Erroll

Erroll

by Hannah Shaw
     
 

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When something supremely silly is needed for storytime: choose Erroll. Or as Erroll himself might say: “Pick me! Pick me! Pick me!” And then he’d turn a somersault, swing from the drapes, and get peanut butter all over everything.

For kids who like high-energy shenanigans, and for grown-ups who’d like to almost prove the point that a

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Overview

When something supremely silly is needed for storytime: choose Erroll. Or as Erroll himself might say: “Pick me! Pick me! Pick me!” And then he’d turn a somersault, swing from the drapes, and get peanut butter all over everything.

For kids who like high-energy shenanigans, and for grown-ups who’d like to almost prove the point that a neat-and-tidy suburban home may not be the best place for a very wild critter, this fun and funny story of a boy who finds a talking squirrel in his snack package will be just the ticket.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
04/27/2015
Loopy illustrations and emphatic typography amplify the nuttiness of Shaw's (Sneaky Weasel) scattered story of a boy and a talking squirrel he finds in a snack pack of Nutti Nutts. Wide-eyed Bob "could only imagine how Errol had gotten inside the package of nuts in the first place." And he does just that in a Rube Goldsbergesque visual sequence that transports the squirrel from forest to grocery store (with plenty of tubes, gears, and conveyer belts in between). The frisky, peanut butter sandwich–loving critter creates mayhem in Bob's house—swinging from an overhead light, chomping on a table, and decorating a wall with footprints—as the boy's oblivious mother works in the garden. When she finally spies Erroll's handiwork, she announces that he must go back home, and mother and son return Erroll to the woods. Kids will enjoy the pandemonium, which Shaw's cartoons play up at every opportunity. But similarly to how squirrels leap from branch to branch and race around tree trunks for reasons opaque to human observers, the story jumps from scene to scene with little holding it all together. Ages 5-8. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Erika Clark
One day, a young boy named Bob opened a bag of Nutti Nutts peanuts when out jumped a small squirrel. To Bob's surprise, not only did this squirrel love peanut butter, just like him, but the squirrel could talk as well. After Bob learned how messy a pet squirrel can be in the house, he understood some of the helpful skills learned from Erroll. The cartoon-style illustrations lighten the story line and the role of the characters. The author includes onomatopoeias and plenty of punctuation marks that convey emotion, sensory imagery, and creativity. The story, however, did not provide interesting details about Erroll and Bob. From the beginning, the reader is left wondering why the squirrel was trapped in the bag of peanuts. The illustrations help young readers visualize the experience, but the text is not successful in answering this question. Shaw could have included more information about how humans change the natural environments of insects, animals, and plants to support her story. Furthermore, the author could have challenged students to think about scientific ways of solving these issues, which would make the book a choice for use in an integrated curriculum at the elementary level. Reviewer: Erika Clark
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1—In this fanciful saga, young Bob finds a mischievous squirrel packed inside his bag of NuttiNutts snacks. Pandemonium ensues when he lets the hyperactive critter roam inside the house. The boy's mother is not amused by Erroll's antics (jumping on the couch, tipping over the potted plant) and insists that they drive him back to the forest to live with his squirrel pals. Children will enjoy poring over the brightly colored, busy cartoon illustrations, which feature everything nut-related. On one page readers can study a convoluted factory set-up that shows how Bob imagines Erroll got into the snack pack. Unfortunately, the lighthearted conclusion showing the boy with a box of Chewy Crunchy Monkey Munchy cereal implies a final joke that may only be considered clever and funny during the initial reading. Additional—Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375861055
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
02/09/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Erroll is the second picture book by Hannah Shaw, who received a Publishers Weekly starred review for her debut, Sneaky Weasel. She lives in Cherington, England. Visit her online at www.hannahshawillustrator.co.uk.

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