Environmental Costs and Benefits of Transgenic Crops

Overview

Concern about the environmental impacts of transgenic crops is one of the major reasons for the EU’s quasi-moratorium on GMOs. This book shows that the economic implications of these concerns are far-reaching and complex, ranging from the farm to research and technology development to consumer reactions, and that they influence government response, international trade and public and private incentives for R & D.

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Paperback (2005)
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Overview

Concern about the environmental impacts of transgenic crops is one of the major reasons for the EU’s quasi-moratorium on GMOs. This book shows that the economic implications of these concerns are far-reaching and complex, ranging from the farm to research and technology development to consumer reactions, and that they influence government response, international trade and public and private incentives for R & D.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402032486
  • Publisher: Springer Netherlands
  • Publication date: 4/19/2005
  • Series: Wageningen UR Frontis Series , #7
  • Edition description: 2005
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 269
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Table of Contents

Contents Preface 1. Environmental costs and benefits of transgenic crops: Introduction 1 Justus Wesseler (The Netherlands) 2a. Environmental effects of genetically modified crops: differentiated risk assessment and management 7 David Ervin and Rick Welsh (USA) 2b. Comment on Ervin and Welsh: Environmental effects of genetically modified crops: differentiated risk assessment and management 31 Willem Stiekema (The Netherlands) 3a. Assessing the environmental impact of changes in pesticide use on transgenic crops 33 Gijs Kleter and Harry Kuiper (The Netherlands) 3b. Comment on Kleter and Kuiper: Environmental fate and impact considerations related to the use of transgenic crops 45 Terrence Hurley (USA) 4a. Biological limits on agricultural intensification: an example from resistence management 47 Ramanan Laxminarayan and David Simpson (USA) 4b. Comment on Laxminarayan and Simpson: Biological limits on agricultural intensification: an example from resistance management 61 Claudio Soregaroli (Italy) 5a. Stability of pathogen-derived Potato virus Y resistance in potato under field conditions and some aspects of their ecological impact 63 Jörg Schubert (Germany), Jaroslav Matoušek (Czech Republic) and Patrick Supp (Germany) 5b. Comment on Schubert, Matoušek and Supp: Stability of pathogen-derived Potato virus Y resistance in potato under field conditions and some aspects of their ecological impact 79 Ramanan Laxminarayan (USA) 6a. Bacillus thuringiensis resistance management: experiences from the USA 81 Terrence Hurley (USA) 6b. Comment on Hurley: Bacillus thuringiensis resistance management: experiences from theUSA 95 Rick Welsh (USA) 7a. Gene flow from crops to wild plants and its population-ecological consequences in the context of GM-crop biosafety, including some recent experiences with lettuce 97 Clements van de Wiel, Mirella Groot and Hans den Nijs (The Netherlands) 7b. Comment on Van de Wiel, Groot and Den Nijs: Gene flow from crop to wild plants and its population-ecological consequences in the context of GM-crop biosafety, including some recent experiences from lettuce 111 Sara Scatasta (The Netherlands) 8a. Irreversible costs and benefits of transgenic crops: what are they? 113 Matty Demont (Belgium), Justus Wesseler (The Netherlands) and Eric Tollens (Belgium) 8b. Comment on Demont, Wesseler and Tollens: Irreversible costs and benefits of transgenic crops: what are they? 123 Meira Hanson (Israel) 9a. Ex post evidence on adoption of transgenic crops: US soybeans 125 Robert Weaver (USA) 9b. Comment on Weaver: Ex post evidence on adoption of transgenic crops: US soybeans 141 Wim Heijman (The Netherlands) 10a. Spatial and temporal dynamics of gene movements arising from deployment of transgenic crops 143 Chris Gilligan (UK), David Claessen (The Netherlands) and Frank van den Bosch (Switzerland) 10b. Comment on Gilligan, Claessen and Van den Bosch: Spatial and temporal dynamics of gene movements arising from deployment of transgenic crops 163 Ekko van Ierland (The Netherlands) 11a. Minimum distance requirements and liability: implications for co-existence165 Claudio Soregaroli (Italy) and Justus Wesseler (The Netherlands) 11b. Comment on Soregaroli and Wesseler: Minimum distance requirements and liability: implications for co-existence 183 Volker Beckmann (Germany) 12

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