Entrapment: A High School Comedy in Chat

Entrapment: A High School Comedy in Chat

by Michael Spooner
     
 

Bliss Taylor and Tamra Gray are absolutely convinced that their boyfriends’ hearts lie in the palms of their hands. But when the girls’ two cynical and mischievous friends beg to differ, a wager is born. An online deception ensues where girl must tempt best friend’s boy, resulting in a comedy of love, hate, flirtation, and revelation. Will the

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Overview

Bliss Taylor and Tamra Gray are absolutely convinced that their boyfriends’ hearts lie in the palms of their hands. But when the girls’ two cynical and mischievous friends beg to differ, a wager is born. An online deception ensues where girl must tempt best friend’s boy, resulting in a comedy of love, hate, flirtation, and revelation. Will the boyfriends remain true to their girlfriends’ hearts? Or is the real question vice versa? Told entirely in chat, IM, text, and blog format, this glimpse into games of the heart is as clever as it is surprising.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Structured as a series of blogs, chat-room entries and instant messages, Spooner’s (Last Child) romantic comedy of errors explores the consequences of testing loyalty. Recently dumped high school junior Annie bets her two friends that their boyfriends would cheat on them if given the chance (“let’s just test yr 2 handsome units. see how much u can really trust them”). To prove her wrong, Bliss and Tamra pose as seductive foreign-exchange students in a chat room and try to win the hearts of each other’s beaus. Some amusing online conversations follow as the girls become more and more intense about playing the game, taking on new personas and sometimes showing their truest colors behind the masks of their imagined figures, Tatiana from Albania and Bridget from Great Britain. Despite numerous “lol” moments, the book’s format (which closely resembles Lauren Myracle’s ttyl and its sequels) feels somewhat dated and busy, reading like a screenplay without the benefit of setting descriptions, stage directions and character sketches. While it should appeal to fans of Myracle’s series, it’s unlikely to attract a broader audience. Ages 13–up. (June)
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up–Two high school girls decide to test their boyfriends’ fidelity in this lackluster novel based on Mozart’s Cosi fan tutte. The format–chat-room conversations, instant messages, and blog excerpts–proves more confusing than innovative. At the urging of a cynical friend, Annie, Bliss and Tamra agree to impersonate exchange students (one from England and the other, in a nod to Mozart’s opera, from Albania). They will each spend time in a chat room with the other girl’s boyfriend, attempting to lure him into an online romance. Both girls seem convinced that the boys won’t cheat, but still throw themselves into the dangerous game. Meanwhile, the guys try to resist but soon weaken. A subplot deals with the cynical friend, Annie, and her reasons for proposing the deception in the first place. The author has limited success at developing the characters, though the boys are more vivid than Bliss and Tamra, who come off as weak and easily manipulated. Teens will probably prefer Lauren Myracle’s ttyl (2004) and other books in her “Internet Girls” series (all Abrams).–Miranda Doyle, San Francisco Unified School District
Kirkus Reviews
Mozart in cyberspace. Spooner's adaptation of Cos" fan tutte puts the action online and transposes the genders of the main characters. Bliss and Tamra have loving if not perfect boyfriends; their frenemy Annie contrives to prove to them that all boys are fickle. With the help of fellow misanthrope Johnson, she invents a manipulative plot in which the girls must pretend to be out of town while simultaneously posing as new exchange students online to lead the boys into temptation. The girls acquiesce to Annie's puppet-master antics and are horrified to see how quickly their boyfriends' fidelity erodes. The high drama of the opera translates well to YA fiction, even if the implausibility of the original plot is exaggerated by the modern setting. Sophisticated teens will not relate to the one-dimensional characters and their improbable friendship triads (the brain/Goth/cheerleader and the jock/nerd/dawg). But the format-like Lauren Myracle's Internet Girls trilogy, the story is told entirely via instant messages, chat-room conversations and blog entries-might entice reluctant readers. (Fiction. 12 & up)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416958895
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date:
06/02/2009
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.76(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.15(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Michael Spooner is the author of Daniel’s Walk and Last Child. He lives in Logan, Utah, and you can visit him online at mspooner.net.

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