Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium

Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium

by Gary Alan Scott, William A. Welton
     
 

Erotic Wisdom provides a careful reading of one of Plato’s most beloved dialogues, the Symposium, which explores the nature and scope of human desire (erôs). Gary Alan Scott and William A. Welton engage all of the dialogue’s major themes, devoting special attention to illuminating Plato’s conception of philosophy. In the Symposium, Plato… See more details below

Overview

Erotic Wisdom provides a careful reading of one of Plato’s most beloved dialogues, the Symposium, which explores the nature and scope of human desire (erôs). Gary Alan Scott and William A. Welton engage all of the dialogue’s major themes, devoting special attention to illuminating Plato’s conception of philosophy. In the Symposium, Plato situates philosophy in an intermediate (metaxu) position—between need and resource, ignorance and knowledge—showing how the very lack of what one desires can become a guiding form of contact with the objects of human desire. The authors examine the concept of intermediacy in relation both to Platonic metaphysics and to Plato’s moral psychology, arguing that philosophy, for Plato, is properly understood as a kind of “being in-between,” as the love of wisdom (philosophia) rather than the possession of it.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791475836
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publication date:
11/13/2008
Series:
SUNY series in Ancient Greek Philosophy
Pages:
297
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Chapter 1. Introductory Dialogue (172a–178a)

Chapter 2. Six Speeches on Love (Erôs)

The Speech of Phaedrus (178a–180c)

The Speech of Pausanias (180c–185e)

The Speech Eryximachus (185c–185e)

The Speech of Aristophanes (189a–193e)

The Speech of Agathon (194e–198a)

Interlude (198a–199c)

Socrates Questions Agathon (199c–201c)

Diotima Questions Socrates (201d–203b)

The Speech of Socrates (202b–212b)

Chapter 3. The Entrance and Speech of Alcibiades (212c–222c)

Chapter 4. Conclusion

Appendix: Intermediacy, Philosophy, and Recollection

Notes
Works Cited
Index

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >