Entanglement

( 4 )

Overview

Praise for Entanglement:

“An exquisite contemporary crime story. Polish literature boasts a real master.”—Jerzy Pilch, author of The Mighty Angel

“A tightly plotted mystery novel, dark humor and contemporary Warsaw perfectly rendered.”—Przekrój Magazine

The morning after a group psychotherapy session in a Warsaw monastery, Henry Talek is found dead, a roasting spit stuck in ...

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Entanglement

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Overview

Praise for Entanglement:

“An exquisite contemporary crime story. Polish literature boasts a real master.”—Jerzy Pilch, author of The Mighty Angel

“A tightly plotted mystery novel, dark humor and contemporary Warsaw perfectly rendered.”—Przekrój Magazine

The morning after a group psychotherapy session in a Warsaw monastery, Henry Talek is found dead, a roasting spit stuck in one eye.

Public prosecutor Teodor Szacki, world-weary, suffering from bureaucratic exhaustion and marital ennui, feels that life has passed him by. But this case changes everything. Because of it he meets Monika Grzelka, a young journalist whose charms prove difficult to resist, and he discovers the frightening power of certain esoteric therapeutic methods. The shocking videos of the sessions lead him to an array of possible scenarios. Could one of the patients have become so absorbed by his therapy role-playing that he murdered Telak? Szacki’s investigation leads him to an earlier murder, before the fall of Communism.

And why is the Secret Police suddenly taking an interest in all this? As Szacki uncovers each piece of the puzzle, facts emerge that he’d be better off not knowing, for his own safety.

Zygmunt Miloszewski, born in Warsaw in 1975, is an editor currently working for Newsweek. His first novel, The Intercom, was published in 2005 to high acclaim. Entanglement followed in 2007, and the author is now working on screenplays based on The Intercom and Entanglement as well as on a sequel to the latter, also featuring Teodor Szacki.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Miloszewski takes an engaging look at modern Polish society in this stellar first in a new series starring Warsaw prosecutor Teodor Szacki. Analyst Cezary Rudzki, the leader of a group therapy session, uses the innovative Family Constellation approach, in which each person pretends to be a relative of each other participant. When one of the four members of the group, Henryk Telak, turns up dead with a skewer through his eye, Szacki investigates. The victim's tragic circumstances--one child a suicide, another terminally ill--suggest to Szacki that a fellow patient got too absorbed in the role-playing and committed the murder as an expression of rage on the part of someone close to Telak. Szacki, who's undergoing a midlife crisis and has ambivalent feelings about his wife, considers an affair with a journalist hoping to get exclusive details on his inquiry. Readers will want to see more of the complex, sympathetic Szacki. (Aug.)
From the Publisher

"This is a carefully plotted story that continues to engage the reader from the opening sentence to the final scene. The author provides a rich sense of place, interesting characters, and a view of life in contemporary Warsaw."—ILOVEAMYSTERY.com
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Product Details

Meet the Author


Born in Warsaw in 1975, Miloszewski is a reporter and editor currently working for Newsweek. His first novel, 'The Intercom', was published in 2005 to high acclaim. In 2006 he published his novel for young readers, 'The Adder Mountains', and in 2007 a crime novel 'Entanglement'. A sequel to the latter is under way. Antonia Lloyd-Jones is well known for her translations from the Polish of novels by Pawel Huelle such as Mercedes-Benz (shortlisted for The Independent Foreign Fiction Award 2006) and Castorp (shortlisted for The Independent Foreign Fiction Award 2007). Other authors she has translated include Ryszard Kapuscinski and Olga Tokarczuk.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    This is a fascinating Polish police procedural

    In 2005 at a Warsaw monastery, a demanding group therapy session occurs hosted by Cezary Rudski. He tells a tale to the three of his four patents (Euzebiusz Kiam, Hanna Kwiatkowska and Barbara Jarczyk) who remain at the table; Henryk Talek is not there as the therapist assumes he left unable to cope with the intensity.

    The next day Henryk is found dead; a roasting spit jammed into his eye. Warsaw prosecutor Teodor Szack leads the investigation, but has no energy for the case. He is bone wearily tired as he interviews the therapist and the three surviving patients. However, he soon finds his inquiry intriguing as he uncovers a link to a cold case homicide over two decades ago when the Communists ran roughshod. Adding to his renewed vigor is meeting enthusiastic reporter Monika Grzelka whose beauty and élan revitalizes him. However, Szack also wonders why the Secret Police are following his every move.

    This is a fascinating Polish police procedural in which almost two decades since the fall of the Iron Curtain mysteries remain tied to the Communist era. The investigation is cleverly devised and the ennui Szarck feels at first is powerful as is his sudden zest for life after meeting the energetic journalist. However, the key to Zygmunt Miloszewski's engaging whodunit is Warsaw as the city comes across modern yet retains the scars of communism.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 30, 2013

    Check it out!

    I was attracted to the Polish author writing about modern day Poland. Although the book is in the murder mystery genre, I found that perspective all the more fascinating. The characters are well fleshed out and complicated, plot is intriguing, and the setting is descriptive enough for a great story. The Polish spelling of names cause a bit of complication, but a pleasant challenge. I also bought the follow up novel, as this is well written, for a genre I'm not generally attracted to. A worthwhile read in paperback, hope not too much of the culture was lost in translation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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