Enterprise Networking / Edition 1

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Overview

This book will look at enterprise networking from the perspective of network use and applications developers. It describes the application services provided by the network and the technologies to implement end-to-end communication between users; it will present the fundamentals of a networking environment, and the services they provide. It will also cover networking technologies such as TCPIP Novell Netware, DECnet, etc.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Provides a thorough discussion of networking technology in six parts, covering the fundamentals; enterprise network services; the transport network; data link subnetworks; network interconnection; and appendices including standards organizations, the OSI reference model, the IEEE/ISO/ANSI LAN architecture, and a glossary. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780133051865
  • Publisher: Pearson Technology Group 2
  • Publication date: 1/1/1996
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 516
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Read an Excerpt

In the past, mainframes and minicomputers, with their attached terminals, formed the basis of most forms of corporate network computing. Since the early 1980s, individual workgroups in organizations have begun to use local area networks (LANs) as a way of sharing resources. Workgroup LANs administered by individual departments often coexist with the corporate networks administered by the central information systems organization. In many cases, individual departmental LANs have been interconnected to form extended networks that reach throughout the organization. These interconnected departmental networks often have the same scope as the corporate networks.

The traditional large information systems vendors, such as IBM and Digital, have been changing their networking products to better serve the needs of individual desktop users. At the same time, the vendors in the workgroup computing arena, such as Microsoft and Novell, have been expanding their products to better serve the needs of enterprise-wide computing. The term enterprise networking refers to a form of integrated networking that attempts to integrate the large wide area networks that have been constructed by information systems organizations with the local area networks that have been created by users in individual workgroups.

The goal of enterprise networking is to enable enterprise computing, where users throughout an organization are able to communicate with each other and to access data, processing services, applications, and other resources without regard to where they are located. The challenge for enterprise networking is to provide the organization with networking facilities that meet the needs of enterprise computing at reasonable cost. Compatibility is a key issue in providing connectivity between all users and resources on the enterprise network while keeping costs reasonable in the enterprise computing environment.

To facilitate compatibility, standards organizations and hardware and software vendors have cooperated to develop architectures for enterprise networking that allow products from different vendors to interoperate. A number of important architectures and technologies used in enterprise networking are described in this book.

The subject of enterprise networking can be approached in a number of different ways. A high-level perspective takes the view of network users and application developers. With this perspective, it is important to describe the application services the network provides and the technologies employed to implement end-to-end communication between users. This book looks at enterprise networks from this high-level perspective.

Another important aspect of enterprise networking-especially to those who implement the network-concerns the technologies used for moving data over the individual physical connections that make up the network. A companion book to this one, Enterprise Networking: Data Link Subnetworks, concentrates on the lower-level subnetwork technologies. A third book, Local Area Networks: Architectures and Implementations, looks at data link technology for local area networks in even more detail.

Plan of the Book

The chapters of this book are divided into five parts. Part I introduces the enterprise networking environment. The chapters in Part I describe the characteristics of enterprise networks, introduce the various network architectures on which enterprise networking hardware and software products are based, and present an architectural model for enterprise networks.

Part II discusses the various types of services that enterprise networks provide for end users and for application programs. The chapters in Part II discuss general application services, naming and directory services, network management services, and the services provided by the Open Software Foundation Distributed Computing Environment (OSF DCE)

Part III describes the enterprise networking technologies used to transport user data, on an end-to-end basis, from a source machine to a destination machine. The chapters in Part III introduce the characteristics of the transport network, describe the various types of data transport facilities used in enterprise networks-including TCP/IP, Novell NetWare, NetBIOS, AppleTalk, SNA, and DECnet-and examine application programming interfaces provided by Transport network technology.

Part IV introduces the characteristics of data link subnetwork technologies used to build enterprise networks. The chapters in Part IV introduce the types of services provided by an individual data link in an enterprise network and describe network driver software used to interface with subnetworks.

Part V examines the technologies used for interconnecting user machines and data links to form integrated enterprise networks. The chapters in Part V introduce strategies for network interconnection, describe specific technologies for implementing interconnections-including repeaters, hubs, bridges, routers, gateways, and encapsulation facilities-and examine strategies useful for implementing networks that handle multiple transport protocol families.

Intended Readers

This book is intended for a broad range of readers, including the following:

Information systems and communications managers and technical staff members who maintain and administer computer networks and who need a thorough understanding of networking technology.

Information systems and communications technical staff members who select, install, and support network hardware and software products and who deal with the complexities of multi-vendor networking.

Users of network services who desire an understanding of the technology behind the computer communication tools used in their work environment.

Students who are studying computer communications technologies.

James Martin Kathleen Kavanagh Chapman Joe Leben

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Table of Contents

Preface
List of Acronyms
1 Enterprise Networks 1
2 Network Architectures 13
3 An Enterprise Network Model 25
4 Application Services 33
5 Directory Services 63
6 Network Management Services 91
7 OSF Distributed Computing Environment 117
8 The Transport Network 141
9 TCP/IP Transport 155
10 NetWare IPX/SPX Transport 179
11 NetBIOS Transport 195
12 AppleTalk Transport 203
13 SNA Subarea Network Transport 239
14 SNA APPN Transport 273
15 DECnet Transport 285
16 Transport Interfaces 315
17 Data Link Subnetworks 341
18 Network Driver Software 349
19 Network Interconnection Strategies 363
20 Bridges 373
21 Routers, Gateways, and Tunnels 385
22 Multiple-Protocol Networking Strategies 399
App. A Standards Organizations 423
App. B The OSI Reference Model 433
App. C The IEEE/ISO/ANSI LAN Architecture 445
App. D Glossary 451
Index 479
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Preface

In the past, mainframes and minicomputers, with their attached terminals, formed the basis of most forms of corporate network computing. Since the early 1980s, individual workgroups in organizations have begun to use local area networks (LANs) as a way of sharing resources. Workgroup LANs administered by individual departments often coexist with the corporate networks administered by the central information systems organization. In many cases, individual departmental LANs have been interconnected to form extended networks that reach throughout the organization. These interconnected departmental networks often have the same scope as the corporate networks.

The traditional large information systems vendors, such as IBM and Digital, have been changing their networking products to better serve the needs of individual desktop users. At the same time, the vendors in the workgroup computing arena, such as Microsoft and Novell, have been expanding their products to better serve the needs of enterprise-wide computing. The term enterprise networking refers to a form of integrated networking that attempts to integrate the large wide area networks that have been constructed by information systems organizations with the local area networks that have been created by users in individual workgroups.

The goal of enterprise networking is to enable enterprise computing, where users throughout an organization are able to communicate with each other and to access data, processing services, applications, and other resources without regard to where they are located. The challenge for enterprise networking is to provide the organization with networking facilities that meet the needs of enterprise computing at reasonable cost. Compatibility is a key issue in providing connectivity between all users and resources on the enterprise network while keeping costs reasonable in the enterprise computing environment.

To facilitate compatibility, standards organizations and hardware and software vendors have cooperated to develop architectures for enterprise networking that allow products from different vendors to interoperate. A number of important architectures and technologies used in enterprise networking are described in this book.

The subject of enterprise networking can be approached in a number of different ways. A high-level perspective takes the view of network users and application developers. With this perspective, it is important to describe the application services the network provides and the technologies employed to implement end-to-end communication between users. This book looks at enterprise networks from this high-level perspective.

Another important aspect of enterprise networking-especially to those who implement the network-concerns the technologies used for moving data over the individual physical connections that make up the network. A companion book to this one, Enterprise Networking: Data Link Subnetworks, concentrates on the lower-level subnetwork technologies. A third book, Local Area Networks: Architectures and Implementations, looks at data link technology for local area networks in even more detail.

Plan of the Book

The chapters of this book are divided into five parts. Part I introduces the enterprise networking environment. The chapters in Part I describe the characteristics of enterprise networks, introduce the various network architectures on which enterprise networking hardware and software products are based, and present an architectural model for enterprise networks.

Part II discusses the various types of services that enterprise networks provide for end users and for application programs. The chapters in Part II discuss general application services, naming and directory services, network management services, and the services provided by the Open Software Foundation Distributed Computing Environment (OSF DCE)

Part III describes the enterprise networking technologies used to transport user data, on an end-to-end basis, from a source machine to a destination machine. The chapters in Part III introduce the characteristics of the transport network, describe the various types of data transport facilities used in enterprise networks-including TCP/IP, Novell NetWare, NetBIOS, AppleTalk, SNA, and DECnet-and examine application programming interfaces provided by Transport network technology.

Part IV introduces the characteristics of data link subnetwork technologies used to build enterprise networks. The chapters in Part IV introduce the types of services provided by an individual data link in an enterprise network and describe network driver software used to interface with subnetworks.

Part V examines the technologies used for interconnecting user machines and data links to form integrated enterprise networks. The chapters in Part V introduce strategies for network interconnection, describe specific technologies for implementing interconnections-including repeaters, hubs, bridges, routers, gateways, and encapsulation facilities-and examine strategies useful for implementing networks that handle multiple transport protocol families.

Intended Readers

This book is intended for a broad range of readers, including the following:

Information systems and communications managers and technical staff members who maintain and administer computer networks and who need a thorough understanding of networking technology.

Information systems and communications technical staff members who select, install, and support network hardware and software products and who deal with the complexities of multi-vendor networking.

Users of network services who desire an understanding of the technology behind the computer communication tools used in their work environment.

Students who are studying computer communications technologies.

James Martin Kathleen Kavanagh Chapman Joe Leben

Read More Show Less

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