Escape from the Order! [NOOK Book]

Overview

Escape from the Order! © 2010 by Steve Nelson
Is a fictional look into a very real possible future. The characters are fictional but the Facts are Real!
Two friends are born in a Government training facility & learn all that the New Order wants them to learn.
Experience the future of the human in the New Order through the eyes of ...

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Escape from the Order!

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Overview

Escape from the Order! © 2010 by Steve Nelson
Is a fictional look into a very real possible future. The characters are fictional but the Facts are Real!
Two friends are born in a Government training facility & learn all that the New Order wants them to learn.
Experience the future of the human in the New Order through the eyes of Male2014, his assigned female breeding partners & his friend Male2012.
Imagine an Already Planned future where the human herd is limited in numbers & highly controlled.
It is suitable for young adults & up.
‘Escape from the Order!’ Is a really wonderful story. Every Amer-I-Can should get a copy, read it & share it with friends!” Steve Nelson
If you ever enjoyed ‘Soylent Green’ or ‘THX1138’ you’ll love,
‘Escape from the Order!’
Over 46,000 Action Packed words and pics too!

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940033043590
  • Publisher: Steve Nelson
  • Publication date: 2/8/2012
  • Sold by: Smashwords
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Hey, when I write a story, I write it so its a smooth read. You don't have to carry a dictionary to read one of my stories. Easy on the eyes and smooth read'in + a swell story, that's what I like!
Steve Nelson is a resident of N. Ogden, Utah.
He has worked for over 30 years at Business Ownership and in the Handyman/Maintenance field. He is a H.S. Graduate.
Steve has written 10 books;
Tomorrow’s World #1 (Currently Published in Hardback form by PublishAmerica.com)
TW2 DESERT TREK- Now on SMASHWORDS & spiral bound and self published.
The Maintenance Engineer- Now on SMASHWORDS & spiral bound and self published.
Escape from the ORDER!- Now on SMASHWORDS & spiral bound and self published.
The Problem Eliminators!- Now Published with Smashwords!
Steve is easy to find on Facebook, just lookup Steve Nelson of Ogden, Utah and find the guy in the Australian bush hat!
G’Day

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2013

    So, once again, I only read the first 20% of this book, which is

    So, once again, I only read the first 20% of this book, which is offered on Smashwords for free. According to the author, "This story is Better, more accurate and a lot cheaper than Hollyweird’s new movie called, ‘The Hunger Games!’" I beg to differ.
    The Hunger Games was done exceptionally well, and is one of the few movies I’ve seen that managed to stay true to the book. Really, this statement causes me to think that the author either hasn't read/seen The Hunger Games, or is simply a narcissist. 
    But I digress; as I read the opening paragraph, it really didn't leave a bad impression. While it's true that the writing style needed far more work, the overall effect did leave me wondering what was next. Unfortunately, what we see next is characteristic of this author’s work --- infodump. Yes, the protagonist then goes on to tell his entire life story, beginning from the day he was born.
    I don’t know if Nelson has ever read any sci-fi before (or any other books, for that matter) but he seems to think the purpose of sci-fi is to add bits of relatively uncommon modern-day technology and unnecessary “futuristic” details to an otherwise ordinary tale. For example; while telling his exhaustively dull autobiography, the protagonist tells us about how all humans are implanted with microchips, have their heads shaved, and are given incredibly long tattoos. None of this is really explained, and when it is it is very poorly done. The microchips are, of course, tracking devices; a common element in many modern sci-fi and dystopian novels. The shaved heads are never explained. The tattoo explanation I find uproariously unrealistic.
    For example; the protagonist’s tattoo (name) is “Male20140414pHBSC”. This is “New Order” code for his gender, date of birth, and possible future career (breeding stock). In his facility, he is called “Male2014”. Does anyone but me see a problem with this classification system? First of all, referring to the protagonist as “Male2014” wouldn’t work unless he was the only male born in 2014 living in his barracks. This is, of course, highly improbable. This entire thing simply wouldn’t work --- if this is a world government, what about any other potential male breeders born on his birthday? Immediately we have a flaw in the system.
    So, Male2014 lives in his barracks with his friend, Male2012, a potential soldier. Together, the pair engages in “wild activities” such as “Turning all their {girl’s} coveralls inside out and tying the legs together at the laundry…” Wow, such rebels… not. Except they are! That’s right, they get sent to the office for this and the “thumb tack incident” (never gone into, but surely more interesting than laundry pranks) and are threatened with being assigned to bad careers.
    Because bad careers are viewed as a sort of prison, Male2014 and 2012 cease their rebellious laundry sabotage and take solace in their “Mother Earth devotionals” (yes, the capitalization error is in the book), where they are told they are a blight upon the earth.
    Alas, Male2012 gets sent to his training facility and everyone is sad. A love interest is hinted at for Male2014, and we learn that the human digestive system is now so efficient that people can live off protein shakes without suffering horrible constipation.
    This was only the first chapter, and already we can see the story isn’t going anywhere interesting. Nelson has obviously never heard of worldbuilding, and with the exception of names, there are no defining characteristics among characters. Formatting errors run rampant along with logical inconsistencies, making me question whether or not Nelson has done any research or planning before writing. Really, the book is so bad it’s funny.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 15, 2012

    So, once again, I only read the first 20% of this book, which is

    So, once again, I only read the first 20% of this book, which is offered on Smashwords for free. According to the author, "This story is Better, more accurate and a lot cheaper than Hollyweird’s new movie called, ‘The Hunger Games!’" I beg to differ.
    "The Hunger Games" was done exceptionally well, and is one of the few movies I’ve seen that managed to stay true to the book. Really, this statement causes me to think that the author either hasn't read/seen "The Hunger Games", or is simply a narcissist.
    But I digress; as I read the opening paragraph, it really didn't leave a bad impression. While it's true that the writing style needed far more work, the overall effect did leave me wondering what was next. Unfortunately, what we see next is characteristic of this author’s work --- infodump. Yes, the protagonist then goes on to tell his entire life story, beginning from the day he was born.
    I don’t know if Nelson has ever read any sci-fi before (or any other books, for that matter) but he seems to think the purpose of sci-fi is to add bits of relatively uncommon modern-day technology and unnecessary “futuristic” details to an otherwise ordinary tale. For example; while telling his exhaustively dull autobiography, the protagonist tells us about how all humans are implanted with microchips, have their heads shaved, and are given incredibly long tattoos. None of this is really explained, and when it is it is very poorly done. The microchips are, of course, tracking devices; a common element in many modern sci-fi and dystopian novels. The shaved heads are never explained. The tattoo explanation I find uproariously unrealistic.
    For example; the protagonist’s tattoo (name) is “Male20140414pHBSC”. This is “New Order” code for his gender, date of birth, and possible future career (breeding stock). In his facility, he is called “Male2014”. Does anyone but me see a problem with this classification system? First of all, referring to the protagonist as “Male2014” wouldn’t work unless he was the only male born in 2014 living in his barracks. This is, of course, highly improbable. This entire thing simply wouldn’t work --- if this is a world government, what about any other potential male breeders born on his birthday? Immediately we have a flaw in the system.
    So, Male2014 lives in his barracks with his friend, Male2012, a potential soldier. Together, the pair engages in “wild activities” such as “Turning all their {girl’s} coveralls inside out and tying the legs together at the laundry…” Wow, such rebels… not. Except they are! That’s right, they get sent to the office for this and the “thumb tack incident” (never gone into, but surely more interesting than laundry pranks) and are threatened with being assigned to bad careers.
    Because bad careers are viewed as a sort of prison, Male2014 and 2012 cease their rebellious laundry sabotage and take solace in their “Mother Earth devotionals” (yes, the capitalization error is in the book), where they are told they are a blight upon the earth.
    Alas, Male2012 gets sent to his training facility and everyone is sad. A love interest is hinted at for Male2014, and we learn that the human digestive system is now so efficient that people can live off protein shakes without suffering horrible constipation.
    This was only the first chapter, and already we can see the story isn’t going anywhere interesting. Nelson has obviously never heard of worldbuilding, and with the exception of names, there are no defining characteristics among characters. Formatting errors run rampant along with logical inconsistencies, making me question whether or not Nelson has done any research or planning before writing. Really, the book is so bad it’s funny.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

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