Erased Faces

Erased Faces

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by Graciela Limon
     
 

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Fiction. Latino/a Studies. Weaving the threads of Lacandon myth and history with the events culminating in the guerilla uprising, Graciela Limon in ERASED FACES creates a rich fabric that restores an identity to those rendered invisible, or whose faces were erased by years of oppression. ERASED FACES is a story about forbidden love set against the backdrop of a

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Overview

Fiction. Latino/a Studies. Weaving the threads of Lacandon myth and history with the events culminating in the guerilla uprising, Graciela Limon in ERASED FACES creates a rich fabric that restores an identity to those rendered invisible, or whose faces were erased by years of oppression. ERASED FACES is a story about forbidden love set against the backdrop of a complicated war. "What courage to take on the Chiapas rebellion, to tell that story from the point of view of women and their own double and triple struggles for liberation from not only a racial and economic war, but a sexual one..."-Alicia Gaspar de Alba, author of Sor Juana's Second Dream.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Limon's previous works, including The Day of the Moon and Song of the Hummingbird, have been called both "artful" and "soapy." Her latest work is characterized by some of the same strengths and shortcomings, but its engrossing plot slowly wins the reader's sympathy and any overwrought passages are forgotten. Set in the dense Mexican jungle and the barrios of Los Angeles, the novel tells of the obstacles people must face to overcome their history and heritage. Though it revolves around classic themes of forbidden love, loss, isolation and the search for the self, the setting imbues freshness. Limon uses the Mayan myth of reincarnation to lay the groundwork for her ultimate point that we are given opportunities to reclaim our lives. If anyone needs to recoup a life, it is Adriana Mora. A Mexican-American photojournalist plagued by memories of her tragic childhood and by frightening dreams of loss, Adriana is drawn to Chiapas, Mexico, by an interest in Mayan civilization. From the pain of her past to her eventual involvement with a group of Zapatistas and her intimate relationship with one of its leaders, Adriana's bittersweet tale is told in passionate testimonial style. Despite its intensity, however, her sentiments seem calculated, and it is the personal histories of two other characters, Juana Galv n and Orlando Flores, that redeem the tale. As heroes of the Chiapas insurgency, they embody the suffering of centuries of indigenous peoples, but they invite sympathy on a personal level, too. In her absorbing, politically engaged work, Limon restores dignity and identity to the inhabitants of a violent land, sketching tangled landscapes where faces are constantly erased and swept intoanonymity. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558853423
Publisher:
Arte Publico Press
Publication date:
12/28/2001
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.80(d)

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Erased Faces 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book because it was one of the very few books that kept me interested in it and wanting to go back and read some more of it. The book can make you go into different moods when you are reading it. Theres some sad parts to it like the begining when she lost her parents. There are also some exiting parts of the book that you just cant stop reading only half ways. I like how the main character is really strong going through all these tough times in her life and yet managed to get throught them. Its also hard to think how all of these things are going on in the area of Chiapas. I think that is what helped the main character with her life problems when she had seen how other parts of the world were worst than what she had been through. I would really recommend this book.