to 10 minutes. While the omelet cooks, run a spatula around the edge of the pan a few times, to prevent sticking.
Invert a plate on top of the pan, then carefully invert the pan and plate together. Lift off the pan and slide the omelet, browned side up, back into the pan. Cook the second side over medium heat until pale gold, about 3 minutes longer. Do not overcook, as you don't want the eggs to be dry. (Alternatively, use a flameproof sauté pan and slip the omelet under a preheated broiler to brown the top.)
Slide the omelet onto a serving plate, let it cool for a bit, and then cut into wedges to serve.


MATCHING POINTER: Eggs and wine are a difficult match. A white wine with some sharpacidity is the conventional solution to overcome the egg, but a medium-bodied and slightly herbalred wine is a successful departure. * ITALIAN WINES: BREGANZE ROSSO, MERLOT (VENETO) *ALTERNATIVE WINES: MERLOT (SOUTHWEST FRANCE, WASHINGTON STATE, NEW ZEALAND),CABERNET FRANC (LOIRE VALLEY CHINON OR BOURGEUIL)


From Pastas and Grains


* * *


Tre salse per pasta

THREE SAUCES FOR PASTA


Tomato sauce is ubiquitous in the Italian kitchen. It may be used for lasagna, to spoon on pasta rolls or cannelloni, or to toss with the pasta of your choice. The olive oil or butterenrichment gives the sauce a smoother finish in the mouth. If the tomatoes are tart, add a pinchof sugar for balance. Both keep for 4 to 5 days in the refrigerator. Besciamella, the classic cream sauce, is a rich enhancement for pasta al forno.


All sauces make about 3 cups


* * *


Salsa di pomodoro ricca

RICH TOMATO SAUCE


3 tablespoons olive oil
1 carrot, peeled and chopped
1 celery stalk, chopped
1/2 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
5 large fresh basil leaves, chopped
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 can (28 ounces) plum tomatoes, with their juices, coarsely chopped


Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, parsley, and basil and stir well. Season with salt and pepper and sauté until the vegetables are pale gold, about 10 minutes. Add the wine and cook until it evaporates, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes with their juices, stir well, reduce the heat to low, and simmer gently, uncovered, until thickened, about 1 hour. Remove from the heat and pass through a food mill if you want a smoother texture.


* * *


Salsa di Pomodoro

TOMATO SAUCE


1 can (28 ounces) plum tomatoes, with their juices
1/2 cup tomato purée
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces (optional)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (optional)
Pinch of sugar
6 fresh basil leaves, chopped (optional)
1/2 cup to 3/4 cup heavy cream (optional)


Place the tomatoes and their juices in a food processor and process until finely chopped but not liquefied. Transfer to a heavy saucepan. Stir in the tomato purée and place over low heat. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring often, until the sauce is slightly thickened, about 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. If desired, stir in the butter or olive oil for a smoother finish, and the sugar or basil if needed to balance the flavors. For a richer, sweeter, thinner sauce, stir in the cream.


* * *


Salsa besciamella tradizionale

CLASSIC CREAM SAUCE


1/4 cup unsalted butter
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 cups milk or light cream, heated
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Freshly grated nutmeg


Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour and cook, stirring, until it is well incorporated, about 3 minutes. Slowly stir in the hot milk or cream and cook, stirring often, until quite thick and the flour has lost all of its raw taste, about 8 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg and remove from the heat.


meatballs, combine the meat, bread crumbs, cheese, parsley, and garlic in a bowl. Mix in 1 egg. If the mixture seems dry, add the second egg. Season with salt and pepper. Fry a nugget of the mixture to test the seasoning. When you are happy with the flavors, form the mixture into walnut-sized balls.

Pour olive oil to the depth of 1/4 inch into a large sauté pan and place over high heat. When the oil is hot, add the meatballs and fry, turning as necessary, until golden on the outside. If you are serving them plain, continue frying them until cooked through, about 10 minutes, then turn out onto a plate. If you are combining them with the greens, remove from the heat.
If serving with greens, rinse the greens well, then place in a large sauté pan with only the rinsing water clinging to the leaves. Place over medium heat and cook, turning as needed, until wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a colander and drain well, pressing with the back of a spoon. Chop coarsely, squeeze dry, and set aside.
Warm the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until tender, about 10 minutes. Add the Tomato Sauce, stock, and lemon zest and bring to a simmer. Add the browned meatballs and simmer for several minutes until cooked through. Add the cooked greens and simmer for a minute or two longer until heated through. Taste and adjust the seasoning, then serve hot or warm.


MATCHING POINTER: Medium-bodied red wines with a trace of earth and adequate tannins (to balancethe bitterness from the greens) are a good match. * ITALIAN WINES: ROSSO CONERO,NEBBIOLO D'ALBA * ALTERNATIVE WINES: GRENACHE BLENDS (SOUTHERN FRANCE, NORTHAFRICA, SPAIN), PINOT NOIR (CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL COAST, URGUNDY)


Excerpted from ENOTECA by JOYCE GOLDSTEIN. Copyright © 2001 by Joyce Goldstein. Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.


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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION: EVOLUTION OF THE ENOTECA 9
ORIGIN OF THE RECIPES 14
EVAN GOLDSTEIN'S INTRODUCTION TO THE WINE NOTES 17
Piccoli piatti fritti: FRITTERS AND FRITTATAS 19
Torte salate, focaccia, e crostini: SAVORY PASTRIES AND BREADS 39
Pasta al forno: PASTAS AND GRAINS 63
Pesce e frutti di mare: FISH AND SHELLFISH 87
Carne e pollame: MEAT AND POULTRY 111
Verdure: VEGETABLES 141
Formaggi e condimenti e confetture per formaggi: CHEESES,
CONDIMENTS, AND PRESERVES 157
Dolci: SWEETS 177
BIBLIOGRAPHY 188
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 189
INDEX 190
TABLE OF EQUIVALENTS 196
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