Enter the New Negroes: Images of Race in American Culture

Overview

"With the appearance of the urban, modern, diverse "New Negroes" in the Harlem Renaissance, writers and critics began a vibrant debate on the nature of African-American identity, community, and history. Martha Jane Nadell offers an illuminating new perspective on the period and the decades immediately following it in an exploration of the neglected role played by visual images of race in that debate." Featuring many compelling contemporary illustrations, Enter the New Negroes restores a critical visual aspect to African-American culture as it
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Overview

"With the appearance of the urban, modern, diverse "New Negroes" in the Harlem Renaissance, writers and critics began a vibrant debate on the nature of African-American identity, community, and history. Martha Jane Nadell offers an illuminating new perspective on the period and the decades immediately following it in an exploration of the neglected role played by visual images of race in that debate." Featuring many compelling contemporary illustrations, Enter the New Negroes restores a critical visual aspect to African-American culture as it evokes the passion of a community determined to shape its own identity and image.
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Editorial Reviews

Journal of American Studies
Martha Jane Nadell brings a fresh approach to the study of "the New Negro." Nadell's account explores the debate among African American artists about African American identity: what or who were the New Negroes, and how best to represent them?...Nadell should be applauded for her skilful handling of both visual and textual representations and for raising important, but hitherto neglected, questions about how these two forms interact, in a way that must change the way in which we read familiar texts.

— Kate Dossett

Library Journal
Nadell (English, Brooklyn Coll., CUNY) analyzes how African Americans were characterized in literature in the early 1920s: men as Uncle Toms or Sambos and women as Mammies or Jezebels. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Journal of American Studies
Martha Jane Nadell brings a fresh approach to the study of "the New Negro." Nadell's account explores the debate among African American artists about African American identity: what or who were the New Negroes, and how best to represent them?...Nadell should be applauded for her skilful handling of both visual and textual representations and for raising important, but hitherto neglected, questions about how these two forms interact, in a way that must change the way in which we read familiar texts.
From the Publisher
A brilliant, pioneering work that cuts across genres with great intellectual agility and superb scholarly complexity.

Enter the New Negroes is ambitious, vibrant, and original. To my knowledge there is no other work that explores the relationship between the visual and textual elements discussed here. The book is a unique contribution to African-American studies, American literature and art history. It provides detailed and creative readings of image and text as well as the relationship between them. Nadell's most important contribution is her discussion of the collaboration between writers and visual artists who together helped to create "the New Negro."

An impressive, at times brilliant, analysis of the relationship between visual images and black literature. Nadell brings new insights to the discussion of black culture and finds new and provocative messages in the texts she examines. This important work is a major contribution to American literary and visual arts history.

In exploring the relation between both literary and visual works and the artists who produced them, Martha Nadell offers a novel approach to a well-worn subject in a major contribution to our understanding of modernism and African-American literature. She brilliantly links an interpretation of word and image with an exceptional sense of historical trajectory. Enter the New Negroes establishes Nadell as an important and original scholar.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674015111
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Martha Jane Nadell is Assistant Professor of English at Brooklyn College, CUNY.
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Table of Contents

Introduction

1. Exit the Old Negro

2. Enter the New Negro

3. Fy-ah

4. Them Big Old Lies

5. Realistic Tongues

6. Silhouettes

Epilogue: Newer Negroes

Notes

Index

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