Epidemiology of Sleep Age, Gender, and Ethnicity

Epidemiology of Sleep Age, Gender, and Ethnicity

by Kenneth L. Lichstein, Daniel J. Taylor, Andrew J. Bush, Brant W. Riedel
     
 

What is the prevalence of insomnia in a particular age group, in men and women, or in Caucasians and African Americans? What is the average total sleep time among normal sleepers among these groups? How does the sleep of Caucasians and African Americans differ? These are just some of the questions addressed in The Epidemiology of Sleep.

This new book

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Overview

What is the prevalence of insomnia in a particular age group, in men and women, or in Caucasians and African Americans? What is the average total sleep time among normal sleepers among these groups? How does the sleep of Caucasians and African Americans differ? These are just some of the questions addressed in The Epidemiology of Sleep.

This new book presents the most detailed and comprehensive archive of normal and abnormal sleep patterns. Based on a landmark study supported by the National Institute on Aging, 772 subjects from a host of populations including men, women, and various age and ethnic groups, prepared detailed sleep diaries for a two-week period. The use of these sleep diaries yielded a plethora of data on such characteristics as normal sleep patterns, various forms of insomnia, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and daytime sleepiness differentiated by age, sex, and ethnicity. The results generated by these data, charted in the book's numerous tables and graphs, provide a critical methodological advance in the sleep literature.

The Epidemiology of Sleep opens with an overview of the rationale and unique characteristics of the study. This is followed by a comprehensive review of the existing epidemiological literature on sleep. Chapter three presents a detailed description of the methods used in the survey followed by meticulous information on the epidemiology of normal and insomnia sleep, that is unparalleled in the literature. Chapter six provides an archive of sleep patterns among African Americans. The book concludes with a discussion and interpretation of the most interesting findings.

This insightful study, coupled with the comprehensive review of the existing literature on the epidemiology of sleep, make this volume an invaluable resource for sleep researchers, clinicians, health and clinical psychologists, gerontologists, epidemiologists, and advanced students.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Howard M. Kravitz, DO, MPH (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This book is, according to its authors, a description of yet another, but unique, epidemiological study of sleep and the first book devoted to this topic.
Purpose: The purpose of this book is to present, "(F)or the first time, in depth information on the epidemiology of normal and insomnia sleep" (p. x), "to gain knowledge about sleep that did not previously exist" (p. 3), in a sample that features "ethnic diversity." The book is based on research by Dr. Lichstein and associates, which was funded by the National Institute on Aging and Tennessee state agencies, and involved two main racial/ethnic groups, Caucasians and African-Americans (69.8% Caucasian, 28.9% African-American, 0.9% Asian, 0.1 % Hispanic, 0.3% missing ethnicity; p. 68). Dr. Lichstein is an experienced sleep researcher and professor of psychology.
Audience: The targeted audience is sleep researchers, clinicians, health and clinical psychologists, gerontologists, epidemiologists, and advanced students — a truly broad-based and eclectic audience. As a psychiatrist and psychiatric epidemiologist, I would add these two groups.
Features: In seven chapters, the authors present the rationale for the study and describe its distinctive characteristics (chapter 1); comprehensively review the epidemiological literature on self reported "insomnia" through 2002 (chapter 2); describe their survey methods (chapter 3); present detailed data with lots of tables and figures on normal sleep (chapter 4) and insomnia (chapter 5) in their whole sample and separately for the African-American subsample (chapter 6); and summarize their main findings (chapter 7). Black-and-white line figures are clear and easy to read, with informative captions. A 38-page appendix following chapter 4 includes 67 tables of descriptive data on and analysis of the full and normal samples. The book ends with an appendix of abbreviations and acronyms, the references (which include a few from 2003), and separate author and subject indexes.
Assessment: This is an interesting compilation of the authors' research data together with a literature review on self-reported insomnia through 2002. It is a prevalence study of insomnia in a community sample, a laudable attempt to define normal/normative sleep and insomnia based purely on self-report. As such it fills an important niche in the epidemiological study of sleep — these rich survey questionnaire data should satisfy the appetite of clinicians and researchers alike, and point the way toward further work in understanding sleep and refining methods for studying it. But the reader should not overinterpret these data — self-perceptions require objective validation. As the authors note, this book is not the final word on the epidemiology of sleep — however, it's a good place to start, "another peek into the mystery of sleep" (p. 216).

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805840803
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
06/10/2004
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

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