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Environmental Anthropology: A Historical Reader / Edition 1
     

Environmental Anthropology: A Historical Reader / Edition 1

by Michael R. Dove, Carol Carpenter
 

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ISBN-10: 1405111372

ISBN-13: 9781405111379

Pub. Date: 02/11/2008

Publisher: Wiley

Environmental Anthropology: A Reader is a collection of historically significant readings, dating from early in the twentieth century up to the present, on the cross-cultural study of relations between people and their environment.

  • Provides the historical perspective that is typically missing from recent work in environmental anthropology

Overview

Environmental Anthropology: A Reader is a collection of historically significant readings, dating from early in the twentieth century up to the present, on the cross-cultural study of relations between people and their environment.

  • Provides the historical perspective that is typically missing from recent work in environmental anthropology
  • Includes an extensive intellectual history and commentary by the volume’s editors
  • Offers a unique perspective on current interest in cross-cultural environmental relations
  • Divided into five thematic sections: (1) the nature/culture divide; (2) relationship between environment and social organization; (3) methodological debates and innovations; (4) politics and practice; and (5) epistemological issues of environmental anthropology
  • Organized into a series of paired papers, which ‘speak’ to each other, designed to encourage readers to make connections that they might not customarily make

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405111379
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
02/11/2008
Series:
Wiley Blackwell Anthologies in Social and Cultural Anthropology Series
Pages:
502
Sales rank:
1,176,017
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.95(d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables.

Editors' Biographical Information.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Text Credits.

Introduction: Major Historical Currents in Environmental Anthropology: Michael R. Dove and Carol Carpenter.

Part I: The Nature-Culture Dichotomy:.

Questioning the Nature-Culture Dichotomy: From Posey’s Indigenous Knowledge to Fairhead and Leach’s Politics of Knowledge.

1. Indigenous Management of Tropical Forest Ecosystems: The Case of the Kayapó Indians of the Brazilian Amazon: Darrell Posey.

2. False Forest History, Complicit Social Analysis: Rethinking Some West African Environmental Narratives: James Fairhead and Melissa Leach.

How Cattle Problematize the Nature-Culture Divide: From Evans-Pritchard’s “Cattle Complex” to Harris’ 'Sacred Cows' and Beyond.

3. Interest in Cattle: E. E. Evans-Pritchard.

4. The Cultural Ecology of India’s Sacred Cattle: Marvin Harris.

Part II: Ecology And Social Organization:.

Early Essays on Social Organization and Ecology: Mauss and Steward.

5. Seasonal Variations of the Eskimo: A Study in Social Morphology: Marcel Mauss.

6. The Great Basin Shoshonean Indians: An Example of a Family Level of Sociocultural Integration: Julian H. Steward.

Beyond Steward: 'Ecosystems with Human Beings in Them' in Barth and Geertz.

7. Ecologic Relationships of Ethnic Groups in Swat, North Pakistan: Fredrik Barth.

8. The Wet and the Dry: Traditional Irrigation in Bali and Morocco: Clifford Geertz.

“Natural” Disasters and Social Order: Response and Revelation in Firth and Waddell.

9. Critical Pressures on Food Supply and Their Economic Effects: Raymond Firth.

10. How the Enga Cope with Frost: Responses to Climatic Perturbations in the Central Highlands of New Guinea: Eric Waddell.

Part III: Methodological Challenges And Debates:.

Ethnoecology and the Defense of Swidden Agriculture: Conklin and Carneiro.

11. An Ethnoecological Approach to Shifting Agriculture: Harold Conklin.

12. Slash-and-Burn Agriculture: A Closer Look at Its Implications for Settlement Patterns: Robert L. Carneiro.

Natural Science Models of Resource-Use: From Rappaport’s Cybernetics to the Optimal Foraging of Hawkes, Hill, and O’Connell.

13. Ritual Regulation of Environmental Relations Among a New Guinea People: Roy A. Rappaport.

14. Why Hunters Gather: Optimal Foraging and the Ache of Eastern Paraguay: Kristen Hawkes, Kim Hill and James F. O’Connell.

The Bounded and Balanced Community: Solway and Lee, and Netting.

15. Foragers, Genuine or Spurious?: Situating the Kalahari San in History: Jacqueline S. Solway and Richard B. Lee.

16. Links and Boundaries: Reconsidering the Alpine Village as Ecosystem: Robert McC. Netting.

Part IV: The Politics of Natural Resources and the Environment:.

Indigeneity and Natural Resource Politics: Ellen and Li.

17. Forest Knowledge, Forest Transformation: Political Contingency, Historical Ecology and the Renegotiation of Nature in Central Seram: Roy Ellen.

18. Articulating Indigenous Identity in Indonesia: Resource Politics and the Tribal Slot: Tania M. Li.

Environmental Campaigns and Collaborations: Brosius and Tsing.

19. Green Dots, Pink Hearts: Displacing Politics from the Malaysian Rain Forest: J. Peter Brosius.

20. Becoming a Tribal Elder, and Other Green Development Fantasies: Anna L. Tsing.

Part V: Knowing the Environment:.

Social Identity and Perception of the Landscape: Frake and Bloch.

21. People into Places: Zafimaniry Concepts of Clarity: Maurice Bloch.

22. Pleasant Places, Past Times, and Sheltered Identity in Rural East Anglia: Charles O. Frake.

The Limits of Knowledge and Its Implications for Understanding Environmental Relations: Bateson and Ingold.

23. Effects of Conscious Purpose on Human Adaptation: Gregory Bateson.

24. Globes and Spheres: The Topology of Environmentalism: Tim Ingold.

Index of Subjects.

Index of Names

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