Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)

Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)

4.8 7
by Wu-Tang Clan
     
 

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Ego is in no short supply in the entertainment industry, but it's rare to appoint yourself a supergroup from the start -- as the Staten Island's Wu-Tang Clan did -- and then back it up. This 1993 recording at first seemed to simply signal a resurgence in East Coast hip-hop, but it proved much more than that. RZA's distinctive production style

Overview

Ego is in no short supply in the entertainment industry, but it's rare to appoint yourself a supergroup from the start -- as the Staten Island's Wu-Tang Clan did -- and then back it up. This 1993 recording at first seemed to simply signal a resurgence in East Coast hip-hop, but it proved much more than that. RZA's distinctive production style featured whimsical funk loops and excerpts from martial arts and action-adventure movies. His eight -- yes eight -- frontmen, provided crisp and singular rhyme styles. As per the group's business plan, most of the group's rappers like Method Man, Ol' Dirty Bastard, Raekwon, Genius and Ghost Face Killah have gone on to release successful solo recordings. In addition, many rappers have released recordings as satellite members of the group.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Steve Huey
Along with Dr. Dre's The Chronic, the Wu-Tang Clan's debut, Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), was one of the most influential rap albums of the '90s. Its spare yet atmospheric production -- courtesy of RZA -- mapped out the sonic blueprint that countless other hardcore rappers would follow for years to come. It laid the groundwork for the rebirth of New York hip-hop in the hardcore age, paving the way for everybody from Biggie and Jay-Z to Nas and Mobb Deep. Moreover, it introduced a colorful cast of hugely talented MCs, some of whom ranked among the best and most unique individual rappers of the decade. Some were outsized, theatrical personalities, others were cerebral storytellers and lyrical technicians, but each had his own distinctive style, which made for an album of tremendous variety and consistency. Every track on Enter the Wu-Tang is packed with fresh, inventive rhymes, which are filled with martial arts metaphors, pop culture references (everything from Voltron to Lucky Charms cereal commercials to Barbra Streisand's "The Way We Were"), bizarre threats of violence, and a truly twisted sense of humor. Their off-kilter menace is really brought to life, however, by the eerie, lo-fi production, which helped bring the raw sound of the underground into mainstream hip-hop. Starting with a foundation of hard, gritty beats and dialogue samples from kung fu movies, RZA kept things minimalistic, but added just enough minor-key piano, strings, or muted horns to create a background ambience that works like the soundtrack to a surreal nightmare. There was nothing like it in the hip-hop world at the time, and even after years of imitation, Enter the Wu-Tang still sounds fresh and original. Subsequent group and solo projects would refine and deepen this template, but collectively, the Wu have never been quite this tight again.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/09/1993
Label:
Rca
UPC:
0078636633626
catalogNumber:
66336
Rank:
20711

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Wu-Tang Clan   Primary Artist
Ol' Dirty Bastard   Vocals
Method Man   Vocals
Raekwon   Vocals
Fourth Disciple   scratching
U-God   Vocals

Technical Credits

GZA/Genius   Contributor
Ol' Dirty Bastard   Producer
Method Man   Producer
Wu-Tang Clan   Composer
Prince Rakeem   Arranger,Programming,Producer
Carlos Bess   Engineer
Jacqueline Murphy   Artwork,Art Direction
Ghostface Killah   Contributor
Dennis Coles   Executive Producer
Robert Diggs   Executive Producer
Mitchell Diggs   Executive Producer
Oli Grant   Executive Producer
Tracey Waples   Executive Producer
Ethan Ryman   Engineer
Shallah Raekwon   Contributor

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Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this is the BEST rap album ever! RZA's production cannot be beat! all members of the group bring something different to the table, which means this album never gets boring. the lyrics are off the chain! my favorites include "bring da ruckus", "da mystery of chessboxin'", and "c.r.e.a.m.". wu-tang clan comin' at cha!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ok, i'll start by explaining why i have only given this album a 4star when every true hip hop is raving about the talent of the clan and how exellent this allbum is, ye! i agree this is a good album but i think the Wu's first installment is extremely overrated, The RZA kicks a** with the beats and production and the whole albums contains that good old sounding hip hop that seems like it can only be produced these days by the Wu, but i find it quite a booring album once listened to a few times. To me this isnt one of those albums that often sees the optics of my Cd player, its a massive break through in rap which is why ive rated it high and its a got a couple of tracks that realy light up your eyes, my favourite is chessboxin, thats a deadly raw track thats deserves a lot of play but the rest of the album isnt good a enough to make me wanna get it out for that one track. This is undoubtly a classic album and was one of faves but i dont think it deserves all the hype it receives and the only way to find out the truth is to purchase it, but i prefer the Wu's later work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There have been many great rap groups, but the wu-tang clan has been dope for a long time! I think 36 chambers is there most greatest album. Its a really old album, yet it is still making tons of money today. If you are a wu-tanger and you dont have this album yet, get it. Its bangin! take it from a hip-hop expert, Auxillary Preist.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album changed RAP. A Classic - Period. Remember the Protect ya Neck video: black & white, camcordrer, dark, ghostface still had his face covered..........damn, i can't believe that it was all so simple!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Any true hip-hop fan has this cd, or has at least heard of it. Prince Rakim is a master and method man, ol' dirty bastar* (they dont let me type it in on this website), U-God, and Rakewon are sick. Pick this up as soon as possible.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the greatest hip-hop album ever. RZA's production I think lays the most solid foundation on a rap cd ever, and the lyricists all get their time to shine. Don't miss this one if you're a wu fan or just a general rap fan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago