Entering the Picture: Judy Chicago, The Fresno Feminist Art Program, and the Collective Visions of Women Artists

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Overview

The Feminist Art Program that was set up by Judy Chicago at CSU Fresno in 1970 was arguably the most important event giving rise to the Feminist Art Movement in the United States. Those first fifteen students left that program and went on to influence American art in cities across the country. Entering the Picture explores and critically appraises the first four decades of the feminist art movement, from its foundational moments in Fresno, to Los Angeles and New York, including subsequent feminist art ...

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Entering the Picture: Judy Chicago, The Fresno Feminist Art Program, and the Collective Visions of Women Artists

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Overview

The Feminist Art Program that was set up by Judy Chicago at CSU Fresno in 1970 was arguably the most important event giving rise to the Feminist Art Movement in the United States. Those first fifteen students left that program and went on to influence American art in cities across the country. Entering the Picture explores and critically appraises the first four decades of the feminist art movement, from its foundational moments in Fresno, to Los Angeles and New York, including subsequent feminist art institutions and collaborative projects created in these cities and beyond. This interdisciplinary collection of both previously published and original essays by established and emerging feminist artists, art historians, and cultural studies experts provides a historical and theoretical context for the work of these women, and together, these essays offer points of connection that develop narrative linkages and conceptual frameworks for understanding what happened in the art world in the 1970s. The book includes a color insert, paid for by a grant from CSU Fresno, which showcases the work of these artists, both past and present.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'Witness the excitement of women who believe CHANGE IS POSSIBLE AND WE CAN MAKE IT HAPPEN. Detailed insights and histories from pioneers and custodians of the feminist art movement read like a pilgrimage and a call: Activism on behalf of women!'
–Joanna Frueh, author of Clairvoyance (For Those in the Desert): Performance Pieces, 1979-2004

'Jill Fields’study is an important contribution to the cultural history of feminist art and a collective story of one of its origins at the Feminist Art Program in Fresno, California. The essays by artists and scholars explore interconnections between that locus of activity and feminist strategies nationally and internationally. Entering the Picture establishes a crucial foundation for the aesthetics and ethics of the early feminist movement, based on its magnificent ideas of liberation, exploration, and justice.'
–Andrea Liss, Professor of Contemporary Art History and Cultural Theory, California State University San Marcos

'Fields' book, like Chicago's feminist education work that inspired it, continues the rewriting of art history to increase the inclusion of women and people of color. Her cogent introduction contextualizes the 22 essays that range from personal accounts of participation in the key developments of Feminist Art to manifestoes for the continuation of feminist activism.'
– Betty Ann Brown, Artillery

'What makes the volume different from existing literature about feminist art movements in the US is its advocacy for, and insistent attention to, collective projects, voices and visions, without diminishing the role of individuals. ... Anyone with an interest in the cultural history of the women’s movement in the US, feminist art and feminist pedagogies will find Entering the Picture a rich resource. The numerous essays with interconnected topics and trajectories provide the reader with the possibility of exploring issues in detail. It is likely to be a stimulating read for artists, art historians and scholars interested in the feminist art movement in the US and their collective cultural histories.'
– Annette Krauss, European Journal of Women's Studies

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415887694
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 10/5/2011
  • Series: New Directions in American History Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 1,169,837
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Jill Fields is Professor of History at California State University, Fresno. She is the author of An Intimate Affair: Women, Lingerie, and Sexuality.

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Table of Contents

Jill Fields, Introduction

Section I: Emerging—Views from the Periphery

1. Gail Levin, Feminist Class, edited by Melissa Morris

2. Laura Meyer and Faith Wilding, Collaboration and Conflict in the Fresno Feminist Art Program: An Experiment in Feminist Pedagogy

3. Nancy Youdelman and Karen LeCocq, Reflections on the First Feminist Art Program

4. Moira Roth, Interview with Suzanne Lacy, edited by Laura Meyer

5. Paula Harper,The First Feminist Art Program: A View from the 1980s

6. Judy Chicago, Feminist Art Education: Made in California

Section II: Re-Centering—Theory and Practice

7. Valerie Smith, Abundant Evidence: Black Women Artists of the 1960s and 1970s

8. Jennie Klein, 'Teaching to Transgress:’ Rita Yokoi and the Fresno Feminist Art Program

9. Lillian Faderman, Joyce Aiken: Thirty Years of Feminist Art and Pedagogy in Fresno

10. Phranc, "Your Vagina Smells Fine Now Naturally"

11. Terezita Romo, Collective History: Las Mujeres Muralistas

12. Joanna Gardner-Huggett, The Woman's Art Cooperative Space as a Site for Social Change: Artemisia Gallery, Chicago (1973-1979)

13. Gloria Orenstein, Salon Women of the Second Wave: Honoring the Great Matrilineage of Creators of Culture

14. Katie Cercone, The New York Feminist Art Institute, 1979-1990

15. Nancy Azara and Darla Bjork, Our Journey to the New York Feminist Art Institute

Section III: Picturing: Transformation

16. Sylvia Savala, How I Became a Chicana Feminist Artist

17. Lydia Nakashima Degarrod, Searching for Catalyst and Empowerment: The Asian American Women Artists Association, 1989-Present

18. Miriam Schaer, Notes of a Dubious Daughter: My Unfinished Journey Towards Feminism

19. Tressa Berman and Nancy Mithlo, 'The Way Things Are:’ Curating Place as Feminist Practice in American Indian Women’s Art"

20. Ying-Ying Chien, Marginal Discourse and Pacific Rim Women's Art

21. Jo Anna Isaak, Gaia Cianfanelli and Caterina Iaquinta, Curatorial Practice as Collaboration in the U.S. and Italy

22. Beverly Naidus, Feminist Activist Art Pedagogy

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2014

    Worst written book ever!!

    Worst written book ever!!

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