Enterprise Web 2.0 Fundamentals

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An introduction to next-generation web technologies

This is a comprehensive, candid introduction to Web 2.0 for every executive, strategist, technical professional, and marketer who needs to understand its implications. The authors illuminate the technologies that make Web 2.0 concepts accessible and systematically identify the business and technical best practices needed to make the most of it. You’ll gain a clear understanding of what’s really new about Web 2.0 and what isn’t....

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Overview

An introduction to next-generation web technologies

This is a comprehensive, candid introduction to Web 2.0 for every executive, strategist, technical professional, and marketer who needs to understand its implications. The authors illuminate the technologies that make Web 2.0 concepts accessible and systematically identify the business and technical best practices needed to make the most of it. You’ll gain a clear understanding of what’s really new about Web 2.0 and what isn’t. Most important, you’ll learn how Web 2.0 can help you enhance collaboration, decision-making, productivity, innovation, and your key enterprise initiatives.

The authors cut through the hype that surrounds Web 2.0 and help you identify the specific innovations most likely to deliver value in your organization. Along the way, they help you assess, plan for, and profit from user-generated content, Rich Internet Applications (RIA), social networking, semantic web, content
aggregation, cloud computing, the Mobile Web, and much more.

This is the only book on Web 2.0 that:

  • Covers Web 2.0 from the perspective of every participant and stakeholder, from consumers to product managers to technical professionals
  • Provides a view of both the underlying technologies and the potential applications to bring you up to speed and spark creative ideas about how to apply Web 2.0
  • Introduces Web 2.0 business applications that work, as demonstrated by actual Cisco® case studies
  • Offers detailed, expert insights into the technical infrastructure and development practices raised by Web 2.0
  • Previews tomorrow’s emerging innovations—including “Web 3.0,” the Semantic Web
  • Provides up-to-date references, links, and pointers for exploring Web 2.0 first-hand

Krishna Sankar, Distinguished Engineer in the Software Group at Cisco, currently focuses on highly scalable Web architectures and frameworks, social and knowledge graphs, collaborative social networks, and intelligent inferences.

Susan A. Bouchard is a senior manager with US-Canada Sales Planning and Operations at Cisco. She focuses on Web 2.0 technology as part of the US-Canada collaboration initiative.

  • Understand Web 2.0’s foundational concepts and component technologies
  • Discover today’s best business and technical practices for profiting from Web 2.0 and Rich Internet Applications (RIA)
  • Leverage cloud computing, social networking, and user-generated content
  • Understand the infrastructure scalability and development practices that must be address-ed for Web 2.0 to work
  • Gain insight into how Web 2.0 technologies are deployed
    inside Cisco and their business value to employees, partners, and customers

This book is part of the Cisco Press® Fundamentals Series. Books in this series introduce networking professionals to new networking technologies, covering network topologies, example deployment concepts, protocols, and management techniques.

Category: General Networking

Covers: Web 2.0

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587057632
  • Publisher: Cisco Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/2009
  • Series: Fundamentals
  • Pages: 364
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Krishna Sankar is a Distinguished Engineer with the Software Group at Cisco. He is currently focusing on different forms of the emerging collaborative social networks (as opposed to current functional coordination networks) and other strategic Web 2.0 mechanics inside and outside Cisco. His external work includes the OpenAJAX Alliance, OpenSocial, next generation infrastructure projects such as Ruby on Rails, OAuth, ZooKeeper and Vertebra, as well as the Advisory Board of San Jose Education Foundation. His interests lie in Cloud Computing, highly scalable web architectures, social and knowledge graphs, intelligent inference mechanisms, iPhone programming, and Lego Robotics. Occasionally he writes about them at doubleclix.wordpress.com.

Susan A. Bouchard is a senior manager, Business Development with US-Canada Sales Planning and Operations at Cisco. She focuses on Web 2.0 technology as part of the USCanada Collaboration initiative. Susan’s presentations include

Cisco Systems Case Study: Collaboration, Innovation and Mobility–The Productivity Triple Play on behalf of Dow Jones at the Gartner Customer Relationship Management Summit, September 2008

Cisco Systems Case Study: EA Foundation Delivers Mobile Service Value at Shared Insights’ Enterprise Architectures Conference, March 2007

Cisco Systems Case Study: Architecture Review Process–Improving the IT Portfolio at DCI’s Enterprise Architectures Conference, October 2005

Susan joined Cisco in 2000, and as a Member of Technical Staff helped to establish the Sales IT Partner Architecture Team and led the Cisco Enterprise Architecture Standards & Governance program for five years. Prior to joining Cisco, she was a Computer Scientist with the Department of the Navy, managing the Navy’s e-commerce website for IT products and services. Susan led other software development and support programs for the Navy and Marine Corps in the areas of database administration, artificial intelligence and robotics.

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Read an Excerpt

IntroductionIntroduction

In studying and/or promoting web-technology, the phrase Web 2.0 can refer to a perceived second generation of web-based communities and hosted services—such as social-networking sites, wikis, and folksonomies—which aim to facilitate creativity, collaboration, and sharing between users. The term gained currency following the first O’Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in 2004. Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specifications, but to changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the web.

—Wikipedia

The emergence of Web 2.0 isn’t tied to a specific technology or tool. It’s a collection of advanced capabilities growing out of technologies such as Java, Ajax, and specialized markup languages that simplify sharing and repurposing of web content. These rich and interactive features change the web experience in notable ways:

  • They allow users to participate without regard to geography
  • They democratize information
  • They allow new ideas, products, and features to emerge

The change in the nature of how content is created and these next-generation features are ushering in new opportunities for marketing, customer service, business intelligence, and internal communication. Web 2.0 is perhaps most evident in the consumer marketplace with social networking sites, mash ups, and video sharing services. This is the “play” part of Web 2.0. But this collaborative technology will make huge advances in the business effectiveness with online collaborative tools.

Just as users play a key role in a consumer-based Web 2.0 world of blogs, wikis, communities, and collaboration, they, and the content they create, are critical to the success of Web 2.0 in business as well. Blogs, for example, are changing the marketing landscape and provide an exciting new way to gain valuable customer feedback. Wikis create valuable enterprise knowledge management assets, enabling improved customer service. Bookmarking and folksonomies enable an organization to share information and to define and tag content in ways that facilitate and accelerate search and retrieval. Photos and videos make content more visual, more personal, and more human. They can also become a valuable business asset: a customer video testimonial from a known expert helps sell product.

Web 2.0 technologies enable more effective collaboration and knowledge-sharing, improve decision-making, and accelerate productivity and problem-solving among employees, partners, and customers. Collaborative technologies are key enablers, increasing productivity and reducing travel time and expense. More importantly, collaborative technologies enable business managers to re-engineer and transform their business function, department, or process to reap the business value Web 2.0 and the Mobile Web can enable.

Goals, Objectives, and Approach

A little into the writing of the book, we realized that Web 2.0 is very vast and could fill a thousand-page book! So our challenge was to see what areas we should leave out to cut through the hyperbole, the hype, the billion dollar valuations, and the security threats and still provide the readers with an introduction to the social and business characteristics of Web 2.0 as well as a glimpse of the technologies behind it.

Another challenge we had was to get the right level of detail on the topics we selected. We wanted this book to be not a guided tour but a hitchhiking experience, where sometimes the stops are quick (as in a quick look at UI or wikis), sometimes the detours linger longer (such as in social networking and cloud computing), and sometimes you need to dig deeper via the hundreds of links and references to experience the inner details.

Many of you already have some exposure to various pieces of Web 2.0, but few have a full appreciation for all the vectors of Web 2.0. In this book, we aim to provide a cohesive, coherent view of both the underlying technologies and the potential applications to bring readers up to speed and spark creative ideas about how to apply Web 2.0.

This book does not have ROI calculations or project plans. It also does not rely on extensive code fragments or programming aspects. The major challenge we faced was of omission rather than inclusion. We had to find those key pieces of Web 2.0 that would make an enterprise tick.

An complete understanding of Web 2.0 does not come just from reading a book. One has to also experience the various collaborative formats that make up Web 2.0 by creating an account in facebook.com, developing a wiki, or reading a blog about some topics of interest, or better yet by writing a blog or participating in a collaboration-based wiki.

Who Should Read This Book?

The primary target audience is anyone who has a need to understand Web 2.0 technologies. This includes program managers, marketing managers, business analysts, IT analysts, and so on, who either have to market Web 2.0 or understand enough to engage in Web 2.0 systems development. The audience also includes executives, in any field, who need to understand the Web 2.0 phenomenon.

A secondary audience is the engineers who are working on traditional legacy systems and who want to understand the opportunities Web 2.0 brings. They need an in-depth conceptual view to see how everything fits and also an evaluation of the hottest technologies.

This book does not assume any special knowledge other than general computer literacy and an awareness of the Internet and the web.

Strategies for Experiencing Web 2.0

Using Web 2.0 is like swimming: You cannot really learn it or in this case understand it by standing on the land; you need to immerse yourself in it. We have included many reference URLs to visit that will give you more in-depth information on various aspects of Web 2.0. We urge you to visit these URLs. They are listed in the appendix. You can find an electronic version of the appendix, with all the URLs conveniently hot linked, at the book’s website. Keep in mind that because of the dynamic nature of the web, some links might no longer function depending on when you are reading this book.

Enterprise Web 2.0 Fundamentals Companion Website - You can find the book’s companion website at http://www.ciscopress.com/title/1587057638.

How This Book Is Organized

Although you can read any chapter alone and get a full understanding of that particular aspect of Web 2.0, we recommend you read Chapter 1, “An Introduction to Web 2.0,” which outlines Web 2.0 and gives you an overview of Web 2.0 that should enable you to see how the pieces fit together. After you have a good feel of the various elements that make up the world of Web 2.0, you are free to roam around! But please make sure, at the end, you do visit all the chapters to get an idea of all that Web 2.0 entails. And poke through the URLs listed in the appendix to get a full Web 2.0 experience.

The following is a summary of each chapter:

  • Chapter 1, “An Introduction to Web 2.0,” is the starting point. It details the various aspects—business and technology—of Web 2.0 and sets the stage for the rest of the book.
  • Chapter 2, “User-Generated Content: Wikis, Blogs, Communities, Collaboration, and Collaborative Technologies,” describes the importance of the user and user-generated content in a Web 2.0 world. It identifies how blogs, wikis, communities, collaboration, and collaborative technologies are creating business value.
  • Chapter 3, “Rich Internet Applications: Practices, Technologies, and Frameworks,” describes the essential technologies and business implications behind rich user interfaces and interactions.
  • Chapter 4, “Social Networking,” details the multi-dimensional aspects of social networking—business value, opportunities, and technologies—from Facebook to Twitter and from standards to offerings from the big enterprise players.
  • Chapter 5, “Content Aggregation, Syndication, and Federation via RSS and Atom,” is about the two-way interactions of Web 2.0, including the capability to collect and publish individual contributions via RSS feeds and Atom.
  • Chapter 6, “Web 2.0 Architecture Case Studies,” looks at the most successful web applications like Twitter, eBay, Amazon, and Google and talks about the infrastructure and architecture aspects of Web 2.0 from a development perspective. Web 2.0 definitely has a new feel for application interfaces, protocols, distributability, and scalability.
  • Chapter 7, “Tending to Web 3.0: The Semantic Web,” describes one of the most important next-generation web technologies: the Semantic Web. An introduction to this concept is followed by details of the various aspects of the Semantic Web.
  • Chapter 8, “Cloud Computing,” details a very important development that has lasting impact: cloud computing. This chapter looks into the business practices and the technology stacks that make up the domain of cloud computing.
  • Chapter 9, “Web 2.0 and Mobility,” focuses on the evolution of Mobile Web technology and examines generations of mobile phone services. The chapter touches on a number of mobile devices and key mobility features, such as voice recognition and position location. It provides examples of the types of Mobile Web services available today and identifies Cisco’s efforts to create Mobile Web applications, particularly in sales.

Chapters 10 and 11 provide a set of Cisco case studies of Web 2.0 technology adoption:

  • Chapter 10, “Web 2.0 @ Cisco: The Evolution,” describes the evolution of Web 2.0 technologies at Cisco Systems, Inc. It provides basic steps and best practices for leveraging blogs, discussion forums, and wikis based on Cisco experience.
  • Chapter 11, “Cisco’s Approach to Sales 2.0,” focuses on how Web 2.0 is changing the selling process and how Cisco Sales is leveraging Web 2.0 technology to transform how it does business through more effective communities, collaboration, and collaborative technologies.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xviii

Chapter 1 An Introduction to Web 2.0 3

What Exactly Is This Web 2.0 and Why Should We Care About It? 3

Social Aspects of Web 2.0 5

Business Aspects of Web 2.0 6

Web 2.0 Versions and Generations 11

Web 2.0 CE Versus EE 14

Challenges to Web 2.0 EE Adoption 16

Characteristics and Memes of Web 2.0 16

User-Generated Content 18

Rich Internet Applications (RIA) 18

Social Networks 19

Cloud Computing 19

Web-Centric Development and Architectural Models 19

Data 21

Mashups 22

Scale Free and Long Tail 23

Mobility 24

Web 2.0 at Cisco 24

Web 2.0—Centric Products from Cisco 25

How Cisco Is Leveraging Web 2.0 Internally 27

Chapter 2 User-Generated Content: Wikis, Blogs, Communities, Collaboration, and Collaborative Technologies 33

Evolution of User-Generated Content (UGC) 35

Personal Webpages 35

Blogs 37

Wikis 46

Bookmarking and Folksonomies 54

Photos and Videos 60

Communities 63

Collaboration 65

Collaborative Technologies 65

Cisco TelePresence 65

WebEx 67

Unified Communications 69

Chapter 3 Rich Internet Applications: Practices, Technologies, and Frameworks 77

What Exactly Is an RIA and Why Do We Care About It? 77

A Techno-Business Tour Through the RIA Land 79

Web 2.0 RIA Technologies, Standards, and Frameworks 84

Ajax 85

HTTP Architectural Constraints 87

OpenAjax 88

Ruby on Rails Framework and Infrastructure 89

Chapter 4 Social Networking 91

State of the Union and Business Value of Social Networks 92

Characteristics of a Social App 94

Social Network Ecosystems and Players 96

Facebook: A Complete Ecosystem 96

Facebook Platform 96

Facebook Applications 98

Facebook Platform and Architecture 99

Weaving a Facebook Application 103

LinkedIn: The Corporate Hangout for Jobs and Connections 104

MySpace: The Teen Social Network Site 105

Friendster: Where It All Began 106

Ning: A Generic Social Site Hosting Platform 106

Jive: An Enterprise Platform 107

Socialtext: A Hosted Enterprise Collaboration Tool 107

Awareness: An Enterprise Social Media and Web 2.0 Communities Platform

108

Google: Social Network Interoperability Interfaces 108

Microsoft: Enterprise Content Management with Social Network Features 108

IBM: Making Collaboration a Corporate Priority 109

Twitter: In a New Category by Itself–Microblogging 111

Social Networking Standards and Interfaces 113

OpenSocial 114

OpenID 115

OAuth 117

Other Social Networking Standards 117

Challenges in the Social Networking Industry 118

Relevance and Nature 118

Openness and Data Portability 118

Security and Privacy 119

Data Ownership 120

Worldwide Acceptance and Localization 121

Chapter 5 Content Aggregation, Syndication, and Federation via RSS and Atom 125

Business View of Information Distribution 127

RSS 129

RSS 2.0 Information Architecture 131

RSS 2.0 Modules 133

How RSS Works 134

RSS at CISCO 135

Cisco RSS Publishing 136

Cisco RSS Consumption 137

Enterprise RSS Best Practices 137

Atom 139

Atom Information Architecture 140

Chapter 6 Web 2.0 Architecture Case Studies 143

Web 2.0 Infrastructure Architecture: Scale, Concurrency, and Distributability 144

Web 2.0 Infrastructure Architecture Case Studies 145

eBay 146

YouTube 147

Amazon 148

Google 149

Twitter 151

Flickr 152

Technologies for Scalable Architectures 152

Case for MapReduce and Its Cousin Hadoop 154

Scalable Interfaces 155

Web 2.0 Development and Deployment 156

Chapter 7 Tending to Web 3.0: The Semantic Web 161

A Business Definition of the Semantic Web 161

A Business View of the Semantic Web 163

Semantic Web Origins–From Aristotle to W3C 167

Inner Workings of Semantic Web Technologies 168

Resource Description Framework 169

Web Ontology Language 172

SPARQL 175

Enterprise Applications of the Semantic Web 176

Social Media, Education, and the Semantic Web 176

Semantic Web SaaS Platform 177

Semantic Web Support in Databases 178

Other Enterprise Applications 178

Chapter 8 Cloud Computing 181

Cloud Computing and Its Relevance 181

Cloud Computing Eco System 184

Cloud Computing Business Value 188

Cloud Computing Offerings from Major Vendors 190

Amazon 192

Google 195

Microsoft 195

Live Mesh 195

Azure 195

IBM 197

Sun 197

Other Companies 198

Enterprise Adoption of Cloud Computing 198

Chapter 9 Web 2.0 and Mobility 203

Evolution of Mobile Web Technology 204

Generations of Mobile Phone Technology 204

Mobile Devices 206

Voice Recognition and Position Location Technology 211

Developing Applications for Mobile Devices 211

Mobile Web Applications and Websites 213

Mobile Webapps 213

Web Portals and Wireless Application Service Providers 216

Mobile Social Networking 219

Mobile Web at Cisco 222

Cisco.com Mobile 222

Cisco Text Messaging Services 223

Cisco Mobile Intranet Services 224

Cisco Mobile Sales Information Services 226

Cisco’s Mobile Web Strategy 227

Chapter 10 Web 2.0 @ Cisco: The Evolution 231

Intranet Strategy Group 235

Blogs 236

Discussion Forums 241

Wikis 245

Connecting People, Information, and Communities 250

Video 255

Communications Center of Excellence (CCoE) 256

Communication and Collaboration Board 261

Cisco 3.0 262

Chapter 11 Cisco’s Approach to Sales 2.0 267

Web 2.0 Changes Sales Processes 267

Sales 2.0 268

Cisco Sales Explores Web 2.0 269

Connected Communities 270

Finding Expertise 270

Mobile Sales 2.0 271

Web 2.0 Explorers 272

Mashups 273

Salespedia 274

WebEx Connect Initiative for Sales 275

Sales Innovation via iFeedback 276

U.S.-Canada Sales Theater Initiatives 278

Sales Planning & Operations 279

Scale the Power 281

Administrator Training 282

Collaboration Portal 282

Collaboration Guide 282

Collaboration Hot Topics 286

Collaboration Library 288

Collaboration Cockpit 289

Web 2.0 Committee 290

Worldwide Sales Collaboration Board 290

Advanced Technology 291

Specialist, Optimization, Access, and Results 292

Five to Thrive 295

Worldwide Channels 297

Cisco to Partner 299

Partner to Partner 300

Marketing 303

Collaboration Consortium 303

Appendix References 307

Index 348

TOC, 97815870547632, 3/27/09

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Preface

IntroductionIntroduction

In studying and/or promoting web-technology, the phrase Web 2.0 can refer to a perceived second generation of web-based communities and hosted services—such as social-networking sites, wikis, and folksonomies—which aim to facilitate creativity, collaboration, and sharing between users. The term gained currency following the first O’Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in 2004. Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specifications, but to changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the web.

—Wikipedia

The emergence of Web 2.0 isn’t tied to a specific technology or tool. It’s a collection of advanced capabilities growing out of technologies such as Java, Ajax, and specialized markup languages that simplify sharing and repurposing of web content. These rich and interactive features change the web experience in notable ways:


  • They allow users to participate without regard to geography
  • They democratize information
  • They allow new ideas, products, and features to emerge

The change in the nature of how content is created and these next-generation features are ushering in new opportunities for marketing, customer service, business intelligence, and internal communication. Web 2.0 is perhaps most evident in the consumer marketplace with social networking sites, mash ups, and video sharing services. This is the “play” part of Web 2.0. But this collaborative technology will make huge advances in the business effectiveness with online collaborative tools.

Just as users play a key role in aconsumer-based Web 2.0 world of blogs, wikis, communities, and collaboration, they, and the content they create, are critical to the success of Web 2.0 in business as well. Blogs, for example, are changing the marketing landscape and provide an exciting new way to gain valuable customer feedback. Wikis create valuable enterprise knowledge management assets, enabling improved customer service. Bookmarking and folksonomies enable an organization to share information and to define and tag content in ways that facilitate and accelerate search and retrieval. Photos and videos make content more visual, more personal, and more human. They can also become a valuable business asset: a customer video testimonial from a known expert helps sell product.

Web 2.0 technologies enable more effective collaboration and knowledge-sharing, improve decision-making, and accelerate productivity and problem-solving among employees, partners, and customers. Collaborative technologies are key enablers, increasing productivity and reducing travel time and expense. More importantly, collaborative technologies enable business managers to re-engineer and transform their business function, department, or process to reap the business value Web 2.0 and the Mobile Web can enable.Goals, Objectives, and Approach

A little into the writing of the book, we realized that Web 2.0 is very vast and could fill a thousand-page book! So our challenge was to see what areas we should leave out to cut through the hyperbole, the hype, the billion dollar valuations, and the security threats and still provide the readers with an introduction to the social and business characteristics of Web 2.0 as well as a glimpse of the technologies behind it.

Another challenge we had was to get the right level of detail on the topics we selected. We wanted this book to be not a guided tour but a hitchhiking experience, where sometimes the stops are quick (as in a quick look at UI or wikis), sometimes the detours linger longer (such as in social networking and cloud computing), and sometimes you need to dig deeper via the hundreds of links and references to experience the inner details.

Many of you already have some exposure to various pieces of Web 2.0, but few have a full appreciation for all the vectors of Web 2.0. In this book, we aim to provide a cohesive, coherent view of both the underlying technologies and the potential applications to bring readers up to speed and spark creative ideas about how to apply Web 2.0.

This book does not have ROI calculations or project plans. It also does not rely on extensive code fragments or programming aspects. The major challenge we faced was of omission rather than inclusion. We had to find those key pieces of Web 2.0 that would make an enterprise tick.

An complete understanding of Web 2.0 does not come just from reading a book. One has to also experience the various collaborative formats that make up Web 2.0 by creating an account in facebook.com, developing a wiki, or reading a blog about some topics of interest, or better yet by writing a blog or participating in a collaboration-based wiki.Who Should Read This Book?

The primary target audience is anyone who has a need to understand Web 2.0 technologies. This includes program managers, marketing managers, business analysts, IT analysts, and so on, who either have to market Web 2.0 or understand enough to engage in Web 2.0 systems development. The audience also includes executives, in any field, who need to understand the Web 2.0 phenomenon.

A secondary audience is the engineers who are working on traditional legacy systems and who want to understand the opportunities Web 2.0 brings. They need an in-depth conceptual view to see how everything fits and also an evaluation of the hottest technologies.

This book does not assume any special knowledge other than general computer literacy and an awareness of the Internet and the web.Strategies for Experiencing Web 2.0

Using Web 2.0 is like swimming: You cannot really learn it or in this case understand it by standing on the land; you need to immerse yourself in it. We have included many reference URLs to visit that will give you more in-depth information on various aspects of Web 2.0. We urge you to visit these URLs. They are listed in the appendix. You can find an electronic version of the appendix, with all the URLs conveniently hot linked, at the book’s website. Keep in mind that because of the dynamic nature of the web, some links might no longer function depending on when you are reading this book.

Enterprise Web 2.0 Fundamentals Companion Website - You can find the book’s companion website at http://www.ciscopress.com/title/1587057638.

How This Book Is Organized

Although you can read any chapter alone and get a full understanding of that particular aspect of Web 2.0, we recommend you read Chapter 1, “An Introduction to Web 2.0,” which outlines Web 2.0 and gives you an overview of Web 2.0 that should enable you to see how the pieces fit together. After you have a good feel of the various elements that make up the world of Web 2.0, you are free to roam around! But please make sure, at the end, you do visit all the chapters to get an idea of all that Web 2.0 entails. And poke through the URLs listed in the appendix to get a full Web 2.0 experience.

The following is a summary of each chapter:

  • Chapter 1, “An Introduction to Web 2.0,” is the starting point. It details the various aspects—business and technology—of Web 2.0 and sets the stage for the rest of the book.
  • Chapter 2, “User-Generated Content: Wikis, Blogs, Communities, Collaboration, and Collaborative Technologies,” describes the importance of the user and user-generated content in a Web 2.0 world. It identifies how blogs, wikis, communities, collaboration, and collaborative technologies are creating business value.
  • Chapter 3, “Rich Internet Applications: Practices, Technologies, and Frameworks,” describes the essential technologies and business implications behind rich user interfaces and interactions.
  • Chapter 4, “Social Networking,” details the multi-dimensional aspects of social networking—business value, opportunities, and technologies—from Facebook to Twitter and from standards to offerings from the big enterprise players.
  • Chapter 5, “Content Aggregation, Syndication, and Federation via RSS and Atom,” is about the two-way interactions of Web 2.0, including the capability to collect and publish individual contributions via RSS feeds and Atom.
  • Chapter 6, “Web 2.0 Architecture Case Studies,” looks at the most successful web applications like Twitter, eBay, Amazon, and Google and talks about the infrastructure and architecture aspects of Web 2.0 from a development perspective. Web 2.0 definitely has a new feel for application interfaces, protocols, distributability, and scalability.
  • Chapter 7, “Tending to Web 3.0: The Semantic Web,” describes one of the most important next-generation web technologies: the Semantic Web. An introduction to this concept is followed by details of the various aspects of the Semantic Web.
  • Chapter 8, “Cloud Computing,” details a very important development that has lasting impact: cloud computing. This chapter looks into the business practices and the technology stacks that make up the domain of cloud computing.
  • Chapter 9, “Web 2.0 and Mobility,” focuses on the evolution of Mobile Web technology and examines generations of mobile phone services. The chapter touches on a number of mobile devices and key mobility features, such as voice recognition and position location. It provides examples of the types of Mobile Web services available today and identifies Cisco’s efforts to create Mobile Web applications, particularly in sales.

Chapters 10 and 11 provide a set of Cisco case studies of Web 2.0 technology adoption:

  • Chapter 10, “Web 2.0 @ Cisco: The Evolution,” describes the evolution of Web 2.0 technologies at Cisco Systems, Inc. It provides basic steps and best practices for leveraging blogs, discussion forums, and wikis based on Cisco experience.
  • Chapter 11, “Cisco’s Approach to Sales 2.0,” focuses on how Web 2.0 is changing the selling process and how Cisco Sales is leveraging Web 2.0 technology to transform how it does business through more effective communities, collaboration, and collaborative technologies.

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  • Posted May 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    building mindshare for Cisco ?

    It's perhaps slightly surprising to see this put out by Cisco Press. They usually deal with topics closely if not explicitly tied to Cisco hardware, or to Cisco sponsored credentialling.

    The book has more general scope, for the most part. It talks in broad, largely nontechnical prose, about the Web 2.0. Explaining what this means in terms of blogs, social networking, wikis and other user-generated activities. But it also has meaning in terms of the mobile user, who might access the web from a cellphone, PDA or wireless netbook.

    As to how the Web 2.0 is accomplished in a technical manner, the book describes various programming languages that are popular in building such websites. Think Ajax and Ruby on Rails, for instance.

    The conceptual boundary of the Web is the so-called Semantic Web, a term proposed by Tim Berners-Lee. We get some airing here about the Semantic Web. You get to appreciate that this is still early times for it. The book also brings up cloud computing. Alas, the latter term is so vague, but to the extent that it has useful meaning, the book tries to educate you on this.

    The last 2 chapters are where Cisco is actively promoted. Describing how Cisco uses things like blogs in their sales group. I'm not sure quite what to make of these chapters. Is it mainly to build mindshare about how Cisco uses these ideas? For instance, it mentions how Cisco won several awards for their projects. Good for them.

    The appendices are extensive and quite good, if you want to use the book as a guide to far more detailed resources on the Web. In a way, the appendices somewhat impart the book the flavour of a review article in a scholarly journal, by their copious references to original texts.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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