Enriching Curriculum for All Students / Edition 2
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Enriching Curriculum for All Students / Edition 2

by Joseph S. Renzulli
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1412953804

ISBN-13: 9781412953801

Pub. Date: 10/24/2007

Publisher: SAGE Publications

Use the Schoolwide Enrichment Model to support enriching learning opportunities for all learners and to develop students' talent, raise achievement, honor diversity, and foster a growth-oriented staff.

Overview

Use the Schoolwide Enrichment Model to support enriching learning opportunities for all learners and to develop students' talent, raise achievement, honor diversity, and foster a growth-oriented staff.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781412953801
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Publication date:
10/24/2007
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
1,248,550
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     ix
About the Authors     xi
What Is "Enrichment" and Why Is It Important in Developing Curriculum in America's Schools?     1
The "Why" Question     1
The "What" Question     4
What Exactly Is Enrichment Learning and Teaching?     5
The Teacher as Guide on the Side     6
The Goals of Schoolwide Enrichment     7
Using the Schoolwide Enrichment Model to Enrich Curriculum for All Students     13
Expanding Conceptions of Gifts and Talents: The Theory Underlying the SEM     15
Two Kinds of Giftedness     15
An Overview of the Enrichment Triad Model     18
The Revolving Door Identification Model: Identifying Students for the SEM     21
The SEM     22
The Regular Curriculum     23
The Enrichment Clusters     23
The Continuum of Special Services     25
The Service Delivery Components     27
Nonnegotiables About Implementing Enrichment in the SEM     31
Research on the SEM     33
Summary     34
Challenging All Students With a Continuum of Enrichment Services     35
Background to the Establishment of a Continuum of Services     36
Theoretical andOrganizational Models     38
An Integrated Continuum of Special Services     39
How and When Enrichment Activities Take Place     42
Keys to Developing a Comprehensive Continuum of Services     43
Organizing Services in the Continuum     44
The Role of Grouping and Tracking in a Continuum of Services     44
The Politics of Grouping     45
Nongraded Instructional Grouping and Within-Classroom Cluster Grouping     46
Managing Within-Classroom Cluster Groups     48
Concluding Thoughts on Grouping     50
Establishing a Continuum of Services in School-Based or District-Level Enrichment Programs: Getting Started     51
Other Enrichment Options     52
Developing Talent Portfolios for All Students     55
What Is the Total Talent Portfolio?     56
Status and Action Information     56
Focus on Strengths     61
Portfolio Engineering: Creating a Total Talent Portfolio     61
Gathering and Recording Information About Abilities     61
Gathering and Recording Information About Student Interests     64
Instructional Styles Preferences     68
Learning Environment Preferences     71
Benefits of the Total Talent Portfolio      72
Curriculum Compacting and Differentiation     75
Curriculum Compacting: Definitions and Steps for Implementation     76
Defining Curriculum Compacting     77
How to Use the Compacting Process     78
Providing Acceleration and Enrichment Options for Talented Students     79
Rose: A Sample Compactor Form     80
Providing Support for Teachers to Implement Compacting     81
Examining Curriculum Alternatives     86
Enrichment Materials in the Classroom     87
Assessing Students' Interests     87
Interest Centers     88
Research on Curriculum Compacting     88
Advice From Successful Teachers Who Have Implemented Compacting     90
Summary     90
The Multiple Menu Model: A Guide to In-Depth Learning and Teaching     91
Enrichment Learning and Teaching: The Enrichment Triad Model     103
An Overview of the Enrichment Triad Model and Examples of Type III Student Creative Productivity     104
Learning in a Natural Way     105
The Importance of Interaction     105
Type I Enrichment: General Exploratory Experiences     106
Type II Enrichment: Group Training Activities     108
Type III Enrichment: Individual and Small-Group Investigations of Real Problems     112
Applying the Enrichment Triad Model to Enrichment Clusters     121
How Can Teachers Learn to Use Enrichment Teaching?     127
Applying the Type III Process to Enrichment Clusters     128
Applying the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) to Content Areas: The SEM in Reading     131
Hooking Kids on Literature With Teacher Read-Alouds     133
Supported Independent Reading and Differentiated Conferences     134
Interest and Choice Activities     135
Research on the SEM-R     136
A Dozen Assistants in Your Classroom: Implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model by Using a New Online Resource for Enrichment and Differentiation     137
Strength Assessment Using the Electronic Learning Profile (the Total Talent Portfolio Online)     138
Enrichment Differentiation Databases     139
The Wizard Project Maker     142
The Total Talent Portfolio     142
Renzulli Learning System     143
The Value-Added Benefits of Learning With Technology     145
RL Conclusions     146
Appendix A     149
Appendix B     157
References     163
Index     169

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