Enterprise Development with Visual Studio .NET, UML, and MSF / Edition 1

Enterprise Development with Visual Studio .NET, UML, and MSF / Edition 1

4.0 1
by John Erik Hansen, Carsten Thomsen, John Hansen
     
 

ISBN-10: 1590590422

ISBN-13: 9781590590423

Pub. Date: 05/20/2004

Publisher: Apress

Using Visual Studio .NET (VS .NET) for creating enterprise solutions, authors John Hansen and Carsten Thomsen have chosen to add the Unified Modeling Language (UML), for designing and documenting solutions, and the Microsoft Solutions Framework (MSF), for planning and managing projects.

Experienced developers, team leaders,

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Overview

Using Visual Studio .NET (VS .NET) for creating enterprise solutions, authors John Hansen and Carsten Thomsen have chosen to add the Unified Modeling Language (UML), for designing and documenting solutions, and the Microsoft Solutions Framework (MSF), for planning and managing projects.

Experienced developers, team leaders, and project managers who need a structured way of creating enterprise solutions will benefit from reading this book. Parts of this book can be used by developers (experienced or not) and managers who want to know about MSF and UML in connection with .NET development.

This guide provides an enterprise development overview, an in-depth introduction to UML, and coverage of various enterprise tools included with the VS .NET Enterprise Developer (VSED) and VS .NET Enterprise Architect (VSEA) editions, such as enterprise template projects, Visual SourceSafe (VSS), Visio for Enterprise Architects 2003 (VEA), Microsoft Application Center Test (ACT), and Visual Studio Analyzer.

Not only will you learn how to deploy your project, but also two hands-on chapters will show you how to analyze your project and model it using VEA, and guide you step-by-step through the process.

For most readers, this is a cover-to-cover book, but it can certainly be used as a reference guide whenever you need information about a particular tool or process. Throughout this book, youll find exercises that demonstrate the topic being discussed, making this book a must-have for programmers dealing with, or those with an interest in, developing enterprise .NET solutions.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590590423
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
05/20/2004
Edition description:
1st Corrected ed. 2004. Corr. 3rd printing 2004
Pages:
984
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.94(d)

Table of Contents

Ch. 1Getting started : a modeling primer3
Ch. 2Planning and documenting your solution41
Ch. 3Getting to know the Unified Modeling Language85
Ch. 4Examining the UML models : behavioral models105
Ch. 5Examining the UML models : static models153
Ch. 6Planning a VB .NET or C# project213
Ch. 7Maintaining the UML documentation235
Ch. 8Using Enterprise template projects249
Ch. 9Using policy files293
Ch. 10Using custom help topics383
Ch. 11Visual SourceSafe423
Ch. 12Visio for Enterprise Architects 2003499
Ch. 13Application center test537
Ch. 14Visual Studio Analyzer565
Ch. 15Deploying your applications585
Ch. 16Hands on : an internal project665
Ch. 17Hands on : an external project739
Ch. 18IBM Rational XDE791
Ch. 19Comparing Microsoft and IBM Rational UML tools and development frameworks813
Ch. 20Microsoft Solutions Framework 3.0833

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Enterprise Development with Visual Studio .NET, UML, and MSF 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For developers on a Microsoft platform, Microsoft has offered Visual Studio as its flagship development environment. A very sophisticated package. Naturally, as .NET was fleshed out, VS has been upgraded to help you program in that framework. The authors accordingly go into reams of detail, with numerous screen captures, showing what VS.NET can do for you. They also cover how VS can be integrated with UML. So that, as a very nifty feature, VS can autogenerate code given as input a set of UML diagrams. To some of you, it will be a big timesaver, and it lets you concentrate on writing the key parts of your code, not boilerplate. Of course, different developers will have different needs, but clearly some of you will appreciate this UML ability. The authors also talk about using Microsoft Solutions Framework as a project design framework. Much here is not instrinsically tied to .NET or even Microsoft. This part of the book has a lot of high level jargon. The ideas seem clear enough. But so does a lot of other ideas about project design and management. There is a big impedance mismatch between this chapter and the rest of the book. Perhaps the chapter could have been expanded into a book of its own?