Enterprise to Endeavour: The J-Class Yachts

Enterprise to Endeavour: The J-Class Yachts

by Ian Dear, Aan Dear
     
 

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Only ten J-Class yachts were ever built and they raced for the America's Cup and other trophies in British and American Waters for a mere eight seasons between 1930 and 1937. There have been many yachts that have been larger, and still others that have been faster, but no one sailing class has ever gripped the imagination of the public at large as much as the Js did.…  See more details below

Overview

Only ten J-Class yachts were ever built and they raced for the America's Cup and other trophies in British and American Waters for a mere eight seasons between 1930 and 1937. There have been many yachts that have been larger, and still others that have been faster, but no one sailing class has ever gripped the imagination of the public at large as much as the Js did. They were unique for their combination of size and speed, and they completely dominated the yachting scene on both sides of the Atlantic before their fantastic cost, and the introduction of income tax and the approach of the Second World War banished them for ever.
Astra, Britannia, Shamrock V, Endeavour, Enterprise, Yankee, Rainbow, Ranger...their very names conjure up an era of wealthy amateur owners, of splendour, beauty and expense which has disappeared for ever. In this wonderful tribute Ian Dear tells the story of an eventful decade, and recaptures with a series of superb pictures the elegance of that bygone yachting scene and the whole flavour of its social background. And in the final chapters of this new edition he recounts in words and photographs the tremendous revival of interest in these great yachts, and the restoration of nearly all those which have survived.

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Editorial Reviews

The Charleston Daily News
Enterprise to Endeavour is an engrossing celebration of the massive and magnificent J-Class yachts. Ian Dear tells how only ten of these formidable yachts were ever built and subsequently raced for the America's Cup as well as for other trophies in American and British waters between 1930 and 1937. Yes, there have been bigger and faster yachts. But none has gripped the public's imaginations as much as the J's did. Alas, their enormous cost and the approach of World War II banished hope of their production. There are 170 b/w photos and illustrations.
Sailing
The America's Cup means different things to different people. There are the personalities, the history, the Cup itself, and of course, the boats: everything from the schooner AMERICA to the most brittle IACC design, struggling to stay in one piece off San Diego or on the Huraki Gulf.

Among the most beautiful competitors for the Hundred Guinea Cup were the storied J-boats, which raced for sailing's ultimate prize in the 1930's and are the subject of Ian Dear's book ENTERPRISE to ENDEAVOUR, which pays tribute to the great, towering behemoths that to many represent a Golden Age of Cup racing.

This past November the book was reissued by the Sheridan House publishing company, in part to mark the latest round of Cup competition now taking place in Auckland, and in part to complement the revival of the J class itself. Although originally published over 20 years ago, the book still captures the spirit of an era that is perhaps the most spectacular in the history of yachting.

Coming out at a time when it seemed the class was on the verge of extinction, Dear's book contains a wealth of photographs and information on the development and what then appeared to be the 'short history' of the J's. It opens with a description of the English 'Big Boats' that preceded the era, cutters for the most part like the royal family's BRITANNIA, and goes on to describe how these boats evolved into the Universal Rule-based J-class with boats over 120 feet long.

In all only 10 J's were ever constructed, but they brought together the cream of yachting including such luminaries as Sir Thomas Lipton, Harold S. Vanderbilt and Starling Burgess, as well as technical breakthroughs like the first aluminum mast and many radical new winch designs.

Although they have been cited many times before, the sheer mass of the Js resulted in some incredible statistics that bear repeating: 170-foot masts, 20-foot overhangs fore and aft, 4-foot-wide Park Avenue booms, 18,000-square-foot spinnakers and 5,000-square-foot mains made of Egyptian cotton that weighed over a ton.

Happily, the Sheridan House reprint features a revised Epilogue in which Dear reports on the current status of the class, which couldn't be more in contrast to the situation in the 1970s.

At that time it seemed as if only one, SHAMROCK, would ever sail again and that none could ever be put back into racing and I said this,' he writes of those dark days. 'How wrong one can be, and how glad I am that I was.'

Today a number of the giants are back in commission including SHAMROCK, VELSHEDA, ASTRA, CANDIDA and the book's namesake, ENDEAVOUR. Not that it wasn't a close call. Many of the Js, including all the American-built boats like WEETAMOE, RAINBOW, YANKEE and RANGER, were scrapped shortly after their racing careers ended. VELSHEDA lay for years with her keel buried in the mud. ENDEAVOUR was a rusty wreck before finally being brought back to pristine condition.

But in the end, there were sailors enough with the drive and financial wherewithal to make sure that more remained of the class than just spectacular photographs. In stark contrast to the time when it first appeared on shelves, Dear's book no longer looks back on a bygone era. Instead, it documents the first chapter in a story that appears ready to endure for years to come.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781574090918
Publisher:
Sheridan House, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/01/1999
Edition description:
4th Edition
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 11.30(h) x 0.80(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

After serving for several years in the Royal Marines Ian Dear worked in the film industry and then book publishing. He has written a number of books on yachting history including The America's Cup: An Informal History, The Royal Yacht Squadron 1815-1985 and The Great Years in Yachting. He is currently working on a history of the Royal Ocean Racing Club to celebrate its 75th anniversary.

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