Eothen

Eothen

4.3 3
by Alexander William Kinglake
     
 

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This is an extraordinary work of travel writing that is more about the author's personal exploration than it is about monuments and museums. Inspired by a journey with an Eton colleague ten years prior, this memoir exemplifies how travel can become a personal experience and change who we are. Though over a century and half old, Eothen, Traces of Travel Brought Home… See more details below

Overview

This is an extraordinary work of travel writing that is more about the author's personal exploration than it is about monuments and museums. Inspired by a journey with an Eton colleague ten years prior, this memoir exemplifies how travel can become a personal experience and change who we are. Though over a century and half old, Eothen, Traces of Travel Brought Home from the East feels as strikingly modern as any contemporary literary memoir.

Kinglake's intimate, conversational style and his sense of humor and irony made Eothen-meaning "from the early dawn" or "from the East"-an instant success when it was first published in 1844. Even today, in the 21st century, it maintains its fresh and original feel. For lovers of travel, the Middle East, or self discovery this book will become an instant favorite.

British writer and historian ALEXANDER WILLIAM KINGLAKE (1809-1891) was educated at Eton College and Trinity College, Cambridge. Before devoting himself to literature and writing, he built up a prestigious law practice, which he later abandoned. In addition to writing Eothen, or Traces of Travel Brought Home from the East, he also wrote the eight-volume Invasion of the Crimea (1863-1887).

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Editorial Reviews

The Washington Post
Obviously, this minor Victorian classic is a principal template for scores of later books by sandy-haired Brits going off to seek adventure in far-flung, exotic places. Think of Robert Byron on the road to Oxiana, Eric Newby taking a short walk in the Hindu Kush, Bruce Chatwin trekking through Patagonia. For all its charm, though, a 21st-century American will grow quickly aware that Eothen is suffused with many of the classic prejudices of the Westerner toward "Oriental" cultures and civilizations. Kinglake sometimes admires the people he encounters, but whether he does or not, he makes clear, if only implicitly, that the "soft Asiatic" belongs to an inferior race and his customs are barbarous, or laughable, or just too damn mysterious to be understood. — Michael Dirda

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940019998579
Publisher:
London, J.M. Dent and co.
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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